Crenshaw County Republican Party welcomes new elected officials

October 5, 2017

By Staff
Alabama Political Reporter

(Update Thursday, October 5 at 8:05 pm the below event that was scheduled for Friday has been cancelled, and has not yet been rescheduled.)

The Crenshaw County Republican Executive Committee recently welcomed two former Democrat elected officials to the ALGOP: Commissioner Michelle Stephens and Commissioner Merrill Sport.

Crenshaw County Republican Party Chairman William Rayborn made the following statement regarding the new Party members: “The Crenshaw County Republican Executive Committee is excited to welcome Commissioner Michelle Stephens and Commissioner Merrill Sport to the Alabama Republican Party. We look forward to working with this exciting duo of commissioners. Additionally, we look forward to the leadership of our first female Republican commissioner. Both our county and state party members take this opportunity to welcome Mrs. Stephens and Mr. Sport and support their efforts to uphold the values we all share.”

Read More

Ronda Walker launches campaign for Alabama State Senate

June 12, 2017

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

Tuesday, June 6, 2017, the Vice Chairman of the Montgomery County Commission, Ronda Walker (R), announced her candidacy for Alabama State Senate District 25.

Commissioner Walker said in a statement, “Voter trust has been shattered and confidence in State government is at an all-time low. The great State of Alabama is stuck in neutral because elected officials are more concerned about political expediency and keeping lobbyists happy than the good of the state. I am running for the Alabama Senate, because I believe Alabama can and must do better.”
Read More

Gas Tax increase on the fast track in Montgomery

April 12, 2017

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

A number of powerful special interests spoke in favor of House Bill 487, which would raise taxes on the gas and diesel fuel that Alabamians purchase every day to commute to and from work, church, school, and play.

HB487 is sponsored by state Representative Bill Poole (R-Tuscaloosa). Rep. Poole spoke at a public hearing on HB487 in the Transportation, Utilities & Infrastructure Committee.

Rep. Poole told the committee, “This is a very important public policy piece of legislation. I ultimately came to the conclusion that this is the right thing to do for the economy of Alabama.”
Read More

Third Party Candidate Says that Current Ballot Access Laws Limits Choice and Competition

October 6, 2016

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

On Wednesday, October 5, 2016, Constitution Party candidate for the Lee County Commission, Ken Busby issued a statement highly critical of Alabama’s ballot access laws which he says limits choices for voters and the rights of candidates to participate in the political process.

Busby said that Lee County has had two third party candidates run for offices, with zero major party opposition to the incumbent, fail to meet the ballot access requirements, which Busby described as extremely challenging.
Read More

Voters Reject Another Tax Increase

August 19, 2015

 

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

Tuesday, August 18 Jackson County voters went to the polls and rejected pleas by the County Commission for a one percent sales tax increase. 64 percent of the voters voted down the unpopular tax increase.

Alabama Legislators have historically scheduled these kinds of referendums in single issue races where as few a voters as possible are likely to even know there is an election, much less one that raises their taxes.  That way a handful of connected people are usually able to decide the issue (many of them local government employees) because they are the only ones aware of the vote.
Read More

Conservative Group Opposes Tuscaloosa County Bills

May 11, 2015

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

On Wednesday, May 6, the West Alabama Republican Assembly issued a press release objecting to two pieces of local legislation.

Tuscaloosa government officials have asked their legislature to make a sales tax increase, on a tax which was supposed to expire, a permanent tax on the people.

Alabama Assembly President Joshua Wyatt objects and wrote:

“In short, the temporary sales tax is to be made permanent because when is a temporary tax ever good enough? Why have a temporary tax voted on by the people when you can get the elected officials to bypass the people and make a permanent tax? Initially I thought that the schools must be hard up for money and need this permanent tax hike, but upon examination of the financial numbers the schools appear to be well funded and have funds for their proposed projects. They may not have it all upfront, but the temporary sales tax was passed initially so that the entities could prioritize a list of projects and work towards that end. But now it’s been decided that we need to make this tax permanent because the hard working taxpayers aren’t paying enough. On top of that it will be made permanent without one single guideline or requirement. Not one stipulation or approved plan. We are giving the ‘powers that be’ a blank check. Spend it how you like it boys and we the lowly working class stiffs will keep working to give you more. Oh yeah, I forgot the best part. You and I don’t even get a vote on the matter. It was introduced in Montgomery where we now know that common sense has become as rare and elusive as spotting Big Foot knitting a sweater. Thank you West Alabama Delegation. Hey, I’m fair and I’m friendly. If you want to renew the temporary sales tax again for another 10 years put it up for a vote by the people. Don’t sneak it through in Montgomery where we don’t have a chance to vote on it.”
Read More

Committee Gives Favorable Report to Open Meetings Act

March 13, 2015

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

On Wednesday, March 12, the Senate Judiciary Committee gave a favorable report to the Open Meetings Act, S.B. 21. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Cam Ward (R-Alabaster) said that the Senate has worked tirelessly to craft legislation to replace Alabama’s old Sunshine Law after provisions of it were struck down in three court cases. The act passed out of the Senate in the 2014 legislative session but got tied up in the logjam in the House. Without passage of a new open meetings law there is a lot of uncertainty out there.
Read More

© Copyright 2017 Alabama Political Reporter