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Ivey appoints Marty Redden as secretary of OIT

Tuesday, Alabama Governor Kay Ivey (R)on announced that Marty Redden will serve as the Alabama Office of Information Technology Secretary. Redden has been serving as the acting secretary since July 2019.

“Since Marty stepped in to OIT as the acting secretary, he has run the agency effectively and with great prudence, and the state will certainly benefit from his leadership in this position,” Ivey said in a statement. “I am confident Marty will continue refining the agency, to make it run successfully and be accountable to the people of Alabama. His decades of experience in the technology field is already paying off for OIT and our other state agencies, which is why I am proud that he will continue serving in this capacity.”

Redden has three decades of experience in the field, include twenty years in management. He began his career in banking and finance technology. In 2007, he went to work for the state of Alabama. He has held high-level management positions in the Alabama Department of Corrections, the Alabama Medicaid Agency, and in the state Finance Department, before his time in the Office of Information Technology. While working with each of these agencies, Redden originated, led and implemented technology advancements and improvements.

“As secretary of OIT, my overriding mission is to provide Alabama’s state government with the best technology services at the smallest cost to the taxpayers we serve,” Redden said. “Every service that the state provides to its citizens involve some form of technology, so if we do our job well, countless Alabamians will get the help they need more quickly, efficiently and effectively. I appreciate the confidence Governor Ivey has placed in me and will work every day to prove it justified.”

Redden’s appointment is effective immediately.

Brandon Moseley is a former reporter at the Alabama Political Reporter.

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