Former U.S. Attorney Doug Jones wins Senate race; first Democratic win since 1992

December 12, 2017

By APR Staff
Alabama Political Reporter

Alabama elected its first Democratic senator in over two decades Tuesday after a grueling seven-month long election cycle.

Doug Jones, a former U.S. attorney, faced a great challenge in overcoming the deficit polling between him and his opponent, former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore. Jones trailed Moore for most of the campaign according to RealClearPolitics, which averages polls across various firms and media outlets.
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Waiting for the postmortem analysis of Tuesday’s Senate election

December 11, 2017

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

In the distant future, cooler heads will perhaps give a detailed examination of this U.S. Senate race to determine the postmortem of the news media, political parties and the body politic as a whole. Any reasonable person will look back and see this was a moment in time with no winners, only losers.

When The Washington Post story broke about Moore’s alleged sexual behavior on November 9, I asked APR’s staff to closely diagram the report because over the coming weeks I believed it would be difficult to determine facts from lies. And as one accuser became two and two became nine, and sexual allegations became pedophilia, the fevered pitch of reporting would leave even the most fair-minded reporter with some measure of confusion.

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The big question will be answered soon

November 22, 2017

By Steve Flowers
Inside the Statehouse

The big question in the Senate race is will allegations against Roy Moore and his purported propensities forty-years ago cause him to lose.  We will soon see.  The election is less than three weeks away.

The book on Moore is easy to read.  The polls have consistently revealed that 30 percent of voters like him and 70 percent do not like him.  He is a polarizing figure and well known.

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Trump deleted pro-Strange tweets during election night as Moore won

September 28, 2017

By Samuel Mattison
Alabama Political Reporter

President Donald Trump deleted three pro-Strange tweets from his Twitter account on the eve of the U.S. Senate Republican runoff.

Four tweets, cataloged by ProPublica, were deleted the night of the election after it was clear the Trump-backed Sen. Luther Strange, R-Ala., would lose.

Strange lost the election to former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore. It was clear early in the night that Moore won by a large margin.

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Too close to call

August 30, 2017

By Steve Flowers
INSIDE THE STATEHOUSE

Most people would assume that as the race for the open U.S. Senate began that Luther Strange, the appointed incumbent, was the favorite. However, polling indicated that Roy Moore was the favorite and still is as we head toward the September 26 runoff.

The initial polling showed that Moore had a hard-core 30 percent. It was and is as solid as a rock. He had 30 percent from the get-go. He had 30 percent midway in the race, and he had 30 percent at the end. It was also a fact that with a low voter turnout that his 30 percent would become accentuated because the final poll, and the one that counts, is Election Day and who actually shows up to vote. Moore’s supporters are more ardent, and they are going to show up to vote for him come hell or high water. They are also older, and older people tend to vote; 65-80 year old voters are always more likely to vote.

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Poll shows Moore ahead in US Senate race, negative view of McConnell’s spending

August 21, 2017

By Samuel Mattison
Alabama Political Reporter

A poll in the race for Alabama’s US Senate seat puts former State Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore ahead of sitting US Senator Luther Strange by 19 percentage points.

The telephone poll was conducted by JMC Analytics and Polling and was conducted last week. They polled 515 people and based the demographics of the poll from voter turnout during the Republican Primary on August 15. They gave the polling a margin error of 4.3 percent.

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It’s not complicated

August 2, 2017

By Steve Flowers
Inside the State House

There is a proven theory espoused by political scholars that has prevailed in southern political history for decades. The premier political scholar, Dr. V. O. Key, first illustrated this repetitious theme that has weaved its way through the southern electorate. He called it “Friends and Neighbors” politics. It is not a complicated hypothesis. It simply means that southerners tend to vote for someone from their neck of the woods. It is a truism in all southern states. However, it is most pronounced in the Heart of Dixie.
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