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Lowell Barron Responds to Official Dismissal of Charges

Lee Hedgepeth

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By Lee Hedgepeth
Alabama Political Reporter

This week, after unanimously losing an appeal to the Alabama Supreme Court over evidentiary matters in the case, Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange formally moved to drop all charges against former State Senate Pro Tem Lowell Barron, D-Fyffe, and a judge has now certified that decision.

Barron had originally been indicted with several charges stemming from alleged campaign violations perpetuated by himself and his former campaign aide Jill Johnson.

AG Strange had contended in earlier court documentation that advancing the theory of a romantic relationship between Barron and his former aide was “fatal” to his case. And after the Alabama Supreme Court has now ruled against the Attorney General, that truly turned out to “fatal” to the case – ending it altogether.

Former Senator Barron released the following statement on the decision certify the dropping of the charges against him:

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“Thank you for every prayer, call, and visit I have received from so many. I’m grateful to the court system of Alabama and for the judicial process, which has restored my good name and put an end to this case,” he said.

“Now I’m going to get back to doing what I do best these days – spending time with my grandchildren.”

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Opinion | Looking for a day or a person?

John W. Giles

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Are you looking for a particular day or are you looking for a person? Yes, Dec. 25 is Christmas; so after all of the gifts are opened and the living room is cleaned up, it is like; so what do we do now? Many do suffer a little from post-Christmas downheartedness and become a little visionless. Days come and go, but people are with us for a lifetime.

Christmas should be an exciting time of year and like the song says; “It’s The Most Wonderful Time of the Year.” People seem to be kinder, a bit more charitable to the downtrodden and those in need; even Ole Ebenezer Scrooge has a changed heart and a sense of charity. Is it giving or receiving gifts, Christmas decorations, Christmas carols, Christmas bonuses from our job or a sense of expectation? I would suggest that it goes much deeper than the expectation of a day or material benefits, this unexplained expectation can be found buried deep in the treasures of the Season of Advent.

What is Advent? How does it relate to Christmas? Many expressions of Christianity throughout the world still use the ancient Liturgical calendar, which is a series of religious feasts and seasons celebrated year round. The early New Testament Church inherited many of these feasts and celebrations from ancient Jewish customs, traditions, ancestry, feasts and celebrated events between mankind and the God of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and the Promise Land of Israel. The Christian Liturgical calendar begins each year with Advent, then Christmas, Ordinary Time, Lent, Easter, then Ordinary Time again and then it starts all over again.

The Latin word for Advent is adventus, which means arrival or appearance. Advent is the arrival of a notable person. It is also a season observed by many expressions of Christianity worldwide, which is a time of expectancy, anticipation, preparation for the Nativity of Jesus and also the return of Jesus known as the second coming. This Season begins four Sundays before Christmas. The Season of Christmas according to the Liturgical calendar begins on Christmas Eve and this year goes through January 13th which is the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord. In reality, Christmas should not be just confined to one day. We will take a look at the Season of Christmas later on.

When we use computers, deeply embedded below the surface of our work on the screen is all of this code language written by computer experts that makes our software run. Deeply embedded into God’s plan and the core of our foundation during this time of year is an unwritten code for a time of expectancy, looking to the future with an excitement and the hope of better days ahead. The promise to the Old Testament prophets was a new King; redeemer of man’s sin was going to come, a Messiah, which means Christ in Greek.

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The New Testament story began when an engaged virgin named Mary was visited by an angel of the Lord named Gabriel. He startled her with a life changing message; she was chosen as the only woman on earth to conceive a child by the Holy Spirit and would bear a son and his name would be Emmanuel, which means, “God With US.” God later appeared to Joseph her husband in a dream and calmed his anxiety about her expecting a child outside of wedlock and told Joseph he would have a son and he shall be named Jesus and he would save his people from their sins. Talk about expectancy; Jesus, Emanuel, God with us was to be borne by a virgin and would be the redeemer or savior of the world. If we ever needed redemption in our life, here it is, as we wait with great expectation of the coming of the savior of the world.

Advent is also symbolized by the Advent wreath, which is a long standing Christian tradition that symbolizes the four weeks leading up to the coming of our savior. It started in Germany among German Lutherans in the 16th century. It is a horizontal wreath made from greenery with four candles which are lit one at the time each Sunday. The circular wreath symbolizes God’s infinite love for us and the greenery symbolizes the evergreen hope of eternal life. The candles lit each week are symbolic of the light of Christ: Week One – Hope, Week Two – Peace, Week Three – Joy and Week Four – Love. Generally all of the candles are the same color except on Week – Three, which is pink symbolizing Gaudete Sunday, which means in Latin to “rejoice” for he is almost here.

Advent is also a celebration of the expectancy of his second coming. For the redeemed, Advent is a time of prayer and fasting serving as a reminder of his nativity birth, but looking with great anticipation of his promised return.  While there are many biblical accounts citing this second coming, Jesus told the parable about the Ten Virgins who took their lamps and went out to meet the bridegroom. The bible refers to the redeemed (saved) as the bride of Christ; so these Ten Virgins are symbolic of you and I and meeting the bridegroom in his second coming. Five were prudent and took additional oil with them and the other five were not prudent and did not have staying power, waiting for the arrival of the bridegroom. When the announcement came that the bridegroom had arrived, five made it and five did not.

During this Season of Advent, let’s go deeper than the surface of a particular day, Christmas decorations, parades and gifts. Let’s be aware of those around us who need a touch, smile, encouragement, hand up or a note. Let’s also be givers and not takers. Traditionally over time, we have been encouraged to pray and fast, with the expectation of his arrival. Truefully speaking; the oil in the parable of the Ten Virgins is the Holy Spirit; so when we pray for others and fast our opportunities to help others will soar and our lamps will be filled to over flowing. The Holy Spirit is this deeply embedded code that urges us to be charitable, kind and sympathetic to others.

So this Season of Advent leading up to Christmas, try and recalibrate our thinking from a particular day to a particular person.

May God richly bless you and your family during this special Season of Advent.

 

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Opinion | Jo Bonner comes to Montgomery

Larry Lee

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Gov. Kay Ivey has just announced that former U.S. Rep. Jo Bonner is joining her staff as “senior advisor.” In my opinion, this is great news for the people of Alabama.

I have known Jo since 1982. And if I could sum him up in just one word, it would be GENUINE. What you see is what you get.

As far as I know, he is the same person he was when I met him 36 years ago. He has a moral compass that is steadfast and has always seen the light side of life–even when the joke is on him. Trust me, there are not many in the political world I would say this about.

He was just out of school at the University of Alabama and working on the campaign of my college classmate, Lt. Governor George McMillan, who was running for governor, in 1982. (And lost in a runoff to George Wallace.) Jo was working throughout the Wiregrass and was stationed in Dothan.

McMillan was having a rally in Dothan and that’s where Jo and I met. At some point that evening Jo asked where I was spending the night since I lived in Montgomery. I told him I had no plans and he graciously suggested that I spend the night with him since he had an available bed. I did.

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Years later when he was elected to Congress from Alabama’s First District, he sent me a note on his stationary and said something to the effect, “I will not forget the night we spent together in Dothan.”

He told me later with a hardy laugh that his secretary questioned what he said in the note and asked him if he was really going to send it.  He told her he was because it was true. How do you not appreciate that quality in a person?

When we studied 10 rural elementary schools in 2008, I was dumbfounded by the physical condition of Calcedever elementary in the north end of Mobile County. To call it deplorable was being too kind.

I got Jo to come visit the school and see firsthand. He did. And in each room he quickly told the students that he worked in Washington and if they were ever going to be there, he would help arrange a tour for them. A little blond guy in the first grade paid rapt attention and as soon as Jo said this, he quickly pulled out his pencil and asked, “What is your number?”

I nearly fell in the floor laughing.

Jo worked for Congressman Sonny Callahan of Mobile for 18 years. And when Sonny retired in 2002, Jo was elected to replace him. He stepped down in 2013 to take a position at the University of Alabama.

As we say in Red Level, “Kay, you done good.”

 

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Opinion | Down the home stretch

Bradley Byrne

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Some of the greatest sporting events in history have come down to the wire. Those bottom of the ninth, fourth and inches, double overtime plays are what stand out in our memories as the greatest successes or the worst defeats in sports history.

Similarly, we here in Washington are entering our own home stretch of the 115th Congress. It has been a long year filled with many victories for the people of Alabama, but there is still work to be done.

Next year, the game will change completely. With Democrats taking control of the House, things will be different.

Where bipartisan progress can be made, we must take advantage of it. Instead of being the “resistance,” we should be the loyal opposition. Loyal to the country but opposing policies and ideas that do not match up with our conservative values and beliefs.

I promise you two things that won’t change no matter who is in charge of the House: I will put Alabama’s priorities first, and I will support President Trump and his pro-America agenda.

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For now, the next two weeks will be like the bottom of the ninth in Washington. We still need to pass a Farm Bill that works for our Alabama farmers and foresters, ensure the national flood insurance program continues, pass a funding bill for the remaining portions of the federal government, and protect our Southern border.

As I have said before, our farmers are our future. Without the tireless efforts of farmers all across the nation, life as we know it would not exist. I am hopeful we can pass a strong Farm Bill by the end of the year to provide greater protections for Alabama farmers and ensure benefits for rural America.

The flood insurance program is very important for those of us in coastal Alabama, and I want to see the program reformed and strengthened in a way that protects our coastal communities. We cannot let the program expire, so I will be pushing hard to get the program reauthorized.

Similarly, we must work to fund the remainder of the federal government. We currently have around three-quarters of the government funded for next year, including the critical funding needed to rebuild our military. This was the first time in a decade that we have been able to reach this point on time and in a bipartisan way.

Now, we must address funding for agencies like the Department of Justice, Department of Agriculture, and the Department of Homeland Security. I want to see a funding bill that reflects the need to rein in wasteful spending while also supporting programs and projects important to Alabama.

It is imperative that any funding bill also help secure our southern border. It is clear that our immigration system is broken, and we must fix it. First, however, we must build President Donald Trump’s border wall and stem the flow of illegal immigration.

I have a solution to provide funding for the wall: the 50 Votes for the Wall Act. By using the budget reconciliation process, we can avoid Democrat obstruction in the Senate and secure the funds necessary to complete this task. I hope my colleagues will make the right decision for the country and bring my bill up for a vote.

These next two weeks will be the last play of a tough-fought game. As we near the goal line, I am committed to trying to get a few more wins for Alabama and America before the next Congress starts.

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Opinion | The prospective gassing of human beings in Alabama is an abomination

Stephen Cooper

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When, in October 2016, I wrote “[d]eath row inmates in Alabama are human guinea pigs” because the state’s capital punishment regime — specifically its barbaric, often bungled lethal injection protocol — is already so dark, so depraved, so outrageously cloaked in lies and officious secrecy, I never could have predicted the situation could get worse. But it has.

In glaring contrast to the heavily circulated, smiling picture of exonerated former Alabama death row inmate Anthony Ray Hinton, ebullient after voting for the first time in a midterm election since being freed in 2015, after a hellacious 30 years on Alabama’s death row, it’s important to understand: the death penalty in Alabama has gotten far worse since Mr. Hinton’s release — not better.

First, because of the cynically named “Fair Justice Act,” convoluted legislation hacksawing fundamental constitutional rights of (overwhelmingly indigent) death-sentenced defendants, signed into law last year — over the varied, vociferous, published objections of the ACLU, a highly respected Harvard Law School professor,defense attorneys in the state, myself, and even Mr. Hinton — it is far easier under current Alabama law, for an innocent person like Mr. Hinton, to be convicted and sentenced to death.

Second, despite a fairly recent slew of patently botched lethal injections, including that of Ronald Bert Smith,Torrey McNabb, and Christopher Brooks — as well as the bloody, horrific, and failed execution attempt of Doyle Hamm, during which, among other atrocities, state executioners repeatedly (and futilely) jabbed multiple needles into Hamm’s groin and pelvis — Alabama has coldly, inhumanely, and, as I wrote elsewhere in June, steadfastly continued “its odious tradition of ducking and dodging transparency and accountability in how the state puts its prisoners to death.” I’d presaged this discomfiting conclusion several months earlier, in October 2017, in a piecefor USA Today, after McNabb’s shameful, gruesome torture; in it, I dubbed the Commissioner of Alabama’s Department of Corrections (ADOC) “‘Baghdad Bob’ of Alabama’s death row.”

Pouring accelerant on this already demoralizing and distasteful dumpster fire, a just-released report by the Death Penalty Information Center (DPIC), “Behind the Curtain: Secrecy and the Death Penalty in the United States,” observes: “Alabama has one of the most restrictive secrecy policies in the nation, consistently maintaining that all documents associated with an execution are confidential.” (While he wasn’t focusing on the modern death penalty, in reviewing W. Fitzhugh Brundage’s new book “Civilizing Torture: An American Tradition” for the L.A. Times, author Colin Dickey recently and insightfully wrote: “The work of American torture has always been twofold: not just the violence itself, but the complex legal and rhetorical strategies that obfuscate it away to maintain a myth of America as a civilized place without cruel and unusual punishment.”)

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And now, as if this wasn’t all ghastly enough — this undeniable fact Alabama has been torturing poor people for a long time, and that it shows no sign of stopping — the Montgomery Advertiser’s Bryan Lyman wrote on November 23rd that the state is planning to augment the barbarism involved in its executions to even greater and more unseemly dimensions; Lyman reports that plans are now underway for Alabama to develop a protocol to execute death row prisoners with nitrogen gas.

But, Lyman notes, because “[n]itrogen asphyxiation has never been used in capital punishment before,” Alabama “finds itself inventing a method of execution.” Soberly and pointedly, Lyman observes: “The American Medical Association authorizes the use of the method in animal euthanasia, though only for birds and small animals.” Relatedly, in March, Robert Dunham, Executive Director of DPIC, tweeted: “The World Society for the Protection of Animals lists nitrogen inhalation as ‘not acceptable’ for animal euthanasia because loss of consciousness is not instantaneous, and dogs euthanized by nitrogen gas have been observed convulsing and yelping after ‘falling unconscious.’”

Also in March, following Alabama’s vengeful killing of an 83-year-old man, I urged that during such dreary, desolate days for death penalty abolitionists, unusually sage insight, and perhaps also, the solace of understanding, can be gleaned from the words of writer James Baldwin. The same is true today as more and more developments emerge about the prospective state-sanctioned killing of human beings with nitrogen gas in Alabama — and even more depressingly, in other states like Oklahoma and Mississippi (which have approved the procedure), too.

In his essay “What Price Freedom,” Baldwin postulated: “I still believe when a country has lost all human feeling, you can do anything to anybody and justify it, and we do know in this country we have done just that.” Borrowing from Baldwin further, and speaking directly to Alabama’s Attorney General’s Office and the ADOC, Baldwin concluded, in yet another one of his piercing essays “The Uses of the Blues,” that “[i]n evading [death row prisoners’s] humanity, you have done something to your own humanity.”

But, last time when I wrote how James Baldwin’s writing helps us to understand the continued dastardly use of the death penalty, I also wrote about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and, I let Baldwin get the last word; this time, it’s with the power of Dr. King that I’ll close. Because it was Dr. King who, from his humble pulpit on Dexter Avenue in Montgomery, Alabama, began a nonviolent movement in this country — a movement for justice, for equality, for humanity, a movement for the betterment of all mankind — a movement that continues to this day.

In his book “Why We Can’t Wait,” Dr. King wrote these hallowed words, words that all Alabamians, and indeed all Americans, still have not fully internalized, accepted, and allowed to become part of our baseline morality: “Man was born into barbarism when killing his fellow man was a normal condition of existence. He became endowed with a conscience. And he has now reached a day when violence toward another human being must become as abhorrent as eating another’s flesh.”

With the prolonged picking and poking of condemned prisoners with needles, the “choice” of electrocution, and now, perhaps, also nitrogen gassing, we’re not there yet. Not even close.

 Stephen Cooper is a former D.C. public defender who worked as an assistant federal public defender in Alabama between 2012 and 2015. He has contributed to numerous magazines and newspapers in the United States and overseas. He writes full-time and lives in Woodland Hills, California. Follow him on Twitter @SteveCooperEsq

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Lowell Barron Responds to Official Dismissal of Charges

by Lee Hedgepeth Read Time: 1 min
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