Connect with us

Elections

Small business group endorses Kay Ivey for governor

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

Tuesday, September 18, 2018 the NFIB Alabama Political Action Committee has endorsed Kay Ivey for governor. The National Federation of Independent Businesses is the nation’s leading small-business association. NFIB State Director Rosemary Elebash announced the endorsement Monday at a news conference at Southern Distributor/Auto Electric and Carburetor Co., an NFIB member business in Birmingham.

The NFIB Alabama PAC’s endorsement is based on the candidate’s record and position on small-business issues.

“Kay Ivey is the clear choice for Alabama’s small businesses,” Elebash said. “Kay Ivey is a strong leader who understands the challenges facing Alabama’s job creators. She opposes higher taxes and burdensome rules and regulations that would make it harder for small businesses to succeed and create jobs. This spring, she signed legislation prohibiting cities from requiring companies to purchase a municipal business license before driving through their jurisdictions for work purposes.”

“As Governor, I have made it my job to create a strong environment for job creation,” Gov. Ivey said. “That’s why I’ve worked closely with the NFIB and the state Legislature, signing the largest tax cut in a decade and eliminating unnecessary regulations that make it more difficult and more expensive to do business. Being endorsed for Governor by Alabama’s small businesses is truly an honor. I am grateful for their trust, support and everything they do to keep Alabama working!”

“Since taking office a little over a year ago, Governor Ivey has announced more than 15,500 new jobs and more than $8 billion in capital investment, creating exciting new opportunities for all kinds of small businesses,” Elebash added. “Under her leadership, our pro-business climate has received national recognition from the likes of the influential Business Facilities magazine, and Alabama’s employment rate is the highest it’s ever been.”

The President of Southern Distributors Steve Kampwerth said, “I would lie to welcome our guests including our esteemed guest, Governor Kay Ivey.”

Kampwerth personally thanked Gov. Ivey for her support for Senate Bill 316 during the last legislative session. “This bill established a 10,000 maximum before they had to apply for a local delivery license. As an auto parts distributer, we had to apply for hundreds of these licenses annually. Thank you governor for supporting this bill.”

Public Service Announcement

Director Elebash said that each election, “We send a ballot to each of our members statewide. For the very first time since I have been here, Governor Ivey received the endorsement of 98 percent of our members. That is a record.”

Gov. Ivey was elevated to the office in April of 2017 Elebash said. “The NFIB has passed more than 80 small business bills in that period of time.”

“It is my honor to be here and spend time to people like you that our devoted to keeping Alabama working,” Gov. Ivey said. “Job creators are important to keep Alabama working.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“It is not enough for our business to survive but to thrive,” Ivey said.
Elebash promised that, We will be working each day to make sure that our member are out working to help turn out the powerful small-business voting bloc on Election Day.

Reporters asked Ivey about her school sentry program that allows schools to arm one administrator.

“It is up to each school system to make their own decision,” Ivey said on whether or not they participate in the program.

Ivey said that she was not surprised by the recent court decision against the Alabama prison system and said that the prison system was working on filling its staffing shortage.

“We are working best and fast as we can,” she said. “Just because you have to hire more folks, it doesn’t mean they are available.” The prisons, “Are an Alabama problem, it will be solved by Alabamians.”

On Friday, U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson, a Jimmy Carter appointee, ordered the state to show why it should not be held in contempt of court for failing to meet his deadline for increasing the number of staff devoted to mental health in the prisons. The Southern Poverty Law Center is suing the state and the Alabama Department of Corrections on behalf of the convicts claiming that the lack of mental health staff amounts to cruel and unusual punishment under the Eighth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

The Alabama Political Reporter asked Director Elebash why they were not supporting Tuscaloosa Mayor Walter “Walt” Maddox (D) who has promised a lottery as a solution for some of the state’s revenue problems.

“We consider that as more of a social issue,” Elebash said. “None of my members have said that to me. My members have real world problems. They call me and say I have a problem,” with a regulation or something, such as like the issue here about the local delivery licenses. “Governor Ivey has been real good at working with us.”

“Gov. Ivey is all about action, not words,” Elebash said.

The NFIB said in a statement that “Today’s endorsement puts the considerable grassroots support of the state’s small businesses behind the governor’s campaign. Small-business owners and their employees vote in high numbers and are known for recruiting friends, family members and acquaintances to vote. NFIB will encourage its Alabama members to help turn out the powerful small-business voting bloc on Election Day.”

For more than 75 years, NFIB has been the voice of small business, advocating on behalf of America’s small and independent business owners, both in Washington, D.C., and in all 50 state capitals. The NFIB is nonprofit, nonpartisan, and member-driven. Since its founding in 1943, NFIB has been exclusively dedicated to small and independent businesses and remains so today.

Brandon Moseley is a senior reporter with eight and a half years at Alabama Political Reporter. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Facebook. Brandon is a native of Moody, Alabama, a graduate of Auburn University, and a seventh generation Alabamian.

Advertisement

Elections

Alabama Forestry Association endorses Tuberville

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

Republican U.S. Senate candidate Tommy Tuberville.

The Alabama Forestry Association announced Wednesday that the group is endorsing Republican Senate nominee Tommy Tuberville in the upcoming general election.

“We are proud to endorse Tommy Tuberville in the United States Senate race,” said AFA Executive Vice President Chris Isaacson. “He is a conservative with an impressive list of accomplishments, and we know that he will continue that record in his role as U.S. Senator. Tommy knows that decisions made in Washington impact families and businesses and will be an effective voice for the people of Alabama.”

“I am honored to have the endorsement of the Alabama Forestry Association,” Tuberville said. “The AFA is an excellent organization that stands for pro-business policies. Protecting Alabama industry is a key to our state’s success.”

Tuberville recently won the Republican nomination after a primary season that was extended because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Tuberville is a native of Arkansas and a graduate of Southern Arkansas University. He held a number of assistant coaching positions, including defensive coordinator at Texas A&M and the University of Miami where he won a national championship.

Tuberville has been a head coach at Mississippi, Auburn, Texas Tech and Cincinnati. In his nine years at Auburn University, the team appeared in eight consecutive bowl games. His 2004 team won the SEC Championship and the Sugar Bowl.

Tuberville coached that team to a perfect 13 to 0 season.

Public Service Announcement

Tuberville has been married to his wife Suzanne since 1991. They have two sons and live in Auburn.

Tuberville is challenging incumbent Democratic Sen. Doug Jones in the Nov. 3 general election.

Continue Reading

Elections

Jones campaign says Tuberville is not taking the pandemic seriously

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

Incumbent Sen. Doug Jones, left, and Republican challenger Tommy Tubberville, right.

Incumbent Democratic Sen. Doug Jones’ re-election campaign released a statement critical of Republican Senate nominee Tommy Tuberville, suggesting that he is not taking the COVID-19 pandemic seriously enough.

“The Washington Post reported today that the stock market plummeted after jobless claims climbed last week by 1.4 million and the economy shrank by 9.5 percent — the biggest decline in most of our lifetimes,” the Jones campaign wrote. “While economists are worried about the permanent damage COVID-19 will do to the economy, and public health experts are pleading for people to abide by state and local mask orders, Tommy Tuberville ‘snickers’ in response to questions about flouting public health orders while in DC to raise campaign cash. The people of Alabama need to know that Tuberville is not taking the pandemic seriously, raising serious questions about how he would handle this crisis if elected.”

The Washington Post reported that “Tuberville is fundraising and holding ­in-person meetings in Washington this week, defying orders from D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) that visitors from Alabama and other coronavirus hot spots quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.”

“Tuberville spent at least some of his time at the Trump International Hotel, according to a photo posted to Facebook by Rep. Bruce Westerman (R-Ark.) showing the two men in the hotel lobby on Tuesday night,” the media reports stated. “Neither man was masked.”

Tuberville told AL.com that he has been called “everything in the world” so the last week is nothing new.

The Washington Post reported Wednesday the former Auburn coach broke Washington D.C. policy requiring “non-essential” visitors from states with high coronavirus case counts to self-quarantine for 14 days when he attended fundraising meetings in the city this week. In addition, a photo of Tuberville with Rep. Bruce Westerman, R-Arkansas, at the Trump International Hotel in Washington showed neither man wearing a face covering.

Tuberville addressed the controversy in comments to the Alabama Republican Executive Committee on Saturday. Tuberville said that he followed all the rules and wore his mask everywhere he went. When he was at events he would take his mask off to dine and people would come over to his table to shake his hand and get their picture taken. The press has seized on those moments to attack him, he claimed.

Public Service Announcement

The COVID-19 global pandemic has killed 707,158 people worldwide including 160,833 Americans since it first was discovered in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China in late 2019. Absent an effective treatment or a vaccine, social distancing and masks are the only tools that we have to slow the spread of the virus.

The Tuberville-Jones race for U.S. Senate is going to have an important role in whether or not Republicans are able to hold on to their narrow Senate majority.

Tuberville is an Arkansas native. He is best known for his tenure as Auburn University’s head football coach, which includes an undefeated and untied team that won the SEC Championship and the Sugar Bowl. He also coached at Texas Tech, Cincinnati and Mississippi.

ADVERTISEMENT

The general election is Nov. 3. Tuberville has been endorsed by President Donald Trump.

Continue Reading

Elections

Jones campaign director blasts Tuberville for saying $600 “too much” for out-of-work Alabamians

Eddie Burkhalter

Published

on

Incumbent Sen. Doug Jones, left, and Republican challenger Tommy Tubberville, right.

The communications director for U.S. Sen. Doug Jones’s re-election campaign on Wednesday called out Tommy Tuberville for saying that $600 in emergency unemployment aid was too much for Alabamians. 

“Tommy Tuberville once again proves he’s out of touch with Alabama. When he ‘resigned’ from his job as a football coach he took a $5.1 million payout for himself. To this day, he receives $800 a week in State Retirement funds for a coaching job he ‘quit’ in 2008,” said Owen Kilmer, communications Director for Jones’s Senate campaign, in a statement Wednesday. 

“But he says $600 in emergency benefits is ‘way too much’ for people in Alabama who lost their jobs in this crisis through no fault of their own. Tuberville says $600 is ‘way too much’ to help people put food on the table and pay utilities,” Kilmer continued. “No wonder, when asked about how to handle this crisis, he said ‘I wouldn’t have a clue.’ It’s true. He doesn’t.”

Tuberville, the Republican Senate nominee, is trying to unseat Jones in the November general election. Jones has called the former Auburn football coach and first-time political candidate an unprepared hyper-partisan.

Continue Reading

Elections

Mimi Penhale, Russell Bedsole advance to GOP runoff in HD49

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

Miriam "Mimi" Penhale, left, and Russell Bedsole, right, are vying for the vacant Alabama House District 49 seat.

Republican voters in House District 49 went to the polls Tuesday to nominate their next representative. Miriam “Mimi” Penhale and Russell Bedsole received the most votes and will advance on to the special Republican primary runoff scheduled for Sept. 1.

“What an incredible day!” Bedsole said. “Thank you friends and family for your love, support, and prayers. We had a great showing today and we are on to a runoff. Looking forward to getting back out and winning this thing on September 1st.”

“THANK YOU Bibb, Chilton and Shelby County!” Penhale said on social media. “I’m looking forward to earning your vote, again, on September 1 in the runoff.”

The election was very tight between the two. Mimi Penhale received 829 votes, or 31.4 percent of the votes. Russell Bedsole received 919 votes, or 34.8 percent.

The rest of the votes was split among the other four candidates. James Dean received less than 1 percent, Chuck Martin received 24.3 percent, Jackson McNeely received 2.16 percent and Donna Strong received 6.71 percent.

There were 2,639 votes cast on Tuesday. Voter turnout was 8.88 percent.

Bedsole serves on the Alabaster City Council, Pemhale is the director of the Shelby County Legislative office.

Public Service Announcement

The eventual winner of the Republican nomination will face Democrat Cheryl Patton in the special general election on Tuesday, Nov. 17.

The vacancy in House District 49 was created when State Rep. April Weaver, R-Briarfield, announced her resignation to accept an appointment as a regional director of the Department of Health and Human Services.

House District 49 consists of portions of Bibb, Shelby and Chilton Counties. The winner will serve the remainder of Weaver’s term, which ends in late 2022.

ADVERTISEMENT

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement