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APR stands by Rogers report

Bill Britt

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By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

An article published by The Alabama Political Reporter (APR) has drawn fire from campaign operatives for freshman Senator Luther Strange and his attorney at his old law firm, Bradley Arrant.

An email containing a letter from Bradley partner Joseph B. Mays, Jr., was received by APR on June 30, in which he demands, “…removal and retraction of false and libelous statements in an article on your website titled, ‘Source: State Rep. Offered Superfund Bribe with Strange Present.'”

SEE LETTER HERE

The story revolves around a Federal probe that ensnared former State Rep. Oliver Robinson, who earlier this month reached a plea agreement to Federal charges of fraud, bribery, corruption, and tax evasion. The agreement is related to Robinson allegedly accepting bribes from a powerful Birmingham law firm, Balch Bingham. According to the release, Robinson was paid to advocate against the expansion of a massive EPA Superfund site in Birmingham. Balch Bingham’s client, Drummond Coal, and its affiliate ABC Coke would have potentially had to pay millions for the cleanup. A Balch attorney and a Drummond executive are both listed as unindicted co-conspirators in the release from the US Attorney’s Office in Birmingham.

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Last year, shortly after Robinson resigned from the Alabama House of Representatives, claiming a conflict of interest (because his daughter was working for then-Governor Robert Bentley), State Rep. John Rogers began telling how the same people had approached him as Robinson, but that he turned them down.

During the beginning days of the 2017 Legislative Session, Rogers approached APR with this story. But as there was no context from which to draw a conclusion or make a printable narrative, Rogers allegations stayed mostly within the halls of the State House.

However, in June, Rogers told US Senate candidate Dr. Randy Brinson, who is running against Strange, that he told Federal investigators that Drummond Coal executives offered him a similar deal to Robinson’s. According to Brinson and others present, Rogers agreed to go public with his story at a press conference with Brinson.

After confirming the facts with Rogers and his close associates, APR’s Josh Moon published Rogers’ claims that Strange was present when Rogers received what he believed to be a bribe offer from those acting on Drummond’s behalf.

An email to Strange’s Senate and campaign spokesperson, Shana Teehan, by APR the evening before the Moon story, was to be published. Teehan, the former Shanna Kluck, was communications director for the Alabama Republican Party under Bill Armistead and has had APR’s email and cell phone contact for years. APR has received countless emails from Teehan as Strange’s Senate Communications Director and as campaign staff.

A quick check of my APR email shows 14 emails from Teehan from June 1 until June 28 with well over two dozen pages of emails from her.

In a statement, Strange’s operatives said, “As Alabama’s Attorney General, Sen. Strange led the National fight against the over-reaching Obama EPA in order to protect jobs in Alabama and across the country. The allegations in Josh Moon’s article are simply not true and smack of the same fake news that President Trump and Jeff Sessions are dealing with. As shown by the recent Veritas videos exposing CNN, too many in the media are unaccountable and have dropped all pretense of having standards, abusing and using the First Amendment as a cover for lying about their political enemies and boosting their ratings.”

Strange’s office didn’t send the statement to APR even though they regularly carpet bomb its email with press reports. A quick check of [email protected] finds 14 emails from Teehan from June 1 until June 28. Both she and Strange have my cell number, and I have theirs, but no calls were made to refute the story.

The day following our report on Rogers’ allegation, he began to backtrack by saying Strange had not been present at the meeting in which be believed he was offered a bribe.

On June 30, just 24 hours after APR’s first report, Moon revealed that Rogers had confirmed the original report but Rogers had asked that his confirmation statements not be made public until he could “tell all” on a local Birmingham radio show that Friday.

Strange’s high-powered Bradley Arrant lawyer wrote APR saying, “the fact that it was published without confirmation from the key source – Rep. Rogers – suggests on its face that your actions were malicious. These facts indicate that you intentionally published these false and defamatory statements or, at the least, that you published them with a reckless disregard for their falsity.”

The original report was confirmed with Rogers, before publication, it was checked with several individuals who Rogers had told the same story that he told APR during the 2017 Session.

Of course, none of this has stopped Strange from claiming “fake news” on Yellowhammer Radio.

This is the same Luther Strange who as Attorney General claimed he never “said” there was an investigation into Gov. Robert Bentley just before Bentley appointed him Senator. There was an investigation and he knew it. The same man who recused himself from the Speaker Mike Hubbard investigation because he took money from Hubbard’s Political Action Committee and then within 24 spent the same amount with one of Hubbard’s business interests. Hubbard, the former Speaker of the House, who was convicted of 12 counts of public corruption. However, as Attorney General, Strange allowed his Chief Deputy Kevin Turner to collude with others on his staff to derail Hubbard’s prosecution. Turner now serves as Strange’s chief of staff.

It is not yet clear if Rogers lied to APR and to others, or if he is lying now. Rogers claimed Strange was present when he was offered what he considered a bribe. Then he changed his story to Strange not being present. By the end of last week, Rogers was denying everything, telling WSFA News, “No, he was not there and there was no bribe. I haven’t talked to Drummond Coal either. That is not true. That is not true.”

 

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Bill Britt

Opinion | Reading right, left and center

Bill Britt

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Since its inception nearly eight years ago, the Alabama Political Reporter has worked to inform, educate, alert and, on occasion, call to action its readers on a wide variety of political issues facing our state.

APR’s focus is state politics and those things that make our state better.

Along with in-depth reporting on policy, the politicos that drive it and public corruption that harms, we strive to be a marketplace for ideas across the broad spectrum of right, left and center.

In today’s hyper-polarized political environment, allowing all voices to have a say isn’t always a popular consideration. We live in a time where some people would rather have their personal beliefs confirmed than actually educate themselves on a given subject. And heaven forbid that an opinion writer should challenge a prevailing thought or party.

At APR, we test the status quo, not to be arbitrary, but to move the conversation forward. It is easy to embrace the state’s current path of mediocracy, but that is not our purpose. We report news that matters, even if it is uncomfortable or casts a less than flattering light on things.

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Like the lone pamphleteers who forged our nation, we work to shape the discourse with fact-driven reporting and provocative thought.

There are plenty of blogs and news outlets that parrot the company line.

One of our goals is to cause people to think. But thinking is hard work and can make us uncomfortable. But the news itself can cause discomfort because it makes us face unpleasant realities.

When we find that more children in Alabama are living in poverty today than in 2000, it should make us not only uncomfortable, it should call us to action.

Report: More children are living in poverty in Alabama in 2018 than in 2000

Similarly, when the state’s Ethics Commission becomes a law unto itself acting outside the bounds of statute to please a handful of special interests, good citizens and honest lawmakers should be outraged.

Opinion | Terminal corruption and its accomplices

These are issues that should know no label because poverty, corruption and its brothers are what keeps a state from prospering.

But with the growing polarization of political discourse, often the things we can change are left undone because we can’t listen over the din of noise and anger about who’s right and who’s wrong.

President Ronald Reagan said, “There is no limit to the amount of good you can do if you don’t care who gets the credit.”

Former Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Tip O’Neill said, “All politics is local,” but over the last two decades with the rise of cable news local politics became nationalized.

A Reuters Institute survey released last year found a rising polarization in news consumption in the United States.

Of those surveyed, 51 percent of left-leaning Americans trust the news while only 20 percent of right-leaning Americans say the same.

Self-identified conservatives are far more likely to say they avoid the news because “I can’t rely on news to be true,” as reported in Forbes.

Forbes also reports, “Conservatives’ skepticism is nurtured by their deep, almost exclusive, commitment to Fox News. Two-thirds of conservatives watch Fox News, and an increasing number, 19 percent, visit the ultra-right wing site Breitbart.com.”

Progressive studies show those who identify with liberals turn to CNN and MSNBC, or the New York Times, but are not as brand loyal as their counterparts.

Sadly, opinions have been so manipulated by national cable news we can’t talk about the problems facing our state with any degree of civility on the right or the left.

When hot-button issues with little relevance to the future of our state replace honest policy discourse, we are in trouble because there is no demand for a plan on how we should govern. Also, when talking-points generated by bloviating commentators pose as an actual conversation, we have no real basis from which to began to determine our course of action to improve our state.

Once there was an intellectual underpinning to conservatism as well as liberalism. Sadly today, thinking is almost a lost art in the political arena.

Alabama’s challenges are homegrown and so should be its solutions.

APR promises to remain a part of the conversation that looks to make our state even better. We will continue to look at the hard facts so that our readers can make the tough choices – be they right, left or center.

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Bill Britt

Opinion | The people have a right to know if their attorney general is a cheat

Bill Britt

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If there is a shred of integrity left at the Alabama Ethics Commission, it will immediately convene an emergency hearing to settle the issues of whether the State’s Attorney General Steve Marshall violated campaign finance laws.

For nearly three months, the commission has failed to rule on whether Marshall knowingly ignored the state’s Fair Campaign Practice Act in taking $735,000 in illegal contributions from the Republican Attorneys General Association. RAGA is not registered with the state and commingles its funds with other political action committees, masking the donors contrary to Alabama law. Ethics Commission Executive Director Tom Albritton knows Marshall’s contributions were unlawful, so does Secretary of State John Merrill, but no one is willing to act. Even Marshall himself is on the record saying the type of contributions he received from RAGA are illegal and banning such contributions was, “the only legal protection standing between Alabama voters and the reality or appearance of quid pro quo corruption.”

Perhaps the larger question for the Commission and the Alabama Republican Party is should a candidate who willingly takes illegal campaign contributions be allowed to remain on the ballot?

In the least, the voters in Alabama have a right to know if the Republican nominee for the state’s top lawyer violated the law.

The primary function of the state’s attorney general is to represent the state in legal matters, protect the people and seek out and prosecute public corruption.

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The Ethics Commission must call a special hearing to address the allegation against Marshall before the Nov. 6 election.

If the commission refuses to act, it will confirm it is merely an extension of the political corruption that plagues our state.

Ethics Director Albritton and Secretary Merrill have made it clear in statements and previous writings that Marshall’s acceptance of the RAGA funds is an unlawful act.

Merrill, in 2015, asserted out-of-state PAC contributions made to an Alabama candidate are illegal if the PAC is not fully compliant with Alabama laws which require registration and full disclosure of its donors.

RAGA is not registered in Alabama, and its donors are not immediately disclosed under Alabama law because it accepts PAC-to-PAC transfers which mask the original donors.

Secretary of State’s letter addressed out-of-state PACs meddling in Alabama elections

For his part, in June, Albritton told al.com that he had informed other campaigns that similar donations would not be legal.

Merrill and Albritton make it evident that Marshall’s acceptance of the RAGA funds is a violation of the state’s campaign finance laws.

On too many occasions, the Commission has bent to the narrow interests of well-connected individuals or the broad considerations of powerful special interests. For once, it should look to protect the state’s voters from an attorney general who would skirt campaign laws for personal gain.

The right remedy in the Marshall situation lies with the Alabama Republican Party, which is responsible for pursuing such violations and taking appropriate action, but the so-called party of law and order has taken a pass on the Marshall fiasco, choosing to remain silent.

Republican Party Chair Terry Lathan and the Executive Committee could end the charade by immediately moving not to certify Marshall’s votes in the upcoming general election. Of course, this would mean conceding the race to Democrat Joe Siegelman. This might not be palatable, but how much more bitter is a win by cheating?

Since the party will not act on the issue, it falls to Ethics Commission Chairman Judge Jerry Fielding who can swiftly move to bring the Marshall matter before the Commission.

For years, Fielding enjoyed a sterling reputation as a respected jurist, but slowly over time, his willingness to allow questionable compromise on the Ethics Commision has taken the shine off his former standing. Marshall’s case is an opportunity for Judge Fielding and the entire commission to affirm the rule of law applies to everyone, even an appointed attorney general.

It is now time for the commission to act because the people have a right to know if their attorney general is a cheat.

 

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Bill Britt

Opinion | Terminal corruption and its accomplices

Bill Britt

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There is at present a deliberate, brazen unraveling of the Republican’s signature 2010 legislation on ethics. Bastardization of the laws are not only happening at the so-called Alabama Ethics and Reform and Clarification Commission, but it’s also taking place at the state’s Ethics Commission where a group of appointed individuals are interpreting ethics and campaign finance statutes in a way never intended by the Legislature.

But perhaps this shouldn’t surprise anyone who understands the true state of politics in Alabama. What is shocking is that so many good people are saying nothing about what is happening at these commission meetings.

At its most recent hearing, the Ethics Commission showed its willingness to place cronyism over the rule of law when in a 3-0 vote (with two abstentions), the Commission voted to give itself the authority to reduce the number of offenses levied against candidates and political action committees (PACs) that violate campaign finance reporting rules, according to a report by APR‘s Josh Moon.

Ethics Commission gives itself more power to reduce penalties for campaign law violators

Routinely, the commission has exercised its power to reduce or dismiss civil penalties for campaign finance violations, but now it has taken an extraordinary step to reserve power to itself in determining what may rise to the level of a criminal offense.

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Commission chairman Jerry Fielding noted that no-one from the attorney general’s office or the district attorney’s association had voiced any concerns about changes the commission was making to the law, but is that really the case or is there something more sinister afoot?

Appointed Attorney General Steve Marshall currently has an ethics complaint pending before the commission. Marshall, during the Republican primary, took $735,000 in contributions from the Republican Attorneys General Association, in what is widely believed to be an illegal campaign contribution. However, the commission decided not to weigh-in on Marshall’s case until after the fall elections. Has Marshall purposefully withheld any critical comments about the commission’s ruling to curry favor or not anger the commission that might soon charge him with violating campaign finances laws? Marshall, for all his aw-shucks demeanor, is a calculating politician who will sacrifice anything that stands in the way of him remaining attorney general – a job he claims God gave him. Perhaps Marshall needs reminding that his position was given to him by disgraced Gov. Robert Bentley who by his actions has proven he has little in common with the Almighty.

Marshall, along with Ethics Commission Executive Director Tom Albritton, are chairing the Alabama Ethics and Reform and Clarification Commission, which was created to give the Legislature cover for when they abolish the ethics laws the Republicans passed in 2010. After eight years, which brought about numerous indictments and scandals, the Republican leadership has determined that the rules are just too rigid. So, under the guise of clarification, they will gut the laws during the upcoming legislative session.

Several individuals close to the process and one person who sits on the commission express grave concerns and even disgust at how blatantly the new rules will undercut the laws championed in 2010. As one individual said, “All is lost.” Far from hyperbole, these individuals sincerely believe that the commission will present a reform package that will not just undermine current laws but will open broad avenues for legal public corruption within the state.

Often the words ethics and morals are used synonymously, but they are quite different. Ethics is a set of rules that govern conduct in the workplace, an organization or government. Morals, on the other hand, are personal beliefs of right and wrong which are part of an individual’s character.

Many of our elected officials and others who make their living from politics place personal gain over any other guiding principle. Perhaps therein lies the problem.

Strong ethics laws enacted by corrupt individuals will not last long, and so after eight years, we see that many in Republican leadership never intended to live by the rules they championed when they took office.

As for the Ethics Commission, it is terminally corrupt without even a pretense of acting ethically.

The state is in dire need of those who realize that those who do not fight corruption are in fact accomplices.

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Bill Britt

Opinion | I dare you

Bill Britt

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In a recent interview with the Jasper-based Daily Mountain Eagle, Republican Lt. Gov. nominee Will Ainsworth said, “I’m tired of Alabama being last in important areas such as education, and I’m tired of our politicians on both sides being embarrassments to our state.”

In one sentence, Ainsworth captures the feelings of a majority of Alabamians who want to see our state succeed.

Our state is at or near the bottom in every meaningful measure of success.

It’s not that the state’s political class wants the state to fail, but they are unwilling to do the things necessary for it to succeed.

Our people as a whole are undereducated, underemployed and unhealthy, and yet the state’s politicians are more interested in the next elections than in the next generation; they’re more concerned about appealing to the base-voter than doing what is best for every citizen.

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We should do better; we can do better, but will we?

While rummaging around the local library as a young boy, I found a book entitled “I Dare You.” The book was written in 1931, by William H. Danforth, the founder of Ralston Purina whose familiar checkerboard logo was inspired by Danforth’s belief that an individual’s physical, mental, social and spiritual life should be balanced. Danforth’s concept is to be a healthy and productive person, you need the four squares to stay in balance so that no one aspect of your life is not developed at the expense of another.

“You have a four-fold life to live: a body, a brain, a heart, and a soul…these are your living tools. To use and develop them is not a task…It is a golden opportunity,” wrote Danforth.

Two passages in particular set me on a course in life that I still pursue today. The first was: “I dare you, boys and girls, to make life obey you, not you it. It is only a shallow dare to do the foolish things. I dare you to do the uplifting, courageous things.”

The second was: “I dare you to think bigger, to act bigger, and to be bigger. I dare you to think creatively. I dare you to lead and inspire others. I dare you to build character. I dare you to share. And I promise you a richer and more exciting life if you do!”

Imagine if you will what could occur if our state’s political leadership followed Danforth’s advice.

Public service was once considered a noble calling, but today, a career politician is often seen as a corrupt, money-grubbing fool, whose sole purpose is personal gain. While this is not true of all politicians, there are plenty that fit the description.

As Danforth understood, character, a moral center and a devotion to ideals greater than one’s self were vital to living an honest life.

There is a particular type of political atheism that says the end justifies the means. However, no unjust act can be justified merely because it produces a satisfactory outcome. This is indeed true in life and politics.

Recently, I received a mail piece in which a candidate who is running in his first election repeatedly lies about his opponent. I’ve met the candidate whose name is on the mailer, and there is no way he concocted these lies on his own. No, a paid political consultant furnished him with the deceptive lines of attack, and he took them. How is this individual now fit for office? If a man or woman is willing to lie for a job in any field, that is a disqualifier, and particularly so in public service.

Ainsworth says he’s tired of our state being behind and tired of politicians on both sides of the aisle being embarrassments. Maybe Ainsworth will use his bully pulpit to demand more of our state’s elected officials.

The problem is leadership.

Governments are run by people. If those individuals lack character, commitment and vision, then the results are the kind we see here in Alabama.

Perhaps in an age where private morality and public conduct are no longer considered one in the same, Danforth’s little book will seem quaint. In a time when preachers sermonize about morality in the pulpit but ignore it at the ballot box, Danforth will seem a bit out-of-date.

But as a teenage boy, his words inspired me as they do today.

It costs 99 cents for an online version at Amazon.

Danforth said a more abundant and more exciting life comes to those who dared to build character, think bigger, inspire others and share.

This may be true of governments, as well.

I dare you.

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APR stands by Rogers report

by Bill Britt Read Time: 5 min
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