Bill to make Forever Wild pay property taxes gets favorable report from House committee

February 8, 2018

By Brandon Moseley 
Alabama Political Reporter

Wednesday, the Alabama House State Government Committee voted to give a favorable report to a bill that would make lands held by the Forever Wild program pay property taxes.

The bill’s sponsor is state Government Committee Chairman Mark Tuggle, R-Alexander City.

Chairman Tuggle said that House Bill 362 is a constitutional amendment, so it has to be voted on by the people of Alabama to go into effect.

Read More

Bill to limit Disability exemptions for expensive homes gets favorable report

March 9, 2017

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

Wednesday, February 8, 2017, the Senate General Fund Committee gave a favorable report to a bill that would prevent owners of homes worth over $200,000 from being able to get an ad valorem tax exemption if they become disabled. Senate Bill 226 is sponsored by Senator Trip Pittman (R-Montrose), who chairs the Senate General Fund Committee.

Senator Pittman said, “I had a mayor call me and he had a constituent that was complaining about city services. The mayor got to looking and found that that constituent was exempt from paying property taxes. He looked further and 7 or 8 of the houses in that community were exempt from paying ad valorem taxes. He asked me to bring this bill. What this does is put an assessed value of $200,000 limit on that. I think this is a reasonable. You need to pay for the cost of your governor.”
Read More

Bentley Receives Failing Grade On Fiscal Conservatism From CATO Institute

October 6, 2016

By Chip Brownlee
Alabama Political Reporter

MONTGOMERY—-The Governor’s performance as a fiscal conservative has been graded, and he is taking home a report card with a big fat F.

The right-wing libertarian CATO Institute gave Alabama Governor Robert Bentley an F on his fiscal policy report card for 2016.

CATO ranks every governor in the United States on fiscal policy every other year, giving A’s and B’s to governor’s they deem fiscally conservative and failing grades to governors whom they don’t.
Read More

Commissioner David Black Opposes Colbert County Tax Increase

May 26, 2015

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

Friday, May 21, Colbert County Commissioner, David Black announced that he opposes a proposed 27 percent county property tax increase.  Commissioner Black encourages the voters of Colbert County (excluding the cities of Muscle Shoals, Tuscumbia, and Sheffield) to vote in opposition to the tax increase on Tuesday, May 26.

Commissioner Black said in a statement:

“As a County Commissioner, I oppose the school tax on which citizens will vote this coming Tuesday. Rather than paying higher taxes, I would prefer that we, the citizens of Colbert County, would have a discussion about improving the quality of education.  We should be asking why our schools can’t be amongst the top rated in the state, especially since we already spend over $10K per student, more than 92 percent of counties here in Alabama.  We should be asking to see the current budget, looking at how current dollars are being spent, and how we could improve matters. We should be asking for, and expect, excellence!”
Read More

Opinion: Auburn School Tax Increase Vote Shows that Voters Want Government to Do More With Less

September 25, 2013

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

On Tuesday, Auburn residents rejected calls by the city’s elites for mammoth property tax increases. The referendum shows that the people of Alabama are hostile toward more growth in government and politicians throughout the state of Alabama should take notice of this epic defeat.

Auburn is unique in the state of Alabama in that the largest employer in the city is education. Most Auburn residents know numerous people with doctorates (whether they have their own PhD or not). They (more than most people in Alabama) know the importance of having a strong K-12 education in laying the foundation for a lifetime.
Read More

Anniston Star: The damage of a bad tax policy: State’s low property taxes have helped few and hurt many

December 26, 2011

Earlier this year, a federal judge handed down a ruling in a case brought by parents in two rural Alabama counties. The parents claimed that Alabama’s constitutionally mandated property-tax system, which keeps assessments and revenue down, was created to protect large property holders and limit funding for black schools.

In an 800-page ruling, the judge agreed that the property-tax system set up in the 1901 Constitution was designed to keep taxes low and benefit planters and industrialists with extensive mineral holdings. The judge also agreed that by limiting property taxes, the writers of the Constitution made it difficult, if not impossible, for rural, predominately black schools to receive adequate funding.

However, in what the judge admitted was a disappointing decision to reach, the purpose of the limitation was not to discriminate against black students. The purpose was to protect the pocketbooks of the powerful. What happened to minority children was simply collateral damage.

Read More…

© Copyright 2017 Alabama Political Reporter