Connect with us

National

Sewell celebrates Black History Month

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

Friday U.S. Rep. Terri A. Sewell, D-Alabama, commented on the annual February celebration of Black History Month.

“During Black History Month, we celebrate the extraordinary contributions and accomplishments African Americans have made to this nation and the world,” Sewell said. “As the first black Congresswoman elected from Alabama, a proud native of Selma and representative of Alabama’s Civil Rights district, I know I stand on the shoulders of so many giants who courageously fought, bled and died to make our society more just, equal and inclusive for all.”

“The legacy of Alabama’s 7th District is ordinary people doing extraordinary things in the name of social justice and change,” Sewell said. “We must always remember that there is work to be done – and there are always opportunities for every one of us to stand up for equality and justice.”

On Thursday, President Donald J. Trump declared February to be African American History Month.

“In the year 1619, a Dutch trading ship sailed into the Chesapeake Bay and dropped anchor at Point Comfort, Virginia,” Trump said. “The vessel’s arrival marked the beginning of the unscrupulous slave trade in the American colonies. It was from this immoral origin—and through inhuman conditions, discrimination and prolonged hardship — that emerged the vibrant culture, singular accomplishments and groundbreaking triumphs that we honor and celebrate during National African American History Month.”

“National African American History Month is an occasion to rediscover the enduring stories of African Americans and the gifts of freedom, purpose and opportunity they have bestowed on future generations,” Trump continued. “It is also a time to commemorate the countless contributions of African Americans, many of whom lived through and surmounted the scourge of segregation, racial prejudice and discrimination to enrich every fiber of American life. Their examples of heroism, patriotism and enterprise have given people of all backgrounds confidence, courage and faith to pursue their own dreams.”

“This year’s theme, Black Migrations, highlights the challenges and successes of African Americans as they moved from farms in the agricultural South to centers of industry in the North, Midwest and West — especially the migrations that occurred in the 20th century,” Trump added. “Through these migrations, millions of African Americans reshaped the demographic landscape of America, starting new lives in cities such as Philadelphia, Detroit, Chicago and New York City.”

Public Service Announcement

The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute will he holding a free screening of the movie “Buffalo Soldiers” as part of Black History month.

The Birmingham Civil Institute wrote: “Join us for a free film screening of Buffalo Soldiers: A Quest for Freedom, second film by local Alabama filmmakers, the Isabelle Brothers. A century and a half ago, Black soldiers, known as “Buffalo Soldiers” changed the face of the military forever. Despite their astonishing achievements in the face of heartbreaking adversity, the heroic bravery of these men has remained obscure. Until now! Buffalo Soldiers: A Quest for Freedom begins in the turbulent days leading to the Revolutionary War, traverses Frontier expansion and the Spanish American War and concludes with a modern perspective of military officers of color. This documentary chronicles, year by year, the extraordinary tale of these notable African-Americans and their invaluable service for our country.”

Sewell is serving her fifth term representing Alabama’s 7th Congressional district. She sits on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and is the vice chair of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee. Sewell is a chief deputy whip and serves on the prestigious Steering and Policy Committee of the Democratic Caucus. She is also a member of the Congressional Black Caucus, serves as vice chair of the Congressional Voting Rights Caucus and vice chair of Outreach for the New Democrat Coalition.

ADVERTISEMENT

Brandon Moseley is a senior reporter with eight and a half years at Alabama Political Reporter. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Facebook. Brandon is a native of Moody, Alabama, a graduate of Auburn University, and a seventh generation Alabamian.

Advertisement

Elections

First presidential debate is tonight

Tuesday’s debate, set to begin at 8 p.m. CST, will be moderated by Fox News Sunday anchor Chris Wallace.

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

President Donald Trump, left, and former Vice President Joe Biden, right, are running for president in 2020. (STAFF SGT. TONY HARP/AIR NATIONAL GUARD AND GAGE SKIDMORE/FLIKR)

President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joseph Biden, the Democratic nominee for president, are preparing for Tuesday night’s debate.

Tuesday’s debate will be moderated by Fox News Sunday anchor Chris Wallace. The debate will be at 8 p.m. CST and is being hosted at Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio.

Due to COVID-19, the two candidates and the moderator will not shake hands. There will be a small number of ticketed guests inside the debate hall, along with debate officials, crews and TV network anchors including Fox News.

Trump has prepared with help from former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and former New York City Major Rudy Giuliani but has chosen not to have traditional lengthy practice sessions.

Trump is suggesting he doesn’t want to overdo it.

“Sometimes you can go too much in that stuff,” Trump told reporters on Sunday.

Biden has been holding mock debate sessions with senior adviser Bob Bauer and top aides, according to CBS News.

Public Service Announcement

“I’m prepared to go out and make my case as to why I think he’s failed and why I think the answers I have to proceed will help the American people, the American economy and make us safer internationally,” Biden said.

“The president prepares by being president,” Trump campaign communications director Tim Murtaugh reportedly said. “And by regularly facing hostile news media. That’s pretty good practice by any measure.”

The debate as to whether Trump should have appointed Judge Amy Coney Barrett to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court created by the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg will almost certainly come up.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Joe Biden spent a lot of time in his basement to study up,” said Lara Trump, the president’s campaign adviser and daughter-in-law. “He’s been in this game for 47 years. I assume he’ll do OK. Quite frankly, the bar has been lowered so much for Joe Biden that if he stays awake for the whole thing it’s like maybe he won.”

The two candidates are running very different campaigns.

From March until the last week in August, according to news reports, Biden made no in-person speeches or campaign appearances. Biden’s events since have been rare and attended by just a few invited guests.

Trump, on the other hand, has been holding mass campaign rallies. Trump has held 14 in-person rallies in September including in swing states New Hampshire, Michigan, Wisconsin, Nevada, Florida, Virginia and Minnesota with multiple trips to Ohio, North Carolina and Pennsylvania.

Continue Reading

National

Planned Parenthood says Alabama is poised to outlaw abortion if Barrett is confirmed

“If Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed to the Supreme Court, Alabama could be at the center of the fight to overturn Roe v. Wade,” said Barbara Ann Luttrell, Planned Parenthood Southeast’s vice president of external affairs.

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

President Donald Trump, left, and his Supreme Court nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett. (WHITE HOUSE PHOTO)

President Donald Trump on Saturday nominated Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court, prompting Planned Parenthood to warn that Alabama could be poised to outlaw abortion if Barrett is confirmed to the nation’s highest court.

“If Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed to the Supreme Court, Alabama could be at the center of the fight to overturn Roe v. Wade,” said Barbara Ann Luttrell, Planned Parenthood Southeast’s vice president of external affairs. “Right now, 17 abortion-related cases are one step from the Supreme Court — including Alabama’s abortion ban. Most of these cases involve incremental restrictions that effectively ban abortion, without the need to overturn Roe. These incremental bans, combined with ‘trigger laws’ designed to immediately ban abortion if Roe were to fall, and with over 20 state legislatures hostile to reproductive health care, means that what little is left of abortion access could be eliminated for an estimated 25 million women of reproductive age with Barrett on the Supreme Court.”

Luttrell shared a full breakdown of the states where abortion is most under threat.

According to Planned Parenthood, more than 20 state legislatures, including Alabama, are hostile to reproductive health care, meaning that what little is left of abortion access could be eliminated for an estimated 25 million women of reproductive age with Barrett on the Supreme Court.

Last year, shortly after the Senate confirmed Justice Brett Kavanaugh, 25 abortion bans passed in 12 states: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, North Dakota, Ohio, Tennessee and Utah.

All of these laws have been blocked by lower courts and some are making their way up through the appeals process.

Since 2011, more than 480 abortion restrictions, such as mandatory waiting periods, two-trip requirements, bans on insurance coverage, and telehealth abortion bans, have passed in states, making it harder or impossible for people — particularly women with lower incomes — to access abortion services.

Public Service Announcement

Five states only have one abortion provider left: Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota and West Virginia.

According to Planned Parenthood, 10 states have trigger bans, laws designed to immediately ban all or nearly all abortions if Roe were to fall: Arkansas, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Tennessee and Utah.

Nearly half of the states have some combination of trigger bans, pre-Roe bans and hostile legislatures that position them to ban abortion quickly.

ADVERTISEMENT

In 2019, Illinois, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont enacted laws that would protect the right to abortion no matter what happens in the White House or at the Supreme Court.

In 2019, Vermont became the first state in U.S. history to advance a constitutional amendment process to make abortion a Constitutional right.

Pro-abortion state legislators in Massachusetts are pushing to guarantee abortion rights in the state. The Roe Act would enshrine the right to reproductive freedom into state law.

The majority of voters in Alabama voted in favor of a constitutional amendment to outlaw abortion if the controversial 5-to-4 1973 Roe v. Wade decision were overturned.

Continue Reading

Congress

Sewell urges Alabamians to participate in Census

There is only two days left for you and your family to get counted, so take action now.

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

Congresswoman Terri Sewell (via Office of Rep. Terri Sewell)

Congresswoman Terri Sewell, D-Alabama, is urging constituents to participate in the 2020 Census before time runs out.

“It was recently announced that Alabama ranked last in the nation in Census response with only 62 percent of all Alabama households having responded,” Sewell said. “The news is even more sobering for Alabama’s 7th Congressional District because we are at 6.8 [percentage points] below the State of Alabama in our return. In our district, the return rate for the 14 counties is 53.8 percent. This is devastating news! The time for Alabamians to be counted is running out with the Census deadline being moved up to Sept. 30.”

There are four ways to complete your 2020 Census:

  • Online at my2020census.gov. (Note: The Census ID number included on your original invitation letter is not required to complete the census online).
  • Call the U.S. Census Bureau toll-free at 844-330-2020. Telephone assistance is also available in multiple languages.
  • By mail: Return the paper form included with your invitation letter.
  • In person with a Census enumerator/representative that visits your home.

There is only two days left for you and your family to get counted, so take action now. All responses are kept confidential under federal law and are not shared with law enforcement, courts, creditors or other government agencies.

“According to a George Washington University study, each Alabamian that is not counted represents $1,600 so it is vital you and everyone in your household are counted,” Sewell added. “To learn more about how the Census impact vital federal resources Alabamians need and deserve, follow my #30Day30Ways Census campaign on my official Twitter.”

You can watch the full TerriTalks on making the 7th District count in the 2020 Census. Sewell is in her fifth term representing Alabama’s 7th Congressional District.

Continue Reading

Environment

Baldwin, Escambia and Mobile residents impacted by Sally urged to apply for federal aid

FEMA has approved $11.1 million in housing grants to individuals and families through Sept. 28, according to the governor’s office. 

Eddie Burkhalter

Published

on

Gov. Kay Ivey took a tour of the damage from Hurricane Sally on the gulf coast Friday September 18, 2020. (Governor's Office/Hal Yeager)

Gov. Kay Ivey on Monday announced more than $11 million in federal disaster aid has been approved for those impacted by Hurricane Sally in Baldwin, Escambia and Mobile counties.  

FEMA has approved $11.1 million in housing grants to individuals and families through Sept. 28, according to Ivey’s office. 

“Hurricane Sally took a punch to our coastal areas, but thanks in part to the millions of dollars in federal assistance, the people of Alabama are moving along the road to recovery,” Ivey said. “I remain grateful to President Trump, Administrator Gaynor and their teams for prioritizing the people of Alabama reeling from Hurricane Sally. We will get through this together; we have done it before, and we will do it again.”

Federal grants to repair homes or for renting temporary housing made up $8.9 million of the FEMA funding. Grants for childcare, moving and storage, medical and dental comprised the remaining $2.1 million. 

The U.S. Small Business Administration has approved an additional $570,900 in disaster home repair loans for those impacted by Sally.

Ivey’s office encourages homeowners and renters in Baldwin, Mobile and Escambia counties to apply to FEMA for federal disaster assistance as soon as possible. Residents of these three Alabama counties may also be eligible to receive assistance for uninsured and underinsured damage and losses resulting from the hurricane.

Residents in those three counties impacted by Hurricane Sally may register for FEMA disaster assistance online by visiting disasterassistance.gov or by calling 800-621-3362. Persons who are deaf, hard of hearing or have a speech disability and use a TTY may call 800-462-7585. Multi-lingual operators are available. The toll-free lines are open daily from 6 a.m. to midnight CST.

Public Service Announcement

Those with a homeowner’s insurance policy are encouraged to file an insurance claim before applying for federal assistance. 

Information that may be useful to have when you register include:

  • Address of the damaged primary dwelling where the damage occurred
  • Current mailing address
  • Current telephone number
  • Insurance information and description of disaster-caused damage and loss
  • Total household annual income
  • Names and birth dates of family members who live in the household
  • Name and Social Security number of co-applicant (if applicable)
  • Routing and account number for checking or savings account so FEMA may directly transfer disaster assistance funds

 For more information on Hurricane Say visit FEMA’s website here.

ADVERTISEMENT

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement