Former U.S. Attorney Doug Jones wins Senate race; first Democratic win since 1992

December 12, 2017

By APR Staff
Alabama Political Reporter

Alabama elected its first Democratic senator in over two decades Tuesday after a grueling seven-month long election cycle.

Doug Jones, a former U.S. attorney, faced a great challenge in overcoming the deficit polling between him and his opponent, former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore. Jones trailed Moore for most of the campaign according to RealClearPolitics, which averages polls across various firms and media outlets.
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Democrat Doug Jones leading Roy Moore by 10 points in Fox Poll as surveys diverge

December 11, 2017

By Chip Brownlee
Alabama Political Reporter

With less than 24 hours to go until polls open in the Senate special election, a new Fox News Poll shows Democratic candidate Doug Jones with a sizable 10-point lead over Republican Roy Moore.

The poll, released Monday morning, shows Jones with consolidated support among Democrats, a large lead among independents and one-in-10 Republican voters crossing over to vote for the former U.S. attorney. Such a coalition has been the hope of Jones’ camp since the race began.

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Waiting for the postmortem analysis of Tuesday’s Senate election

December 11, 2017

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

In the distant future, cooler heads will perhaps give a detailed examination of this U.S. Senate race to determine the postmortem of the news media, political parties and the body politic as a whole. Any reasonable person will look back and see this was a moment in time with no winners, only losers.

When The Washington Post story broke about Moore’s alleged sexual behavior on November 9, I asked APR’s staff to closely diagram the report because over the coming weeks I believed it would be difficult to determine facts from lies. And as one accuser became two and two became nine, and sexual allegations became pedophilia, the fevered pitch of reporting would leave even the most fair-minded reporter with some measure of confusion.

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Are we rubes who cannot read nor count?

November 27, 2017

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

National opinion writers, network talking heads and even random strangers are slamming Alabama as a clannish bunch of backwoods, inbred rubes simply too dumb to determine who to elect as U.S. Senator on December 12. And even here at home, much of the same criticism is amplified in print, online and even in these pages.

At the Alabama Political Reporter, we allow all voices with few exceptions, but our primary focus is on accuracy in reporting.

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Let me be clear: any impropriety with a child is abhorrent

November 13, 2017

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

As one more accuser steps forward, it is now difficult to see Roy Moore’s path progress in his bid to become a senator from Alabama. There is already too much carnage left in the wake of the allegations against him.

But knowing Moore, he will not stand down. If he quits, he’s admitting guilt. If he stays, it will most likely only get worse for his accusers, the state of Alabama and for Moore and his family. But I don’t think retreat is in his nature.
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Still waiting on answers in ALSDE probes

November 8, 2017

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

Three attorneys for the state’s department of education along with a board member have serious charges pending before the Alabama State Bar Disciplinary Commission over a scheme to deny Dr. Craig Pouncey the superintendent’s  job and yet there has been no response from the bar.

Bar complaints against Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE) board member, Mary Scott Hunter, ALSDE attorneys Juliana Teixeira Dean, James R Ward III, and Susan Tudor Crowther were filed some months ago after an internal investigation. The internal report found Hunter and the three ALSDE lawyer had schemed a smear Pouncey who was a candidate for state superintendent.

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Gov. Ivey addresses state challenges, including prison construction

November 8, 2017

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

Tuesday, Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey spoke to the Workforce Development Council meeting in Montgomery. Afterward, the governor spoke to the Capital Press.

Gov. Ivey said that since she was elevated to the governorship, unemployment has dropped from 5.4 percent to just 3.8 percent – the lowest number in the history of the state. Ivey said that it was a team effort.

Ivey reminded the council that government does not create jobs, it is private companies that do that.

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Stop and think before reposting

November 6, 2017

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

Conspiracies both great and small have staked the political landscape since the dawn of human reason. Conspiracy implies a secret agreement between two or more people usually involving some dark intentions.

Reason, in plain speech, is a cause, explanation or justification for an action. As the Oxford Dictionary explains, “The power of the mind to think, understand, and form judgments logically.” However, to assume that individuals exercise good judgement in all situations is as silly as subscribing a grand scheme to every collaborative effort.

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Self-proclaimed internet sleuth Donald V. Watkins draws fire for “libelous lies”

October 31, 2017

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

According to his Wikipedia page, Donald V. Watkins – born September 8, 1948 – is an American trial attorney, banker and entrepreneur. As of late, Watkins has styled himself as an investigative reporter posting to Facebook. In his latest installment on social media, Watkins accuses Dr. Joe Perkins, founder of Matrix, of potentially criminal activities, along with suggesting the Alabama Political Reporter and the Tuscaloosa News printed pandering dribble with regards to the alleged rape of Megan Rondini.

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Proposed bill would have prevented US Senate Special Election

October 31, 2017

By Chip Brownlee
Alabama Political Reporter

Special elections are costly and turnout is often dismal but giving an appointee the time to settle in Washington can afford them the protective status of incumbency. That was the paradox that Gov. Kay Ivey and her predecessor grappled with in trying to decide what to do about Jeff Sessions’ vacated Senate seat.

A bill pre-filed by Rep. Steve Clouse, R-Ozark, and State Sen. Gerald Dial, R-Lineville, would have preempted that decision and directed the governor to set the election to coincide with the next general election. In the case of Sessions’ seat, Sen. Luther Strange would have gotten 18 months in Washington before facing election.

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