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AG Steve Marshall endorses Billy Murray for Sheriff of St. Clair County

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

Tuesday, July 18, 2017, Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall (R) was in Moody, Alabama to endorse St. Clair County Assistant Sheriff Billy Murray (R) for Sheriff in 2018.

Marshall said that violent crime has not been going down in the last ten years like he would like for it to and the State is presently in an opioid dependency crisis.  Marshall said that he was working hard but that fighting crime is a team effort.  Marshal called Murray a “Nehemiah leader,” one of those leaders who do not accept the world as it is; but instead works to make the world a better place.

AG Marshall (who is facing his own 2018 election) said that he looked forward to working with Murray whether that was for the next 18 months or the next nine years.  Marshall urged the overflow crowd at the Tuesday evening event to get out and tell their friends, family, and neighbors to support Murray and to support Murray’s campaign financially.  Asking people for money is one of the hardest things that a candidate does; but it is necessary.

Murray’s candidacy was also endorsed by St. Clair County Sheriff Terry Surles (R), who is retiring at the end of this term.  Surles said that he has known Murray since he was eight years old and that there is no one better man and no one better prepared to be the next Sheriff of St. Clair County.  “When I ask Billy to do something it gets done.”

Murray, age 47, said that he had 25 years of experience and that this is the job he has wanted since he was eight years old.

Murray is a graduate of Springville High School.  He is a 1992 graduate of the University of Alabama Law Enforcement Academy.  Murray also graduated from the Jefferson County SWAT School; the Crime Scene Investigator School; the FBI Hostage Negotiation School; the Birmingham SWAY School; and the FBI National Academy.  Murray is very active in his community and is a member of a number of groups including the Rotary Club, the St. Clair County Republican Party, and the Republican State Executive Committee.

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Murray said that when he was at Quantico at the FBI academy that he wore a St. Clair County pin on his lapel.

Former Alabama Power Chief Executive Officer Elmer Harris praised Murray for his experience and qualifications and urged him and the crowd present to work hard over the next eleven months to get Murray elected.

Murray said, “Thank you from the bottom of my heart for all the wonderful people who helped make this night possible and over 600 supporters who came out to share this night with us.”

Over 650 people attended the event, hosted by Red Diamond President and CEO Bill Bowron at their Moody corporate headquarters.  State Representative Jim Hill (R from Odenville) emceed the event.

Murray is married to Christy Hipps Murray of Ragland. They have one daughter.

Steve Marshall was appointed Attorney General by former Governor Robert Bentley (R) when Bentley appointed Luther Strange to the United States Senate.  Marshall was District Attorney in Marshal Country for nine years.

The Republican Primary will be on June 5, 2018.

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Brandon Moseley
Written By

Brandon Moseley is a senior reporter with over nine years at Alabama Political Reporter. During that time he has written 8,297 articles for APR. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Facebook. Brandon is a native of Moody, Alabama, a graduate of Auburn University, and a seventh generation Alabamian.

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