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Ivey announces $17.8 million in Community Development Block Grants

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Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey awarded almost $17.8 million in Community Development Block Grants for improvements to 54 Alabama towns, cities and counties.

“The beginning of a better Alabama starts today for many residents who are without clean water to drink or safe roads to drive or suitable housing in which to live,” Governor Ivey said. “I am pleased to award these grants to support vital community improvement projects, and I commend the dedicated local officials who sought these grants with the intent to make their communities better places to live.”

The 55 grants will support a number of community improvement projects including water and sewer extensions and rehabilitation, street and drainage improvements, housing rehabilitation and community centers.

Community Development Block Grants are awarded annually through a competitive process in four main categories including small city, large city, counties and community enhancements. Other categories in this round include Black Belt and planning grants. Award determinations are based on the number of low and moderate-income families affected, urgency of the need and project cost efficiency.

The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) is administering the grants from funds made available by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

“As a former mayor whose city has been a recipient of CDBG awards, I can attest to how important this program is to our towns, cities and counties and the difference these grants can make in a community,”

ADECA Director Kenneth Boswell said. “ADECA is pleased to join Governor Ivey in the partnerships that it takes to make these grants come to fruition.”

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The Small City Fund is exclusively for municipalities with populations of 3,000 or less. From the Small City Fund: Beatrice was awarded $350,000 for street improvements. Camden received $350,000 for water and sewer improvements. Carrollton received $350,000 for sewer improvements. Cherokee received $314,000 for street and drainage improvements. Detroit was awarded $350,000 for water improvements. Falkville received $350,000 for sewer improvements. Luverne was awarded $350,000 for water and street improvements. Millry received $350,000 for water improvements. New Hope received $350,000 for sewer and street improvements. Oak Grove got $200,000 for sewer improvements. Parrish received $350,000 for street and drainage improvements. Pisgah was awarded $314,900 for water improvements. Rutledge $350,000 for street improvements. Samson $350,000 for sewer, water and street improvements. Sumiton $350,000 for sewer improvements. Toxey received $350,000 for street improvements. Woodville received $350,000 for street and drainage improvements. Vredenburgh was awarded $350,000 for street improvements.

The Large City Fund is for Municipalities with populations of 3,001 or more. From the Large City Fund, Andalusia was awarded $280,000 for street improvements. Demopolis got $450,000 for sewer improvements. Elba received $450,000 for downtown revitalization. Eufaula received $450,000 for housing rehabilitation. Haleyville was granted $450,000 for sewer, water, drainage and street improvements. Hamilton received $450,000 for sewer, water, street and drainage improvements. Jacksonville received $429,713 for sewer improvements. LaFayette was awarded $450,000 for water improvements. Piedmont got $450,000 for sewer improvements. Roanoke received $359,487 for street improvements. Talladega received $450,000 for sewer improvements. Tuskegee got $450,000 for water and street improvements, and demolition and revitalization.

The County Fund applies to 65 Alabama counties with Mobile and Jefferson counties receiving CDBG funds directly from HUD. From the County Fund, Baldwin County got $350,000 for water improvements near the Lillian community. Hale County received $350,000 for water improvements in the Akron area. Madison County received an award of $300,000 for water improvements east of Huntsville. Marshall County was given $350,000 for street improvements on several county roads. Monroe County received $350,000 for water improvements west of Frisco City. Montgomery County got $350,000 for housing rehabilitation in Eastwood Villa. Sumter County received $350,000 for water improvements north of Cuba. Washington County received an award of $350,000 for water improvement in the Fruitdale area.

The Community Enhancement Fund us for municipalities of all sizes and 65 Alabama counties for projects addressing quality of life issues. Akron was given $250,000 for sewer improvements. Autaugaville received $250,000 for a new senior center. Barbour County got $250,000 for a new fire station in the Texasville community. Billingsley was given $250,000 for town park improvements. Blountsville was granted $250,000 for sewer and street improvements. Blue Springs received $185,000 for water improvements. Butler County was awarded $250,000 for courthouse renovations/handicapped accessibility. Cottonwood got $250,000 for street improvements. Dozier received $247,510 for demolition and clearance. Enterprise received $250,000 for demolition and clearance. Lauderdale County was awarded $202,569 for a new senior center in the Greenhill community. Lisman was given $182,771 for street improvements. Midway got $250,000 to convert a school into a community center. River Falls was given $250,000 for street improvements.

The Black Belt Fund is exclusively for municipalities and counties within a 12-county Black Belt region. Selma received $450,000 for drainage improvements from the Black Belt Fund.

The Planning Fund is awarded to guide municipalities in orderly growth, revitalization or development. Piedmont received $40,000 and Skyline was granted $35,000.

Kay Ivey served two term as Treasure and then was elected to two terms as Lieutenant Governor. She was elevated to governor in April 2017. Ivey is seeking her own term as governor in the November 6 general election. She faces a challenge from Tuscaloosa Mayor Walter “Walt” Maddox (D).

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Brandon Moseley
Written By

Brandon Moseley is a senior reporter with over nine years at Alabama Political Reporter. During that time he has written 8,297 articles for APR. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Facebook. Brandon is a native of Moody, Alabama, a graduate of Auburn University, and a seventh generation Alabamian.

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