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Realtors make endorsements

Brandon Moseley

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Tuesday, May 15, the Alabama REALTORS® Political Action Committee (ARPAC), the political arm of the Alabama Association of REALTORS®, announced its endorsement of candidates for the primary elections to be held on June 5, 2018.

ARPAC said in a statement that the candidates endorsed exhibit a commitment to home ownership, private property rights, economic growth and development.

ARPAC Trustees Chair Kim Hallmark said in a statement, “We are proud to endorse each one of these candidates. They recognize the vital role REALTORS® play in promoting our state and helping grow thriving, safe and sustainable communities.”

“These candidates understand what Alabama needs to continue to grow, to create jobs and opportunities and reach its full potential,” said Jeremy Walker, Alabama REALTORS® Chief Executive Officer. “This pro-business, pro-growth focus will help advance the real estate market, and in turn, provide opportunities for our members to help more Alabamians experience home ownership and everything our great state has to offer.”

For Governor ARPAC endorses Governor Kay Ivey.

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For Lieutenant Governor ARPAC endorses Twinkle Cavanaugh. Cavanaugh is currently the Public Service Commission President.

For State Treasurer ARPAC endorses John McMillan. McMillan is currently the Commissioner of Agriculture and Industries.

For Alabama Public Service Commission, Place 1, ARPAC endorses incumbent Jeremy Oden (R).

For Alabama Public Service Commission, Place 2, ARPAC endorses incumbent Chris “Chip” Beeker Jr. (R).

For the Alabama Senate, ARPAC endorses:

District 1: incumbent Tim Melson (R-Florence)
District 2: Tom Butler (R-Madison)
District 3: incumbent Arthur Orr (R-Decatur)
District 4: incumbent Paul Bussman (R-Cullman)
District 5: incumbent Senate Majority Leader Greg Reed (R-Jasper)
District 6: incumbent Dr. Larry Stutts (R-Tuscumbia)
District 7: Sam Givhan (R-Huntsville)
District 8: incumbent Steve Livingston (R-Scottsboro)
District 9: incumbent Clay Scofield (R-Arab)
District 11: incumbent Jim McClendon (R-Springville)
District 12: incumbent Senate Pro Tem Del Marsh (R-Anniston)
District 13: Randy Price (R-Opelika)
District 14: incumbent Cam Ward (R-Alabaster)
District 15: Dan Roberts (R-Birmingham)
District 16: incumbent Jabo Waggoner (R-Vestavia Hills)
District 17: incumbent Shay Shelnutt (R-Trussville)
District 18: incumbent Rodger Smitherman (D-Birmingham)
District 19: incumbent Priscilla Dunn (D-Bessemer)
District 20: incumbent Linda Coleman-Madison (D-Birmingham)
District 21: incumbent Gerald Allen (R-Tuscaloosa)
District 22: incumbent Greg Albritton (R-Bay-Minette)
District 24: incumbent Bobby Singleton (D-Greensboro)
District 26: John Knight (D-Montgomery)
District 27: incumbent Tom Whatley (R-Auburn)
District 28: incumbent Billy Beasley (D-Clayton)
District 29: Donnie Chesteen (R-Geneva)
District 30: incumbent Clyde Chambliss (R-Prattville)
District 31: incumbent Jimmy Holley (R- Elba)
District 32: Chris Elliot (R-Daphne)
District 33: incumbent Vivian Davis Figures (D-Mobile)
District 34: Jack Williams (R-Wilmer)
District 35: David Sessions (R-Mobile)

For the Alabama House of Representatives, ARPAC endorses:

District 1: incumbent Phillip Pettus (R-Killen)
District 2: incumbent Lynn Greer (R-Rogersville)
District 4: Parker Moore (R-Decatur)
District 5: incumbent Danny Crawford (R-Athens)
District 7: Proncey Robertson (R-Decatur)
District 8: incumbent Terri Collins (R- Decatur)
District 9: Scott Stadthagen (R-Hartselle)
District 10: incumbent Mike Ball (R-Madison)
District 11: incumbent Randall Shedd (R-Cullman)
District 12: incumbent Corey Harbison (R-Cullman)
District 13: incumbent Connie Rowe (R-Jasper)
District 14: incumbent Tim Wadsworth (R-Arley)
District 15: incumbent Allen Farley (R-McCalla)
District 16: incumbent Kyle South (R-Fayette)
District 18: Jamie Kiel (R-Russellville)
District 19: incumbent Laura Hall (D-Huntsville)
District 20: incumbent Howard Sanderford (R-Huntsville)
District 21: Rex Reynolds (R-Huntsville)
District 22: incumbent Ritchie Whorton (R-Owens Cross Roads)
District 23: incumbent Tommy Hanes (R-Bryant)
District 24: incumbent Nathaniel Ledbetter (R-Rainsville)
District 25: incumbent Speaker of the House Mac McCutcheon (R-Huntsville)
District 26: incumbent Kerry Rich (R-Guntersville)
District 27: Wes Kitchens (R-Arab)
District 29: incumbent Becky Nordgren (R-Gadsden)
District 31: incumbent Mike Holmes (R-Wetumpka)
District 32: incumbent Barbara Boyd (D-Anniston)
District 33: incumbent Ron Johnson (R-Sylacauga)
District 34: incumbent David Standridge (R-Hayden)
District 35: incumbent Steve Hurst (R-Munford)
District 36: incumbent Randy Wood (R-Anniston)
District 37: incumbent Bob Fincher (R-Woodland)
District 38: Debbie Wood (R-Valley)
District 39: TJ Maloney (R-Heflin)
District 40: incumbent K.L. Brown (R- Jacksonville)
District 41: incumbent Corley Ellis (R-Columbiana)
District 42: incumbent Jimmy Martin (R-Clanton)
District 43: incumbent Arnold Mooney (R-Indian Springs)
District 44: incumbent Danny Garrett (R-Trussville)
District 45 incumbent Dickie Drake (R-Leeds)
District 46: incumbent David Faulkner (R-Birmingham)
District 47: David Wheeler (R-Vestavia)
District 48: incumbent Jim Carns (R-Birmingham)
District 49: incumbent April Weaver (R-Alabaster)
District 50: incumbent Jim Hill R-Moody)
District 51: incumbent Allen Treadaway (R-Morris)
District 52: incumbent John Rogers (D-Birmingham)
District 53: incumbent Anthony Daniels (D-Huntsville)
District 55: incumbent Rod Scott (D-Fairfield)
District 56: incumbent Louise Alexander (D-Bessemer)
District 57: incumbent Merika Coleman (D-Birmingham)
District 58: incumbent Rolanda Hollis (D-Birmingham)
District 59: incumbent Mary Moore (D-Birmingham)
District 60: incumbent Juandalynn Givan (D-Birmingham)
District 62: incumbent Rich Wingo (R-Tuscaloosa)
District 63: incumbent Bill Poole (R-Tuscaloosa)
District 64: incumbent Harry Shiver (R-Bay Minette)
District 65: incumbent Elaine Beech (D-Chatom)
District 66: incumbent Alan Baker (R-Brewton)
District 67: incumbent Prince Chestnut (D-Selma)
District 68: incumbent Thomas Jackson (D-Thomasville)
District 69: incumbent Kelvin Lawrence (D-Hayneville)
District 70: incumbent Chris England (D-Tuscaloosa)
District 71: incumbent A.J. McCampbell (D-Livingston)
District 72: incumbent Ralph Howard (D-Greensboro)
District 73: incumbent Matt Fridy (R-Montevallo)
District 74: incumbent Dimitri Polizos (R-Montgomery)
District 75: incumbent Reed Ingram (R-Montgomery)
District 76: incumbent Thad McClammy (D-Montgomery)
District 79: incumbent Joe Lovvorn (R-Auburn)
District 80: incumbent Chris Blackshear (R-Phenix City)
District 82: incumbent Pebblin Warren (D-Tuskegee)
District 84: incumbent Berry Forte (D–Eufaula)
District 85: incumbent Dexter Grimsley (D-Newville)
District 86: incumbent Paul Lee (R-Dothan)
District 87: Jeff Sorrells (R-Hartford)
District 88: Al Booth (R-Prattville)
District 90: incumbent Chris Sells (R-Greenville)
District 92: incumbent Mike Jones (R-Andalusia)
District 93: incumbent Steve Clouse (R-Ozark)
District 94: incumbent Joe Faust, (R-Fairhope)
District 95: incumbent Steve McMillan (R-Bay Minette)
District 96: Matt Simpson (R-Mobile)
District 97: incumbent Adline Clarke (D-Mobile)
District 98: incumbent Napolean Bracy (D-Mobile)
District 100: incumbent Speaker Pro Tem Victor Gaston (R-Mobile)
District 101: incumbent Chris Pringle (R-Mobile)
District 102: Willie Gray (R-Citronelle)
District 103: incumbent Barbara Drummond (D-Mobile)
District 104: incumbent Margie Wilcox (R-Mobile)
District 105: Chip Brown (R-Mobile)

For the Alabama Supreme Court, ARPAC endorses:

Supreme Court Chief Justice: Lyn Stuart
Place 2 Associate Supreme Court Justice: Tommy Bryan
Place 3 Associate Supreme Court Justice: Will Sellers
Place 4 Associate Supreme Court Justice: Jay Mitchell

For the Alabama Civil Court of Appeals, ARPAC endorses:

Place 1 Court of Civil Appeals Judge: Michelle Manly Thomason
Place 2 Court of Civil Appeals Judge: Terri Thomas
Place 3 Court of Civil Appeals Judge: Terry Moore

For the Alabama Criminal Court of Appeals, ARPAC endorses:

Place 1 Court of Criminal Appeals Judge: Richard Minor
Place 2 Court of Criminal Appeals Judge: Chris McCool
Place 3 Court of Criminal Appeals Judge: Bill Cole

For the State Board of Education, ARPAC endorses:

Place 2: Tracie West
Place 6: incumbent Cynthia McCarty

The Alabama Association of REALTORS® (AAR) is the largest statewide organization of real estate professionals comprised of over 15,000 members from 26 boards and 1,200 real estate companies.

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Parker: If leftists “take over our courts. All is lost”

Brandon Moseley

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Tuesday, Associate Justice Tom Parker (R) denounced the attacks on Judge Brett Kavanaugh as a “smear mob.” Parker also denounced Senator Doug Jones (D) for his efforts to stop the imminent confirmation of Kavanaugh.

“If they take over our courts, all is lost,” Justice Parker said. “That’s why I have been outspoken about efforts by billionaire George Soros and groups like the Southern Poverty Law Center to remove and defeat conservative judges and stack the courts with leftist judges.”

Parker is the Republican nominee for Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice in November’s general election.

Parker described Jones and other Democrats trying to delay this justice’s confirmation as a “smear mob” trying to bring down a distinguished jurist. Parker denounced Jones’ calls for a delay in the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings because of allegations of sexual abuse while Kavanaugh was a teenager.

Parker pointed out that there are no witnesses supporting the accusers stories from the 1980s and that none of this ever came up during Kavanaugh’s FBI background check or the hearing process.

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“This is nothing more than a brazen last-ditch attempt by a left-wing smear mob to stop the President’s nomination through the politics of personal destruction, and people see right through what they’re trying to do,” Justice Parker said. “And to no one’s surprise, Doug Jones is right there with the rest of that mob. It’s sad.”

“Once there was a time when Alabama sent honorable Democrats to the Senate like Jim Allen, for whom I interned in college, who put principle ahead of party and did the right thing for Alabama and America,” Parker said. “But that Democratic Party exists no more.”

“Sadly, today’s Democratic Party has been taken over by radical extremists with masks on their faces and fists in the air — an angry bunch whose only agenda is to resist, delay and obstruct everything our president is doing to turn our nation around,” Parker continued. “Senator Jones’s partisan call for delaying a hearing that has already gone on long enough is just one more example of their obstructionism and gridlock.”

Parker said that Democrats are dividing America to advance their radical left “progressive” agenda.

On Thursday, Brett Kavanaugh will get to defend himself against the allegations before the Senate Judiciary Committee. His first accuser, Christine Blausey Ford, is expected to also testify. Republicans hope to have a vote on Kavanaugh’s confirmation as soon as next week.

In 2016 Chief Justice Roy Moore (R) was suspended for the remainder of his term. Associate Justice Lyn Stuart (R) assumed the role of interim Chief Justice. When Moore retired to run for U.S. Senate in 2017, Alabama Governor Kay Ivey (R) appointed Stuart as Chief Justice. Parker defeated Stuart in the June Republican primary despite being outspent.

Parker faces Jefferson County Judge Robert Vance III in the November general election.

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Jefferson County Police Chiefs Association endorses Anderton

Brandon Moseley

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Tuesday, the Jefferson County Police Chiefs Association announced that it is endorsing Republican DA Mike Anderton in the highly competitive Jefferson County District Attorney race.

Association President and Irondale Chief of Police Ken Atkinson announced the endorsement, stating that his organization had full confidence in Anderton’s ability to lead the District Attorney’s office.

“It’s very humbling to have the backing of an organization I’ve admired for a long, long time,” Anderton said. “I’ve worked with these officers for many years, and their dedication to their communities is outstanding. It’s tremendous to be appreciated by them with this endorsement.”
The Jefferson County Police Chiefs Association represents some 26 municipalities across the county.

Anderton is a career prosecutor who has worked in the Jefferson County DA’s office for 34 years.

Anderton has already been endorsed by the Alabama Citizens for Life, the oldest and largest Pro-Life group in Alabama, the Jefferson County Farmers Federation, and the Alabama Republican Assembly during the GOP primary season.

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Anderton was appointed Jefferson County District Attorney by Gov. Kay Ivey in 2017 when the post became vacant after the incumbent, Charles Todd Henderson (D), was convicted of perjury. Anderton has been working in the Birmingham DA’s office since 1984. He faces Danny Carr (D) who is also a career prosecutor. Carr was the interim DA after Henderson was indicted by a grand jury on the perjury charges and served until after Henderson’s conviction. The general election will be held on November 6.

Jefferson County has been trending Democratic in recent elections. Democrats hope that they can take control of all the countywide offices in Jefferson County as well as the legislative delegation in this election.

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Opinion | Walt Maddox has lost his mind

Josh Moon

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Walt Maddox is nuts.

That’s the only explanation I have for what the man’s doing — going around the state and trying to engage voters on the issues. Holding press conferences talking about health care and offering plans for increasing Medicaid coverage.

The guy’s got an infrastructure plan. He’s got an education plan.

He’s got details and costs and information on how we can do it all and actually pay for it.

And this nonsense is what he believes will get him elected governor.

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See? Nutty as a fruitcake, that Walt Maddox.

Because Alabama voters do not care about such trivial things as an improved quality of life, better education for their kids and increased job opportunities that actually pay you enough to live and eat.

They don’t care.

Trust me on this. I’ve been banging my head against this particular wall for all of my life.

I screamed and screamed and screamed some more over Medicaid expansion under Obamacare. I pointed out the benefits and the zero costs. And I pointed out the meticulous studies done that showed massive increases in jobs, revenue and health services if that expansion occurred.

You know what people cared about?

That it was named after the black president.

That’s right. This bunch of hillbillies would rather drive across two counties while suffering a heart attack than give the “libs” the pleasure of knowing that their health care plan wasn’t terrible.

Oh, but that’s not even the most mind-boggling conversation I’ve had with Alabama voters.

That honor goes to anyone opposing gambling.

This is inevitably the dumbest debate. Because it starts with a flawed premise — that any lottery or gambling bill passed in the state — like the one Maddox is proposing — would “bring gambling to Alabama.”

I was in one of the three legally operating casinos in this state a month ago. I’ve known people who place bets with bookies or on online gambling sites. I’ve attended cash bingo games where thousands of dollars changed hands. I’ve bet on both dogs and horses, legally. And I’ve stood in line just across the borders in Tennessee, Georgia and Florida to buy lottery tickets.

Gambling has been here for decades now. The only thing we don’t have are the tax revenues that are paying for other states’ kids to attend colleges, eliminating other states’ food taxes and helping fund thousands of classrooms in other states.

But the voters here, they don’t care.

That’s why they keep electing goobers who vote against even allowing Alabama citizens to vote on the issue. Because democracy is great unless the majority is going to agree on something you don’t like.

This is the reality facing Walt Maddox, as he travels around the state on a bus, trying to pretend that Alabama voters know that a governor can’t influence either abortion laws or gun laws, but can ensure their children get to see a doctor this year.

The voters in this state are so unconcerned with the issues that they don’t really care if Kay Ivey ever debates Maddox. Because, honestly, they’d rather not know that she has no ideas, can’t think on her feet and can’t lead in a crisis.

It’s much easier to not know. To just vote blindly for the GOP candidate, convinced that it’ll all work out eventually (even though it never, ever has).

Walt Maddox foolishly believes that he can reason with these people, that at some point their sense of self-preservation will kick in, that they’ll grow tired of remaining stuck living paycheck to paycheck, that the GOP corruption will finally chase them to at least consider another option.

Basically, what I’m saying, is that Walt Maddox is nuts.

 

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Alabama Hospital Association pushes for Medicaid expansion, backs candidates who do not

Bill Britt

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According to a recent AP report, the Alabama Hospital Association has launched a campaign to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. However, the organization is supporting Republican candidates who are either trying to kill the law altogether or refuse to expand its coverage in the state.

The association has so far this election cycle given nearly $20,000 each to appointed Attorney General Steve Marshall and Gov. Kay Ivey. Marshall and Ivy, both Republicans, owe their current offices to disgraced former Gov. Robert Bentley.

Marshall is actively using his office to abolish the law that provides health care for low-income Alabamians and is currently suing to overturn provisions that allow individuals with pre-existing conditions to not be denied health coverage.

Ivey for her part falls back on the standard line that the state can’t afford to expand Medicaid and has also signaled that she will not support the expansion sought by the Hospital Association.

Danne Howard, executive vice president and chief policy officer for the Alabama Hospital Association, told AP’s Kim Chandler, “One in every ten people who walk into a hospital doesn’t have insurance. At some point, those providers, those hospitals, are not going to be able to maintain operation. They are not going to be there, either closing their doors or cutting back services.”

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Howard expressed the need to expand Medicaid to AP but has failed to answer APR‘s question as to why the organization is supporting candidates who oppose expansion.

Democrat gubernatorial candidate Walt Maddox has promised to expand Medicaid if elected governor, likewise, Democrat attorney general nominee Joseph Siegelman vows to protect Alabamians with pre-existing conditions should he win in November. The Hospital Association isn’t supporting either candidate even though their campaign platforms align with the association’s stated goals.

Since Howard refuses to answer APR‘s request for information, there is no way to understand why the Hospital Association would back Ivey, who has said she would not support expanding Medicaid and Marshall who is actively working to end guaranteed coverage for those with pre-existing conditions.

According to The American Journal of Managed Care, “Medicaid expansion… was associated with increases in coverage, service use, quality of care, and Medicaid spending. Among those who benefitted the most are adults without a college degree, patients with cancer, and patients with diabetes.”

If Marshall prevails with his current lawsuit, Alabamians with cancer, diabetes and other pre-existing conditions would no longer have guaranteed access to health insurance.

Current law allows states to expand Medicaid eligibility to non-elderly adults with incomes up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level.

Howard says that there is a real possibility that doctors and hospital care will not be available if Medicaid does not expand, yet, her association is financing candidates whose goals are to stop expansion and cut options for those who have persistent medical problems.

 

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Realtors make endorsements

by Brandon Moseley Read Time: 5 min
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