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Poll: Ivey has high approval rating; Trump, Shelby follow behind in Alabama

Gov. Kay Ivey delivers the 2019 state of the state address before a joint session of the Alabama Legislature in the Old House Chambers of the Alabama State Capitol on March 5, 2019. (Chip Brownlee/APR)

Gov. Kay Ivey has a strong approval rating among Alabama voters, a new poll released Wednesday shows. Her approval rating is bolstered by relatively high approval from voters across the aisle.

Ivey draws the strongest approval rating in Alabama at 60 percent approval, much higher than President Donald Trump, Sen. Richard Shelby or Sen. Doug Jones.

Just 28 percent of those polled said they disapprove of Ivey’s job performance. Twelve percent are unsure, according to the poll released from Mason-Dixon polling.

Mason-Dixon also asked Alabama voters about their perception of Shelby’s job performance and Trump’s performance. Both Republicans have a 52 percent approval rating in Alabama, a solidly red state where Trump won in 2016 with 62 percent of the vote.

Shelby did better in disapproval numbers. Thirty-five percent of Alabama voters polled said they disapproved of the veteran’s job performance. Thirteen percent were unsure.

Trump, on the other hand, has a disapproval rating on par with the state’s Democratic senator.

Forty-four percent of Alabama voters said they disapprove of Trump’s job performance — the same percentage of voters who said they disapprove of Jones’ job performance in a poll released Tuesday.

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Only four percent were undecided on Trump’s job performance.

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Trump’s approval rating the Mason-Dixon poll — a poll that tends to have a slight Republican bias, according to FiveThirtyEight — is lower than a March approval rating tracking poll from Morning Consult, that found that 58 percent of Alabama voters approved of Trump’s job approval.

His disapproval rating is much higher in the Mason-Dixon poll, conducted from April 9 through April 11. Forty-four percent said they disapprove of Trump in the Mason-Dixon poll, while only 35 percent disapproved in the Morning Consult poll from March.

Morning Consult has a slight Democratic bias, according to FiveThirtyEight. Morning Consult’s tracking poll has found that Trump’s net approval rating has decreased by 10 percentage points in Alabama since taking office.

Ivey, Trump and Shelby’s strongest job approval ratings come from Republicans, men, white voters and older voters. Trump’s job approval rating hit comes from his low performance with Democrats compared to Shelby and Ivey.

Ivey has relatively high job approval ratings among Democrats. Forty-one percent of Democrats said they approve of Ivey’s job performance, and 29 percent said they approve of Shelby’s job performance. Only four percent of Democrats said they approve of Trump’s job performance.

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But Trump performs better among Republicans. Eighty-seven percent of Republicans said they support Trump, while only 75 percent and 65 percent approve of Ivey and Shelby respectively.

The Jacksonville, Florida, based polling firm surveyed a total of 625 Alabama voters by telephone including both landlines and cell phones. The poll’s margin of error is plus or minus 4 percentage points.

 

Written By

Chip Brownlee is a former political reporter, online content manager and webmaster at the Alabama Political Reporter. He is now a reporter at The Trace, a non-profit newsroom covering guns in America.

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