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In interview Gov. Ivey says, “I’m wonderfully well”

Bill Britt

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Gov. Kay Ivey sits down for an interview with APR Editor Bill Britt and Associate Editor Susan Britt. (Chandler Walker/APR)

Earlier this week in an interview with the Alabama Political Reporter, Gov. Kay Ivey spoke on a range of topics including her first year in office, why she stands by controversial economic development bill HB317, and why calls for debates leading into the Republican primary is a stunt to draw attention away from the critical issues facing the state. She also shared her thoughts on ethics reform, offering a clear code of conduct and a surprising fix to selecting ethics commissioners in the future.

In a 40 minute conversation that, at times, moved from close tension to smiles, blushes and laughter, the 54th governor of Alabama laid out to APR why she serves, her complete trust in her cabinet and why she is running for four more years. Far from the gentle, grandmotherly image in her softly lit campaign commercial, Gov. Ivey is a tough, savvy politician who speaks her mind.

After taking the oath of office on April 10, 2017, Gov. Ivey promised to steady the ship of state and restore Alabama’s image. The governor says she feels her administration has come a long way toward fulfilling those promises.

“We certainly steadied the ship, and that had to occur,” said Ivey. “We had been under a dark cloud. The state had very little, if any, direction and people were disillusioned.”

She recalled that her first meeting after her swearing-in was with Secretary of Commerce Greg Canfield. “It was important to me to meet with him as the first meeting because I knew then as I know now – number one: how important economic development is to people. If you can find ways to put people back to work, where they can earn a living, and that goes a long way to solving problems.”

Ivey profusely defended Canfield, who recently has been under attack by the media—especially APR— and politicos for his dogged—some say shady—support of HB317, a bill that carved out a special exception for economic development professionals who are exempt from state ethics laws.

Ivey said she had no difficulty following the ethics laws as written. “I try my best to read the law and abide by it, and I check with an attorney if I’m unclear.”

Gov. Ivey says the legislation was necessary to make Alabama competitive as it seeks to lure businesses to the state. “Well, first of all, economic development is important. Rural areas, urban areas, economic development is a necessary ongoing effort that we’ve got to be competitive – and it’s a very competitive process,” said Ivey. She said that Alabama is only one out of three states that doesn’t clarify that economic development professionals are not lobbyists. Sticking with the talking points that led to its passage, Ivey defended the bill as vital to growing the state’s economy. “More importantly is we don’t want to lose any projects that we would have lost if this had not passed,” Ivey concluded.

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As for rewriting the ethics code as proposed by Republican House and Senate leadership for the 2019 regular session, Ivey wouldn’t commit but didn’t rule out calling a special session to focus attention on that one issue. She conceded that such a Herculean process would require serious preparation and intense attention to details. Lately, House and Senate leadership has cited the stringent ethics laws as to why lawmakers are leaving office and why they are having trouble finding candidates. Recently, Republican Senate President Pro Tem Del Marsh, from Anniston, said that under current ethics laws only wealthy individuals or retirees would run for office.

Ivey said she had no difficulty following the ethics laws as written. “I try my best to read the law and abide by it, and I check with an attorney if I’m unclear,” said Ivey. When asked why everyone in public service couldn’t follow her example, she replied, “I’m sure they could.”

The governor said she had been thinking about how ethics commissioners are appointed and finds that there is potential for a conflicting interest since commissioners are chosen by the speaker of the house, lieutenant governor and governor.

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“I find it sort of curious and troubling a little bit that the governor, lieutenant governor, and the speaker of the house are the three people that currently make appointments to the commission,” Ivey said. “We three serve under the provisions the commission is charged with enforcing, so it seems troubling to me that – I’m going to appoint you to the Ethics Commission, and then somebody brings charges on me and you’re going to sit in judgment of me.” She says it makes more sense to change the appointment process so the commission appointments are made by the chief justice of the Supreme Court, presiding judge of the Court of Criminal Appeals and presiding judge of the Court of Civil Appeals. “They answer to the Court of Judicial Inquiry under Alabama state law. And they’d be independent,” she said.

Recently, Ivey has come under attack by certain media outlets and Huntsville Mayor Tommy Battle, who claims she is avoiding a head-to-head debate match-up with her Republican primary challengers. “This race is not going to be about stunts to attract media attention. This race is going to be about the individuals’ records, and mine’s an open book,” Ivey said. “Under my leadership, we got jobs, unemployment’s low. We put our people back to work, and Alabamians know that.” Ivey seemed to enjoy taunting the media and her rivals but recounting her success over the last year. Current polls show Ivey’s approval rating steady at over 60 percent favorable. “But anyway, my schedule is just not such that I can let the media or campaigns dictate my schedule. I’ve got to govern, and I plan to govern,” she said.

“This race is not going to be about stunts to attract media attention. This race is going to be about the individuals’ records, and mine’s an open book.”

During the interview, Ivey defended the state’s decision to hire Wexford Health Sources, Inc., to provide healthcare services for its beleaguered prison system despite the company’s potential financial collapse under the weight of the impending lawsuit in Mississippi. Citing her confidence in the department of correction’s commissioner, Jeff Dunn, Ivey felt Wexford was the right choice after a point by point comparison of the three companies vying for the hundred million dollar contract. Despite Wexford being sued by the state of Mississippi for its part in a bribery scandal relayed to its DOC commissioner, who now resides in prison, she was comfortable with Dunn’s choice. Ivey said she seemed to recall reports that Wexford was not involved in the scandal. APR could not readily identify a report that exonerated Wexford.

Confidence in her cabinet is high according to Gov. Ivey, who said of its members, “They are strong people, with expert knowledge in their subject matter, and also, highly intelligent and deeply committed to providing an open, honest and transparent state.”

Ivey says her commitment to serving goes back to her youth when she was elected lt. governor at Girls’ State, a summer leadership and citizenship program sponsored by The American Legion and the American Legion Auxiliary for high school juniors. “I’ve long had a passion for helping others, whether it was being lieutenant governor at Girls’ State or vice president of the student body at Auburn University. I’ve always had a passion for helping people do more than they thought they could.”

When asking about her health and grueling schedule, she replied, “I’m wonderfully well. After visiting with y’all, I’m fixing to leave and head to Escambia County for the night. I’m doing fine.”

She will face a roster of men in the Republican primary in June.

 

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Aerospace and Defense

Jones criticized for voting to limit Trump’s war powers authority

Brandon Moseley

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Thursday, U.S. Senator Doug Jones (D-Alabama) voted in favor of S.J.Res.68, a resolution which directs the removal of United States military from hostilities against the Islamic Republic of Iran that have not been authorized by Congress. Jones has been criticized by Republicans for voting to limit President Donald J. Trump’s war powers on Iran.

“Before a President can lead us into war, he or she must first earn the support of the American people and also fulfill their solemn constitutional obligation to seek approval from Congress,” Sen. Jones said in a statement. “While the President has the power to protect Americans in the case of an imminent attack, that authority does not extend to committing our service members to long-term hostilities unilaterally. This resolution sends a strong message that we will follow the Constitution and we will not send our troops into harm’s way without the serious consideration and consent of the Congress.”

Trump Victory National Finance Committee member Perry O. Hooper Jr. released a statement in response.

“Senator Jones once again turned his back on Alabama and voted as the leftwing Democrats commanded. He has no regard for the values, opinions or views of Alabamians,” Hooper said. “He sees us as deplorables just like the elites of the Democratic party who have funded 80 percent of his doomed campaign for re-election.:

Hooper stated, “I whole heartily support the President who stated ‘We are doing very well with Iran and this is not the time to show weakness… If my hands were tied, Iran would have a field day. Sends a very bad signal. The Democrats are only doing this as an attempt to embarrass the Republican Party.’”

“The Commander-in-chief must be free to work with his staff and his military leaders to conduct covert operations like the one that eliminated Iran’s terrorist-in-chief General Soleimani,” Hooper added. “You can’t micromanage the war on terrorism. The Democrats in Congress are so filled with Trump Derangement Syndrome that no matter how much it would benefit our country and the world; they would never give Trump a “victory”. If it came down to it, they would leak everything to the media no matter what the consequences.”

Senator Jones is a cosponsor of the legislation and a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee. Eight moderate Republicans voted with the Democrats on the resolution.

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Senator Jones has also been criticized by Republicans for his comments that he was “appalled” by Pres. Trump’s actions following his acquittal on both Articles of Impeachment.

“Newsflash for Senator Doug Jones: Most Alabamians have been appalled by his actions his entire time in office,” former Attorney General Jeff Sessions said. “It’s about time we send Doug home, and replace him with someone who understands our values. Alabamians deserve a Senator they can be proud of again.”

Sessions is a candidate for the Republican nomination for Jones’ Senate seat.

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The Republican primary will be on March 3.

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News

Moore says the Constitution is under God’s laws

Brandon Moseley

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Saturday, Senate candidate former Chief Justice Roy Moore (R) presented his views on the Constitution and the sovereignty of God to attendees of the Conservative Leadership Conference in Florence.

“The form of government is both the Declaration and the Constitution,” Judge Moore said.

Moore argued that the rights granted to the citizens in the Bill of Rights do not come from the Constitution itself; but rather from God and the Constitution is there to protect those rights that God has ordained.

“The Constitution is the supreme law of the land; but the Constitution is under the rule of God,” Moore stated. “We as Americans, as Republicans as Democrats should go back to the Constitution.”

“Democrats are trying to move us toward a socialist government,” Moore warned. “The same people who want to take our guns away want to take prayer out of schools.”

“Most Christians do not understand the Ten Commandments,” Moore said. The first four are the duties that we owe to God and the last six are the duties that we owe to each other.

Moore quoted from Washington, Blackstone, and the 1954 legislation that inserted “under God” into the Pledge of Allegiance.

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Moore said that Project Birmingham used Russian style tactics to undermine the support for Roy Moore and build up support for Doug Jones. Moore also blamed Richard Shelby for his defeat.

Moore said that Democrats have used similar smears liked the ones used against him in 2017 against Brett Kavanaugh and Clarence Thomas.

“When you vote is stolen from you by tactics that is wrong,” Moore said/

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Moore warned that the greatest threat to this nation is the decline in morality. “We are at a critical point in our history.”

Moore warned that no nation could take us down from without; but that we could fall from within and warned of the growing agenda of the LGBTQ community.

“We are starting to recognize transgender rights above the right of your rights,” Moore warned.

“We are five votes (in the Senate) away from overturning everything our country is founded upon,” Moore warned if the Equality Act is passed. The Equality Act, “Which sounds good is about to take away the most precious thing our country is founded upon: our freedom of conscious.”

Moore warned that the legislation would lead to men in girls’ bathrooms and in girls’ sports.

Moore said that when man invents rights that are not from God it leads to problems. The right to privacy was invented and from that came the right to abortion, which has resulted in the deaths of millions, the right to sodomy, and the right to gay marriage. Now we are about to create a right of transgenderism.

Moore said that marriage was ordained by God as between one man and one woman. “If you can make it between two men you could make it between five men and between a man and a horse.”

“How do you correct it?” Moore asked rhetorically. “You recognize the sovereignty of God.”

“I have been mocked and removed from office twice,” Moore said.

“I am sick of seeing politicians carrying Bibles and doing nothing,” Moore said. The national debt was $5 trillion in 2005 now it is $23 trillion. They say they are Pro-Life and yet Planned Parenthood continues to get taxpayer dollars.

“We keep quiet because we are afraid it is going to offend anybody,” Moore said. “I couldn’t keep quiet about Obergefell. I wrote an opinion in API.”

Moore is a candidate for the GOP nomination for U.S. Senate in the Republican primary on March 3.

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House

McCutcheon is in “wait and see mode” on medical marijuana bill

Brandon Moseley

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Speaker of the Alabama House of Representatives Mac McCutcheon (R-Monrovia) last Thursday was asked by reporters where he stood on pending medical marijuana legislation.

“I am in a wait and see mode,” McCutcheon told reporters. “The sponsor of the bill has done a lot of work.”

On Tuesday, State Senator Tim Melson (R-Florence) introduced a bill to legalize tightly controlled medical cannabis. The Medical cannabis bill introduced on Tuesday is Senate Bill 165.

“We have a letter from the Attorney General,” recommending that the legislature reject the bill.

Attorney General Steve Marshall (R) is arguing that while marijuana remains a federally controlled substance the legislature should not pass a state law that would be noncompliant with federal law. Marshall believes that if medical marijuana has any medical benefit then the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will be the appropriate authority to approve such legislation and the state should wait for FDA to act.

33 states already have legalized medical marijuana.

“It brings up a legal question when you get a legal opinion from the attorney general office,” McCutcheon explained. “It answers some of my questions and also on the pro and the con there were some questions raised in the legal community.”

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McCutcheon said, “That is why we are in the mode that we are in.”

Melson introduced a medical marijuana bill last year during the 2019 regular session. That bill passed the Senate; but had difficulty getting out of committee in the Alabama House of Representatives. Instead of passing medical marijuana legislation the legislature passed a bill extending Leni’s Law and Carly’s law and establishing the Alabama Medical Cannabis Study Commission tasked with making a recommendation to the legislature.

The Alabama Medical Cannabis Study Commission was chaired by Sen. Melson and met monthly from August to November. In December, the commission voted in favor of a draft proposal recommending that the state allow licensed medical providers to prescribe marijuana based medications to patients with a demonstrated need. The state would create the Alabama Medical Cannabis Commission to regulate medical cannabis in the state. Farmers, processors, transporters, and dispensaries would have to get a license from the Commission and product would be strictly regulated.

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Despite the Commission’s recommendation, SB165 remains highly controversial in the legislature and there is expected to be considerable opposition to the bill. SB165 is 82 pages long.

SB165 has been assigned to the Senate Judiciary Committee. Judiciary Committee Chairman Cam Ward (R-Alabaster) told the Alabama Political Reporter that there will be a public hearing on SB165 on Wednesday, at 8:30 a.m. in the Alabama Statehouse room 825. Opponents and proponents will both be given the opportunity to voice their opinions.

Thursday was the fourth day of the 2020 legislative session.

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Elections

Congressional candidates call on Sessions, Byrne to stand up for South Alabama

Staff

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At a rare joint press conference, the Democratic Candidates for the First Congressional District called on Rep. Bradley Byrne and former Sen. Jeff Sessions to stand up for South Alabama following the Trump Administration’s proposal to cut nearly $300 million slated for projects awarded to Austal.

“The current administration’s decision to divert that funding from Austal to build the border wall is harmful to our community and will potentially put good jobs at risk,” said Dr. James Averhart, CW05, USMC retired. “This is nothing more than a political stunt on the backs of the hard-working men and women of South Alabama.”

Over the years, South Alabama has become a hub for shipbuilding and defense projects developing ships and planes for the United States military.

“While the President may be comfortable playing political games with our communities, our representatives must stand strong against this disastrous decision,” said Dr. Kiani Gardner, a scientist and professor. “We are grateful Senator Jones is speaking out against it and the devastating impacts it could have on our communities.”

This matter transcends partisan politics, our Republican representatives must stand with Senator Jones and tell President Trump to find a better way to protect our Southern border,” said Rick Collins, a longtime Mobile businessman.

This is only the latest Trump Administration proposals that could have devastating impacts for the local economy. Recently, the administration proposed new tariffs that would have a significant impact on Airbus’ local operation.

 

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