Hubbard Continues to Swipe at Judge Walker

August 8, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

MONTGOMERY—In the most recent filing by convicted felon and former Speaker of the House, Mike Hubbard, he continues to accuse Judge Jacob Walker, III, of not doing his job. Hubbard asks the court for an acquittal, a new trial and other relief, citing Judge Walker allowing former Ethics Director, Jim Sumner, to testify as an expert witness, as grounds for the motion.

The motion states, “Hubbard requests a new trial under Rule 24.1(c)(2), because the State improperly presented putatively ‘expert’ testimony from witness Sumner about the meaning, purpose, and application of the laws under which Hubbard was charged.”
Read More

Hubbard: Defiant and Unrepentant

July 11, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Politcal Reporter

Michael G. Hubbard received a sentence of 96 years for his crimes.

However, because he was convicted under State ethics laws, Judge Jacob Walker, III, with advice from the State’s prosecution, gave him a split sentence of 4 years behind bars, with no “good time” or chance of parole, and 16 years probation.

There has been a cry of outrage over what is perceived as a light sentence for such a corrupt politician. But, this is actually a harsh sentence and a reasonable measure due to overcrowding in our State prison system. The State’s prosecution had recommended 5 years in prison and 12 years probation; very close to what Hubbard received.
Read More

Who Will Be Served: Justice or the Powerful Political Elites?

July 7, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

The sentencing hearing for Mike Hubbard will be held this Friday at 10:00 AM, in the court of Judge Jacob Walker, III. If Hubbard is treated differently than any other criminal, or if he is shown the slightest bit of deference because of his position, the peoples’ trust in law and State government will continue to be shattered.

When Hubbard was under investigation, a vast majority were convinced he would never be indicted because they believed a Republican controlled Attorney General’s Office would never indict one of their own. Once indicted, Hubbard, as well as the majority of politicos and citizens, thought he would never stand trial because the courts couldn’t be trusted to bring such a powerful politician to heel. Finally, most didn’t trust the jury system, thinking that they would be swayed by Hubbard’s political standing in the community, or that his allies just might buy-off a juror or two. Hubbard was indicted, he did stand trial, and a jury of his peers found him guilty of 12 felony public corruption charges.
Read More

© Copyright 2017 Alabama Political Reporter