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Boeing to bring 400 new jobs to Huntsville

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

Tuesday, November 15, 2016, aviation giant, Boeing announced that it will add 400 jobs in Huntsville, Alabama, and will make an expected capital investment of $70 million in the state by 2020.

U.S. Senator Richard Shelby (R from Alabama) said in a statement, “Boeing’s expansion in Huntsville is great news for our state and a true testament to Alabama’s world class workforce. The company’s commitment to Alabama has not only made a lasting impact on our nation’s aerospace and defense capabilities, but also on our state’s economy. I look forward to the progress that will come from the additional jobs and investment in our state, and I am confident that Boeing will continue to build on its history of success in Alabama.”

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley (R) said, “Since Boeing first came to Alabama in 1962 joining our efforts to put man on the moon, our partnership has been a strong one and it continues to grow.”

Governor Bentley added, “A University of Alabama study found that Boeing’s presence in the state sustains nearly 8,400 direct and indirect jobs across Alabama. We look forward to a long relationship with Boeing and ensuring their continued growth and success.”

According to information supplied by the Bentley Administration, Boeing is taking steps to operate its Defense, Space & Security business more efficiently through facility consolidations and work movements that will increase employment at several locations including Huntsville. The jobs will be in the areas of engineering, advanced manufacturing and administrative support. This consolidation of work into Huntsville is part of Boeing’s ongoing efforts to make the best use of resources and talent as well as grow in the global aerospace market.

Boeing’s President and CEO for Defense, Space & Security Leanne Caret said, “In order to push ourselves farther and win more business, we need to make the most of our resources and talent. These steps will help us be a stronger partner for our customers worldwide. Making better use of our facilities will enhance efficiency and promote greater collaboration. This will help drive our global growth in Boeing’s second century.”

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The Alabama Commerce Department recently reported that Boeing has an impact on the Alabama economy totaling $2.3 billion a year.

The President of Boeing’s Network & Space Systems Jim Chilton said, “Boeing is stronger than ever as we launch into our second century. We continue our commitments to customers, our employees and the communities where we live and work. We are proud to be partners in the state of Alabama.”

According to the University of Alabama reportThe analysis, released last week, outlined Boeing already supports 8,393 direct and industry jobs in the state with a payroll of $264 million in 2015 in Alabama.

Congressman Mo Brooks (R from Huntsville) said, “The study shows that Boeing’s innovative technology solutions are in high demand and that Alabamians are driving innovation at the forefront of aerospace and defense industries.”

Sources close to President Donald Trump has suggested that increased defense spending could be part of his plan to: “Make America Great Again.” If so defense contractors like Boeing could be big beneficiaries.

Written By

Brandon Moseley is a senior reporter with over nine years at Alabama Political Reporter. During that time he has written 8,794 articles for APR. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Facebook. Brandon is a native of Moody, Alabama, a graduate of Auburn University, and a seventh generation Alabamian.

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