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Should Superintendent Sentance be fired?

Craig Ford

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By Rep. Craig Ford

On Thursday, the State Board of Education will meet to discuss terminating State Superintendent Michael Sentance’s contract.

Politics has surrounded Sentance’s time in Alabama, starting even before he was hired. And if the Board decides to fire him, his supporters will claim that politics was the driving factor.

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Sentance was the preferred choice of those who support charter schools and diverting tax dollars away from public schools to fund scholarships for private schools. And with his job on the line, most – if not all – of those who have publicly supported him have been those who support charter schools and the Accountability Act scholarship program.

If Sentance is fired, his supporters will blame the “education establishment” for opposing anyone who wants change. In fact, they’ve already had some editorials published in local papers.

But politics and opinions about education policy shouldn’t have anything to do with whether Sentance gets to keep his job. The time for that debate was before he was hired. Now he is a state employee, and he should be judged solely by how he has conducted himself as an employee.

So let’s look at this case based solely on the merits.

The first charge against Sentance comes from his attempt to get rid of the Office of Career Technical Education and Workforce Development, and place it under the Office of Academic Affairs. That move would have also meant eliminating the deputy superintendent position that is in charge of Career Tech Education.

Sentance made these plans without the consent of the Board, or even taking the time to tell the Board members what he was doing. When his plans became public, the Board members were caught by surprise when their offices started getting calls from the press and concerned educators demanding answers that Board members didn’t have because they had been left in the dark.

A second charge against Sentance comes from when the Department of Education posted incorrect graduation numbers on their website, once again catching Board members and school administrators off guard when they began getting calls from parents and the press. Sentance failed to take responsibility, and instead he blamed his staff.

While a staff member may have been responsible for the error, when you are the person in charge, the buck stops with you. Sentance never really took responsibility for the error, and that is unacceptable.

The third charge against Sentance comes from his handling of the state takeover of the Montgomery Public School system. When Board members began to get questions and phone calls about the takeover, they requested a list of names, titles, dates of hire and current salaries and sources of salary funding connected to the Montgomery school intervention.

This request was reasonable, but Sentance’s response was not. His exact words were, “…you have sought to interject yourself again into the operations of the district, it is time to stop.”

In other words, he told the Board members to mind their own business and get out of his way.

I own an insurance agency. If I had an office manager who began making drastic changes to how my office worked without telling me, then found out that office manager had allowed my customers to be given false information and blamed other employees instead of taking responsibility, and then, when I confronted that office manager, they told me to stop questioning them and get out of their way, that office manager would be fired immediately.

But there’s a fourth charge against Sentance: mismanaging public funds.

Recently, the news broke that the Department of Education is going to be over budget by at least $3 million, and that $3 million happens to coincide with a $2.9 million spike in salary expenses for the coming year. Most of that salary spike comes from consultants and administrators he hired as a part of the Montgomery school system takeover, as well as other high-level hires he made at the state Department of Education.

So, Sentance has failed to communicate adequately with his employer, been disrespectful and insubordinate to his employer, failed to take responsibility for his office’s actions and mismanaged public funds.

Whatever your thoughts are about education reform and charter schools, there is no denying that Sentance deserves to be fired based solely on these failures as an employee.

I do not sit on the Board of Education, so I do not have a say in this decision. But by any reasonable definition, there is more than enough justification for the Board of Education to terminate Sentance’s contract.

Rep. Craig Ford represents Gadsden and Etowah County in the Alabama House of Representatives. He served as the House Minority Leader from 2010-2016.

Rep. Craig Ford is an Independent who represents Gadsden and Etowah County in the Alabama House of Representatives. He served as the House Minority Leader from 2010-2016.

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Guest Columnists

Opinion | House passes VA bill, funds Choice Program

Martha Roby

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The U.S. House of Representatives recently passed S. 2372, the VA MISSION Act, taking another critical step towards fulfilling our promise to make the Department of Veterans Affairs work for the men and women who have selflessly served our great nation. I was proud to support the legislation, and I am very pleased that it addresses a number of important pieces of the large VA puzzle.

First and foremost, the VA MISSION Act extends and makes permanent funding for the VA Choice Program that many veterans depend on to receive care. You may have heard that Choice funding was set to expire at the end of May, and this bill prevents that from happening. In both densely populated and rural states alike, it can be very challenging for the VA medical centers to properly care for all veterans in a timely fashion, particularly when specialists are required. The Choice Program is an attempt to bridge this gap by allowing veterans to access private-sector care at VA expense if they have to wait longer than 30 days for a VA appointment or if they live more than 40 miles from a VA health care facility. It has been recorded that 550,000 veterans have used Choice so far this year, and in 2017, 14,790 Alabamians enrolled. Therefore, I am extremely glad that the House has taken action to ensure that this important program is funded.

Secondly, the VA MISSION Act expands the VA’s Post-9/11 Caregiver Program to include veterans of all eras. Currently, only caregivers of veterans from the post-9/11 era are eligible for monthly stipends through the VA, and I believe expanding this program to caregivers of veterans from all eras will help ensure that more veterans receive the help they need.

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Finally, officials at the VA have said that their current physical footprint includes “hundreds of outdated or obsolete facilities,” and many of these facilities are often not in close proximity to large veteran populations. This is a gross waste and misuse of precious resources. Congressman Phil Roe, the Chairman of the House Committee on Veterans Affairs and author of the VA MISSION Act, said he believes a process free from bureaucratic politics is needed “to fix the massive and misaligned footprint” of the VA. The bill directs President Trump to establish a team to review the current VA operations across the country and make recommendations about ways we can modernize, improve, and streamline facilities and the services they provide. We can do better than this for our veterans, and I believe we will.

Before the House voted on the bill, 38 veterans groups issued a letter of support for the legislation and called it “a major step towards making improvements to and investments in the VA health care system… so that veterans have access to care when and where they need it.” I agree, and I believe this bill will improve the lives of veterans. Fortunately, I believe the Senate will act quickly on this important piece of legislation, and the President has suggested he will waste no time signing it into law.

You know as well as I do there’s no “quick fix” for the problems plaguing the VA – of course, I wish there was. Nonetheless, I will continue to support commonsense measures like the VA MISSION Act to deliver positive change for veterans. I have heard from countless veterans in Alabama’s Second District about the continued need for VA changes to improve the care they receive. We owe the men and women who have served our country the absolute best care possible, and I won’t stop fighting to achieve this. I hope we will soon see the VA MISSION Act signed into law.

Martha Roby represents Alabama’s Second Congressional District. She lives in Montgomery, Alabama, with her husband Riley and their two children.

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Guest Columnists

Opinion | Appreciation for law enforcement

Bradley Byrne

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Each day, law enforcement officers leave the safety of their homes not knowing if they will pass back through their own front doors at the end of the work day.  They leave their families behind to ensure the safety of our loved ones at schools, in neighborhoods, and on the roadways.  There is never enough we can do to show our appreciation for their work.

These men and women often go far beyond their official job descriptions.  Even when they are not wearing the uniform, law enforcement officers play a significant role in our neighborhoods, schools, and churches.  They even serve as positive role models for our children.

 I have had the chance to ride along with some of our local law enforcement officers and witness firsthand the challenges they face on the job.  Law enforcement officers encounter dangers on the job that do not exist in other professions.  It shocked me to realize that even a task as routine as a traffic stop can turn hostile, and in some cases, even deadly.

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That is why each year we celebrate National Police Week, which gives us an opportunity to reflect on the hard and dangerous work our nation’s law enforcement officers do daily.   Police Week attracts people from across the country to our nation’s capital for memorial services, parades, and vigils in honor of our men and women in blue.

Police Week also serves as a time to pay our respects as a nation to those whose end of watch came too soon.  I recognized National Police Week by speaking on the floor of the House of Representatives to honor these brave men and women and remember the life of one of our very own who was killed in the line of duty just four months ago.

Mobile Police Officer Justin Billa paid the ultimate sacrifice after being shot and killed while responding to a domestic violence call on February 20th, 2018.  In such a time of immense grief, we saw our community rally together to support the family and friends of fallen Officer Billa.  The impact of his death was felt throughout the United States, as officers and first responders from across the country traveled to Mobile to pay their respects.

To remember our fallen heroes and honor all of those in law enforcement, the House of Representatives passed several pro-law enforcement bills last week.

The Protect and Serve Act of 2018 toughens federal penalties against people who intentionally target law enforcement officers in attacks, including ambushes.

Additionally, we passed the Justice Served Act of 2018, which provides funds to prosecute cold cases that are solved by breakthrough DNA evidence, including backlogged rape kits.  This bill will strengthen our criminal justice system by making sure that newly-tested evidence is used to prosecute unsolved cases, thus ensuring violent criminals are brought to justice.

From legislation to prevent attacks on our officers to providing funding for additional resources, we are working to ensure these dedicated individuals have the tools they need to do their jobs and keep us safe.

Let us not forget that we sleep soundly at night due to the sacrifices our law enforcement officers make out on the streets.  We owe these individuals far more than our thanks for the services they provide.

I ask you to join me in showing your appreciation for the law enforcement officers in Southwest Alabama for living a life of service. May we honor them each and every day.

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Guest Columnists

Opinion | Let’s get our facts straight on the bridge

Tony Kennon and Robert Craft

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It’s always amazing how some people can misinterpret the facts. A case in point is the recent controversy over the proposed coastal bridge in Baldwin County. It’s hard for us to comprehend the opposition because we live here.

Opponents have deemed it a “bridge to nowhere,” but that couldn’t be further from the truth, because the Gulf Coast is Alabama’s largest economic engine. There isn’t a place in Alabama that contributes more tourism revenue than the cities of Gulf Shores and Orange Beach. Check our state budgets for the revenue we contribute. Check the studies performed to assess our economic impact to the state. This new bridge is headed to the future of our state.

The fact is, we are at capacity in our transportation system with the exception of a toll-paying option for a privately-owned, unregulated bridge many motorists aren’t willing to choose. Drivers will approach that toll bridge, but then cut across to Highway 59. That was fine when we had 10,000 to 15,000 visitors a day, but now those numbers are increasing at an overwhelming rate. Today, traffic is backing up through Foley toward Summerdale putting traffic at a standstill during peak seasons.

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This can have a damaging impact on state revenue because, not only does congested traffic make our visitors less likely to return, but we can’t grow our capacity when the transportation infrastructure won’t handle the load. Their “bridge to nowhere” is our bridge to the future.

Those few who oppose it say there haven’t been enough studies and that it hasn’t been proven to be in the public interest. We would invite anyone with any concern to take a ride to our beaches. They are welcome to study the parking lot called Highway 59. Approaching the cities of Gulf Shores and Orange Beach, they will witness the traffic bottleneck caused by a bridge which is woefully over capacity.

Building a bridge wasn’t our first option. There was an attempt to purchase the existing toll bridge. But, why would we want to pay more for a bridge than we could build a new one ourselves?

And speaking of the bridge owners, let’s get down to who’s really opposing this project. Outside of a handful of local residents, the real opposition comes from the toll bridge company. After previous liquidation and bond actions, their investors want to get their money back. They have launched an ambitious, but misleading, campaign to stop the project so they can sell their bridge for hundreds of millions in taxpayer money.

These bridge owners want to attack this project as not being in the public interest. Let’s be honest with ourselves, who really thinks the bridge owners have the public interest at heart? Furthermore, when the public drives on Highway 59 or the proposed new coastal bridge, that is without a doubt a public interest.

As elected mayors, we’ve both served our communities for over a decade. And as such, we know what is in the public interest. There is no need for additional studies. We’ve listened to the travelers and our residents who must navigate our congested roads. We realize there is a desperate need for infrastructure expansion to move the growing traffic to and from the cities of Gulf Shores and Orange Beach. Doing so will improve the daily lives of our local citizens and entice our guests to return for years to come. And, it will create more and more revenue for the State of Alabama.

It’s time to put the wishes of the driving public first. And, it’s time to look after the interests and needs of those who live on the Gulf Coast and the millions who visit here every year.

 

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Should Superintendent Sentance be fired?

by Craig Ford Read Time: 4 min
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