Connect with us

National

Moore: The right to recognize God will be a main factor in his Senate campaign

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

Roy Moore speaks to reporters and supporters
Roy Moore is surrounded by supporters and media after leaving the Alabama Judicial Building in Montgomery, Ala., on Thursday October 27, 2016. (Mickey Welsh/Pool Photo)

Thursday, former Chief Justice Roy Moore announced that he will be a candidate for the U.S. Senate. Moore told reporters that the right to recognize God “will be a main factor” in his race for the U.S. Senate seat currently held by Sen. Doug Jones.

Moore suggested that a lot of the establishment opposition to him from Washington D.C. is due to his having been removed from the Alabama Supreme Court for defending his Ten Commandments monument from the Alabama Supreme Court building.

“A lot of them object to me because I was removed for displaying Ten Commandments,” Moore said.

“I don’t want to tempt y’all; but I will argue with anybody, to include the United States Supreme Court about the legality of this monumental display,” Judge Moore continued. “We have every right to recognize God. That will be a main factor in my race. If we don’t recognize God, we lose our right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. According to the organic law of this country, God is not religion. I hope the Supreme Court hears this. Religion was defined specifically by our founding fathers. We have forgotten. When we forget it, we forget the whole basis of the United States Constitution.”

“James Madison once said that ‘The real difficulty in the framing a form of government of men over men is that first you must enable the government to control the governed and then oblige her to control herself,’ Moore quoted.

“We are living in a society today where we have no problem obeying government and obeying laws,” Moore stated. “We are a very obedient people to our law. The supreme law of the land is the United States Constitution; but we do have a problem when government is out of control and does not control itself. It creeps into our lives taking away our basic liberties. The right of a child to be born. These are rights given by God, not by man. They can not be taken away. So I am in the race.”

Moore stressed that he has, “A belief that our rights come from God and that government can not take those rights from us.”

Advertisement

“Yes I will run for United States Senate in 2020,” Moore said. “Can I win? Yes I can win.”

“They know I can, that is why there is such opposition,” Moore added.

A reporter asked why he thinks he can win this time.

“Why do I think I can win? Because I think I won the last election if it were not for the false tactics used by the Democratic operatives in Washington D.C. and the false information that was put out,” Moore answered.

Moore blamed the “False flag operation” New Birmingham for his defeat in 2017. “Everyone knows that that last election was fraudulent,” Moore told reporters. The small operation — which the New York Times uncovered in December 2018 — cost about $100,000. The Times report suggested the experiment had little effect.

Moore dismissed the accusations leveled against him last time from several women who claimed they were abused by Moore in the 1970s as “false accusations.”

Moore predicted that the accusations would not hurt him this time around.

“They (the people of Alabama) see through it, and if they didn’t see through it then; they see through it now, with the things that happened to Kavanaugh.”

Moore joins a crowded field that already includes: Republican Congressman Bradley Byrne, State Rep. Arnold Mooney, businessman and former televangelist Stanley Adair, and former Auburn football coach Tommy Tuberville. State Auditor Jim Zeigler has formed an exploratory committee to look at entering the Senate race.

There are media reports that Congressman Gary Palmer is still considering entering the race. Secretary of State John Merrill will announce whether or not he is getting in the race later this month, but he has already signed FEC paperwork.

Sen. Richard Shelby told The Washington Post on Wednesday that he has encouraged former Senator Jeff Sessions to enter the race for his old seat.

The Republican primary will be Tuesday, March 3.

Duncan Lindsey, who manages the blog, Deer Stand Hill, has posted a video of the press conference.

 

Advertisement
Advertisement

Authors

Advertisement

Facebook