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Rogers Thinks TSA Can Do Better

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

Congressman Mike Rogers (R) from Anniston is challenging the status quo at the TSA.  Rep. Rogers is the Chairman of the Homeland Security Subcommittee on Transportation Security.  In a written statement today, Chairman Rogers announced that he will form a panel of outside experts to make recommendations to help secure our nation’s transportation infrastructure and determine what TSA can do better.

Rep. Rogers said, “We know TSA has an image problem that is compounded by its multiple high profile mess ups.  The American people are rightly outraged at its intrusive bloated bureaucracy.  TSA must become a leaner and smarter organization – from downsizing employees to continuing implementation of risk-based security.”

The Alabama Congressman said, “I plan to use this hearing to get additional outside analysis and expertise about how to better protect aviation and surface systems, streamline the security process and reform TSA to become the intelligence-driven, professional entity its mission requires that will earn the trust of the traveling public.”

Chairman Rogers announced that there will be a Subcommittee hearing on July 10th at 12:30 p.m. in 311 Cannon HOB. The hearing is entitled “Challenging the Status Quo at TSA:  Perspectives on the Future of Transportation Security.”

Chairman Rogers said that the subcommittee will hear testimony from “Dr. Richard Bloom, Associate Vice President for Academics and Director for Terrorism, Espionage and Security Studies, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Mr. Robert Poole, Searle Freedom Trust Transportation Fellow and Director of Transportation Policy, Reason Foundation, Mr. Rick “Ozzie” Nelson, Senior Fellow and Director, Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies and Mr. Tom Blank, Executive Vice President, Gephardt Government Affairs, Gephardt Group.”

Prior to the 9-11 attacks the individual airlines were responsible for security screenings to get on the planes.  After 9-11, President George W. Bush created the TSA (Transportation Security Administration).  To federalize security at our nation’s airports.   The new administration has been criticized for its body scanners and aggressive patdowns of airline passengers.  Even though most terrorists are young men of Middle Eastern descent the TSA has refused to “profile” and has subjected 80 year old grandmothers to its security protocols.

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Supporters claim that the TSA has helped prevent another 9-11.  Critics counter that it has trampled on the rights of the airplane flying public.

Some, including Texas Congressman Ron Paul, favor abolishing the TSA. “The police state in this country is growing out of control. One of the ultimate embodiments of this is the TSA that gropes and grabs our children, our seniors and our loved ones and neighbors with disabilities.The TSA does all of this while doing nothing to keep us safe,” Rep. Paul said.

Rep. Rogers has been a member of the House Homeland Security Committee since 2005. Representative Rogers is also a senior member of the House Armed Services Committee.  Congressman Mike Rogers represents Alabama’s 3rd Congressional District.

Written By

Brandon Moseley is a senior reporter with over nine years at Alabama Political Reporter. During that time he has written 8,697 articles for APR. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Facebook. Brandon is a native of Moody, Alabama, a graduate of Auburn University, and a seventh generation Alabamian.

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