Attorney General Reacts to Hubbard Loyalist’s Plans for Ethics Reform

September 2, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

MONTGOMERY—Alabama House Ethics Committee Chairman, Mike Ball (R-Madison), announced his plans (yesterday) to form a commission to review the state’s ethics laws. Ball, a staunch defender of convicted felon and former House Speaker, Mike Hubbard, told WHNT-TV in Huntsville that his committee would “review the State’s Ethics laws and recommend improvements in time for the opening of the Alabama Legislature next year.”

However, just hours after APR published its story on Ball’s plan, Attorney General Luther Strange, sent his comments.  “I am strongly opposed to Rep. Mike Ball’s idea of a commission to review Alabama’s ethics law. The whole point of such a commission would be to undermine the law,” said Strange.  “Alabamians want our ethics laws enforced, not gutted.”
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Reform Bills Introduced Following Hubbard Scandal

August 20, 2016

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

For twenty months, the Alabama House of Representatives operated with a dark cloud of suspicion hanging over it. Then, Speaker of the House Mike Hubbard (R-Auburn) was indicted on 23 counts of felony ethics law violations. Speaker Hubbard maintained his innocence and allegedly used the power of his office to encourage members of State government to make statements defending him. Hubbard even used the fact that 104 of the 105 members voted for him as Speaker as proof that he was innocent, and that he was the victim of a “political witch hunt” by State prosecutors.
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Who Will Be Served: Justice or the Powerful Political Elites?

July 7, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

The sentencing hearing for Mike Hubbard will be held this Friday at 10:00 AM, in the court of Judge Jacob Walker, III. If Hubbard is treated differently than any other criminal, or if he is shown the slightest bit of deference because of his position, the peoples’ trust in law and State government will continue to be shattered.

When Hubbard was under investigation, a vast majority were convinced he would never be indicted because they believed a Republican controlled Attorney General’s Office would never indict one of their own. Once indicted, Hubbard, as well as the majority of politicos and citizens, thought he would never stand trial because the courts couldn’t be trusted to bring such a powerful politician to heel. Finally, most didn’t trust the jury system, thinking that they would be swayed by Hubbard’s political standing in the community, or that his allies just might buy-off a juror or two. Hubbard was indicted, he did stand trial, and a jury of his peers found him guilty of 12 felony public corruption charges.
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