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Feds may be least of “Bad Jack’s” worries

Bill Britt

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There are two members of the Alabama House of Representatives who go by the name Jack; one is Vestavia Hills Republican Jack “J.D.” Williams, AKA “Bad Jack” among his colleagues, and then there is Wilmer Republican lawmaker Jack W. Williams called “Good Jack.” Earlier this week, Bad Jack Williams was indicted on federal conspiracy charges.

Few embraced disgraced former Speaker of the House Mike Hubbard more than Williams, who, like Hubbard, has entered into questionable business transactions involving lobbyists. Williams, also like Hubbard, appears to have used his office for personal gain. If any of this is true, then Williams has more headaches to come.

Even before Bad Jack was charged in a federal conspiracy case along with his longtime associate, former Chair of the Alabama Republican Party Marty Connors, it was widely suspected that he was running afoul of state ethics laws.

As far back as 2015, the Alabama Political Reporter tracked questionable actions that Williams undertook while serving in the Legislature.

Williams made headlines in 2014, when he used his office as a legislator to build support to return the University of Alabama Birmingham Blazers football program, which had been canceled by the university’s board. An outspoken critic of the university’s cancelation of the football program, Williams made frequent appearances on radio, television and in print demanding the return of UAB football. However, he never made known the fact that he was personally profiting from the team through ownership of UAB sports fan-based message board, Blazer Sports Report.

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Williams’ website is part of the Rivals.com network of websites dedicated to covering college athletics. Yahoo! acquired the Rivals network of websites in 2007, for an estimated $100 million.

On March 19, 2015, Williams introduced HB 341, which would have required the University of Alabama system to establish and maintain a football program at the UAB campus. Although the bill had 38 co-sponsors, the bill failed to make it out of the Education Policy Committee.

Under pressure in June 2015, UAB announced it would reinstate its football program beginning in the 2017 season.

Did Rep. Jack Williams Use His Office For Personal Gain?

In another 2015 report, APR found that Williams, beyond his involvement with the return of UAB football while operating a fan website dedicated to UAB athletics, also appeared to be on the payroll of a company run by a registered lobbyist.

At the time, Williams’ Alabama Legislature’s online biography said he “currently serves as the director of Development for Aldridge Gardens.” An October 2013 press release announced Aldridge Gardens hired Tynette Lynch as its chief executive officer. Tynette Lynch is a registered lobbyist for Pat Lynch & Associates, a lobbying firm headed by her husband and veteran lobbyist, Pat Lynch.

Breaking Investigative Report: More Potential Problems for Rep. Jack Williams

Williams’ public disclosures with the Alabama Ethics Commission shows he did not work at Aldridge Gardens in 2010, but began working there at some point during 2011, and was no longer working there in 2014.

Over the years, Williams’ statement of economic interest filing has shown an inconsistent employment record listing several different consulting jobs and business ventures.

In 2011, Williams reported outside income of $50,000 to $150,000 from a company called The Jefferson Group. By 2012, The Jefferson Group is no longer listed on his ethics disclosures.

The Jefferson Group, LLC, is a single-member limited liability company, wholly owned by JWA, LLC. JWA, LLC, was formed in 2005, and while its formation documents conspicuously fail to list any members of JWA, LLC, the signature at the bottom of the formation documents, while difficult to read, looks remarkably like it is signed “Jack D Williams.” The Secretary of State’s filings indicate the stated purpose of The Jefferson Group, LLC, is to “service a portfolio of tax liens/investment services.”

This entity was formed for this purpose after Jack Williams had spent the years of 1995 to 2003, as the Jefferson County tax collector.

In 2014, a Jefferson County Circuit Court entered a judgment against The Jefferson Group, LLC, in the amount of $4,937,990 in favor of Cadence Bank.

Few championed the cause of freeing Hubbard more than Williams. From organizing a letter to the Obama Administration’s Attorney General Loretta Lynch for pushing legislation to aid Hubbard, it has been Williams who has fought so faithfully for the convicted felon.

What’s happening with Jack?

In late 2015, Williams was reportedly active in raising funds for Hubbard’s legal defense. It was believed that he and Hubbard’s attorney, Rob Riley, were soliciting donations for the fund shortly after Hubbard’s attorney, J. Mark White, withdrew from the case allegedly due to Hubbard’s failure to pay over one million dollars in legal fees.

Williams also sponsored a bill to make such a defense fund legal under State statutes.

Furthermore, it was Williams who solicited House members’ signatures on a letter calling for a federal investigation of Attorney General Luther Strange and Deputy Attorney General Matt Hart. U.S. Attorney Beck responded to the letter at a rare press conference, highlighting the irony of predominantly white, majority Republican lawmakers pleading with the Obama Administration to intervene in the Hubbard case.

Williams currently faces federal legal jeopardy, and if the state has kept tabs on APR’s reporting over the last several years, there may be cause to think the feds are the least of Bad Jack’s worries.

Williams and Connor say they are innocent.

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House

Speaker McCutcheon hospitalized with heart issue

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Alabama Speaker of the House Mac McCutcheon announced on Friday that he has been hospitalized with a heart issue and expects to be released following treatment over the weekend.

“Deb and I appreciate the prayers of healing that so many have made on my behalf, and I am well on the road to recovery,” McCutcheon said. “Tests indicated that I had a blocked blood vessel in my heart, which resulted in the fatigue and shortness of breath that I felt, and the issue will be treated with simple medication.”

While returning home from the legislative orientation session at the Alabama State House on Thursday, McCutcheon suffered mild chest pains and shortness of breath and was driven to an emergency room for examination.

McCutcheon said he first assumed he was suffering from a case of bronchitis, but an EKG indicated a heart issue, which blood tests later confirmed.

His physician recommended a heart catheterization, and those results showed a blood vessel had closed but did not require a stent and could be treated with medication.

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During his recovery, the speaker said he will continue working on House committee assignments and other legislative issues in preparation for the upcoming organizational and regular sessions of the Alabama Legislature.

During the 2014 legislative session, McCutcheon underwent heart bypass surgery and returned to work before the session’s end.

 

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Courts

Attorney general’s office will prosecute Hoover mall shooting cases

Brandon Moseley

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Attorney General Steve Marshall said his office will take over prosecuting the Nov. 22, 2018, shootings of E.J. Bradford, Brian Wilson and Molly Davis at Hoover’s Riverchase Galleria Mall.

Marshall notified Jefferson County District Attorney Danny Carr (D) that he is assuming prosecution of the cases after the admission by District Attorney Carr in a letter to Attorney General Marshall of the presence of potential conflicts between himself and key parties in the cases. Attorney General Marshall noted that the conflicts warrant recusal under the National District Attorneys Association’s National Prosecution Standards.

“I have reviewed your December 11th letter regarding your prosecutorial role in the shooting death of Emantic ‘E.J.’ Bradford, Jr.,” Attorney General Marshall wrote District Attorney Carr. “Based on the information you provided in that letter and our multiple conversations on the subject—particularly your acknowledgement that ‘a fair-minded, objective observer could conclude that a conflict exists’—I have determined that the National Prosecution Standards dictate your recusal from the investigation of each of the shootings that occurred in the Riverchase Galleria on Thanksgiving night, not just E.J. Bradford’s.”

“While I have no reason to believe that you are actually biased or compromised, I agree that other fair-minded persons might question your neutrality based on the information that you provided in the letter and during our private conversations,” Marshall said. “For example, you state that the officer who shot Mr. Bradford is either the charging officer or a witness in approximately 20 cases pending in your office. A fair-minded Defendant (or family member) in those cases could question whether you and/or your prosecutors are biased in favor of protecting the officer from prosecution because the officer’s testimony may be important in his or her case. On the flip side, you acknowledge personal relationships with some of the protestors who are calling for the officer who shot Mr. Bradford to be criminally prosecuted, which could lead a fair-minded person to question your bias in favor of indictment. I have weighed these factors and others mentioned during our conversations and agree that, when taken as a whole, these factors warrant recusal under Rule 1-3.3(d).”

National Prosecution Standards rule 1-3.3(d) dictates that:

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The prosecutor should excuse himself or herself from any investigation, prosecution, or other matter where personal interests of the prosecutor would cause a fair-minded, objective observer to conclude that the prosecutor’s neutrality, judgment, or ability to administer the law in an objective manner may be compromised.
Attorney General Marshall also notified Carr that his office would also prosecute the shootings of Brian Wilson and Molly Davis.

“Your letter requests guidance on the ‘officer-involved’ shooting of E.J. Bradford; it does not mention the shootings of Brian Wilson and Molly Davis,” Marshall concluded. “However, it is my understanding that all three shootings were part of a single chain of events. Thus, the investigation of Mr. Bradford’s shooting is inextricably intertwined with the investigation into the shootings of Mr. Wilson and Ms. Davis and must be conducted by the same entity. Accordingly, to guard against inconsistent prosecutorial decisions, you must also excuse yourself from those investigations.”

According to police accounts, a 21-year-old Hueytown man, Emantic “E.J.” Bradford Jr., and his friend Brian Wilson, age 18, were at the Hoover Riverchase Mall on Thanksgiving night. A scuffle broke out with some other individuals over some sale priced shoes. A gun was drawn and a shooter shot Brian Wilson. A bullet also struck 12-year-old Molly Davis, who was there shopping with her grandmother, in the back. At some point in all of this, Bradford also pulled a weapon. An off-duty uniformed Hoover Police Officer who was working security for the Galleria rushed to the scene. He saw Bradford with a gun and shot him. Bradford died from his wounds. Twenty-year-old Erron Marquez Dequann Brown has since been arrested for shooting Wilson.

Attorney, Ben Crump has been retained by the Bradford family. Crump says that an independent review of the autopsy results indicate that the officer shot Bradford in the back three times. According to Crump, there are witnesses that claim that the officer never identified himself before opening fire on Bradford.

Hoover police wrongly identified Bradford as the mall shooter in the hours after the incident. Investigators realized that was not the case after it was determined that the bullets that were cut out of Wilson could not have come from Bradford’s gun. The Hoover police officers has not yet been formally identified by authorities.

A number of protestors are blaming Hoover for all of this and has been attempting to interfere with businesses and shoppers in the weeks since the shooting. The Alabama Law Enforcement Agency is investigating the case.

Steve Marshall is a former district attorney in Marshall County. He was recently elected to his own term as attorney general.

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Featured Columnists

Opinion | Trump’s con game is almost over

Josh Moon

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It’s all true.

All of the rumors. All of the speculation. All of the oh-my-God-have-you-heard-about whispers.

All of it is true.

All of the things that Donald Trump and his administration and family have been accused of doing … they actually did them. All of them.

Even the really dumb ones.

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Even the really awful ones.

They did it all.

Oh, listen, I know that the typical Alabama conservative voter has zero idea what I’m talking about right now, because they have so fully wrapped themselves in the protective bubble of conservative opinion sources that they’re still talking about the Clinton Foundation. But I don’t care.

Because this isn’t speculation. Or partisan hopefulness. Or ignorant accusations.

This is under oath.

And right now, after the last two weeks, here’s what people under oath, facing the penalty of perjury and providing supporting evidence and documentation, have said about the conman you people elected president: He has lied repeatedly. He has directed illegal payments. He has sought to cover up affairs. He has bought off a tabloid. At least 14 members of senior campaign staff were in contact with Russians. And Trump — or “Individual 1,” as he’s known in court filings these days — was involved in it all.

Trump’s personal attorney has now been convicted and sentenced to three years in prison for a crime personally directed by the president.

That makes five — FIVE! — of Trump’s top aides or attorneys who have struck deals with Robert Mueller and are now working with the broad investigation into possible (certain) Russian interference and collusion.

And it doesn’t stop there.

Trump’s personal businesses are also under federal investigation. His campaign staff’s use of funds is now under federal investigation. And most of his immediate family is under investigation.

And absolutely none of this should be a surprise to anyone.

Because all of you should have known well before this clown was elected president that he is nothing more than a two-bit conman with an ego large enough to fill a stadium and less shame than a 90-year-old stripper.

You should know because we told you. We, the media. The actual media.

We wrote story after story on this crook and his shady business dealings — how he rarely paid his bills, how he left working men holding the bill, how he created a scam college to bilk poor people out of money, how he skirted laws and tax codes constantly and how he gamed the system over and over again to stay wealthy using taxpayer money.

All of it was right there for anyone to read.

But a good portion of this country didn’t care. They were too caught up in this buffoon making jokes and calling people names and kicking people out of rallies and saying offensive things. He catered to white men and claimed he could fix any problem just by saying he could fix any problem.

And they bought it. Just like the conman planned. You didn’t even make this dude show you his tax returns!

And the white, working-class folks are still buying it. Which would make sense if he had done even one thing to help them.

But he hasn’t.

His economic policies have been a disaster, especially for the people of Alabama. And his tough talk has produced zilch in the way of foreign respect, better trade deals, lower prices for consumers or more American jobs. In fact, we’ve lost respect, have worse deals and higher prices and companies are still moving American jobs to other countries.

And yet, the supporters remain.

I don’t understand it. But you know what? I don’t have to understand it for much longer.

The walls are quickly closing around the conman president. Soon, the rest of Mueller’s investigation will drop, and the indictments will roll out. The full breadth of the Trump administration’s illegal acts will be laid out for Congress to see. Given what we already know from the few filings that have been made public, this will not go well for Trump and his closest associates.

I do not expect the Trump supporters to ever admit they were wrong.

But if there is justice in this world, and if the indictments break just right, those supporters will have to deal — at least for a brief period — with the two words that could make this whole thing almost worth it.

President Pelosi.

 

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Aerospace and Defense

Jones appointed to powerful Senate Armed Services Committee

Chip Brownlee

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After a brief stint with no representation on the powerful Senate Armed Services Committee, Alabama is back in the mix.

U.S. Sen. Doug Jones has been appointed to the influential committee tasked with overseeing the nation’s armed forces, national security and military research and development. Jones will assume his position on the committee when the 116th Congress convenes in January.

Alabama is home to five military bases, which employ 8,500 active-duty service members and more than 23,000 civilians. With Jones’ appointment, Alabama will regain some representation for the aerospace industry in Huntsville and the shipbuilding industry in Mobile, both of which have deep ties to the military.

In 2017, the Department of Defense spent $7.7 billion on contracts in Alabama. Alabama hasn’t had any representation on the committee since Republican Sen. Jeff Sessions left the Senate to become attorney general and his temporary replacement, Luther Strange, lost the Republican primary to Roy Moore.

More than 375,000 veterans, including 65,000 retirees, live in Alabama.

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“Alabama and its citizens have long played a significant role in our national defense, from building or maintaining ships and other vehicles to leading cutting-edge research and development to volunteering to serve in our armed forces,” Jones said. “It is vital that we have a voice on the Senate Armed Services Committee, a role that I am honored to be able to fill in the next Congress.”

Jones said he is committed to serving as Alabama’s advocate for a strong national defense, which also means a strong and prosperous economy in our state.

“I look forward to working with Chairman Inhofe and Ranking Member Reed to advocate for our service members and their families, and for a robust national defense posture that protects our interests at home and abroad,” Jones said.

Democrats had to fill three seats on the committee after losing three of the senior Democrats who were serving there. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Florida; Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Missouri; and Sen. Joe Donnelly, D-Indiana, all lost their re-election to the Senate, leaving a gaping hole for the Democrats. Sen. Jack Reed, D-Rhode Island, is the highest-ranking Democrat on the committee.

“Senator Jones is a tremendous advocate for Alabama and a true champion for our service members and their families,” Reed said. “I am pleased to welcome him to the committee and know he’ll continue working on a bipartisan basis to help keep America strong militarily and economically.”

Jones will remain on the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, where his office says he will continue to advocate for improved access to health care and quality educational opportunities for Alabamians.

Jones will also continue to serve on the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs and the Senate Special Committee on Aging. He will no longer serve on the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

 

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Feds may be least of “Bad Jack’s” worries

by Bill Britt Read Time: 4 min
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