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Opinion | Cannabis, like alcohol, should be legalized, taxed and regulated

Kevin Bardon

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State legislators will likely soon consider bills establishing a new state agency to improve Public Health by establishing the Compassion Act, creating an Alabama Medical Cannabis Commission, and amending ancillary law.

I wholeheartedly approve such efforts, yet that wasn’t always the case.

Years of waffling whether cannabis had any value whatsoever troubled me professionally. It gave rise to global narco-trafficking cartels, illicitly fueling an exorbitantly costly, deadly, and prolonged taxpayer-funded War on Drugs. Only later I learned that in 2016 writer Dan Baum interviewed Nixon Domestic Policy Advisor and Watergate co-conspirator John Erlichman who acknowledged that it was exclusively a political re-election tool concocted by the Nixon administration, and said “Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”

Now, I am permanently settled upon the matter: Cannabis, like alcohol, should be legalized, taxed and regulated for Medical, and Adult Recreational Use.

The DEA’s “Drugs of Abuse” 2017 resource guide officially acknowledged that, “No deaths from overdose of marijuana have been reported.” Not so of alcohol.

Scientific and sociological evidence is more than overwhelming: While not completely innocuous, cannabis has exceedingly far less risks associated with its consumption than alcohol. Even water has risks; one can drown in it, or die from water intoxication (excessive consumption in a short time). We cannot fully escape risk, but can and should manage it. “Just say no” has never worked, and “nanny state” prohibitions cannot continue.

Cannabis prohibition remains costly.

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Alabama taxpayers have long expended on average at least $22 million annually to enforce cannabis prohibition, to the detriment of solved crimes. ALEA states that in 2016, the TOTAL value of all stolen property was $257,279,623 with only 17 percent recovered. Property Crimes accounted for 85 percent of all crimes, with only a 22 percent Clearance Rate, while the 2012-2016 average rate for ALL crimes was only 25 percent. Clearly, something is wrong when Alabama’s Law Enforcement agencies cannot solve 88 percent of all Property Crimes, which account for 85 percent of all crimes – with 3 out of 4 crimes remaining unsolved.

A cynical view would be that Alabama’s Law Enforcement is either ineptly incompetent, or that priorities are misplaced with inordinate focus upon “shooting fish in a barrel” by continuing cannabis prohibition, arrests and prosecutions. It could hardly be both.

The Department of Forensic Sciences reported a 9-month backlog of nearly 10,000 pending cannabis cases as of March 31, 2018 – to the detriment of DNA/biology cases for 1121 serious crimes such as homicide, sexual assault, and robbery.

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Western University Economics Researchers found that Alabama taxpayers’ total averaged cost of cannabis prohibition from 2000-2010 was $219,000,000.

Three years after Maine decriminalized cannabis in 1976, a time/cost analysis found substantially positive results including reduced court/prosecution burden, reduced incarceration costs, and increased coffers from imposition of civil penalties in lieu of prosecution – they actually made money.

In unrelated studies, Washington State University and University of Bologna, Italy researchers found legalization, taxation, and regulation of cannabis for Medical and Adult Recreational Use resulted in decreased crime, Clearance Rate increases for burglaries and vehicle thefts, and that “recreational cannabis caused a significant reduction in rapes and thefts.”

This is not to say that cannabis-associated law enforcement will disappear once cannabis is legalized, taxed, and regulated, for it will not. It will, however, significantly reduce taxpayers’ burdens in Law Enforcement, Judicial, and Corrections costs, and free up valuable time and resources to focus upon solving serious crime.

Entrepreneurship, job creation, and revenue expansion via voluntary taxes upon a presently-illicit industry can be a largely self-sustaining, revenue-generating mechanism to supplement already badly-strained, and often inadequate, state and local resources. By legalizing, taxing, and regulating the Medical and Adult Recreational Use of cannabis, the state will empower itself to exercise increased, exact, and precise control over an already out-of-control, unregulated, untaxed underground business enterprise. It’s overtime to transform a liability into an asset.

Neither decriminalization nor legalization have increased underage use, nor DUIs. Rather, the opposite has occurred, and annual SAMHSA studies since 1975 have shown stable-to-declining use rates, say “most teens aren’t smoking marijuana,” that “5 out of 6 12-17 year olds have never tried marijuana,” and in Health Barometer: Alabama, Volume 4, found “Alabama’s average percent of marijuana use among adolescents ages 12-17 was lower than national average.” NSDUH found Alabama Teens’ Perceived Disapproving Attitudes 2002-2014 for peer use once or twice averaged 84.2 percent, despite the fact that a majority found availability “fairly” or “very easy.

Clearly, youth are not, and have not been using marijuana as some would have us believe.

Alabama’s problems are myriad, but wise solutions can be found, and it is up to us to improve our beloved state’s lot in life by actively participating in the process and educating ourselves, rather than perpetuating ignorance and fearfully shirking responsibility.

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Opinion | Amendment 4 is an opportunity to clean up the Alabama Constitution

Gerald Johnson and John Cochran

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(STOCK PHOTO)

The 1901 but current Alabama Constitution has been amended about 950 times, making it by far the world’s longest constitution. The amendments have riddled the Constitution with redundancies while maintaining language and provisions — for example, poll taxes — that reflect the racist intent of those who originally wrote it.

A recompilation will bring order to the amendments and remove obsolete language. While much of this language is no longer valid, the language is still in the document and has been noted and used by other states when competing with Alabama for economic growth opportunities.

The need for recompilation and cleaning of Alabama’s Constitution has been long recognized.

In 2019, the Legislature unanimously adopted legislation, Amendment 4, to provide for its recompilation. Amendment 4 on the Nov. 3 general election ballot will allow the non-partisan Legislative Reference Service to draft a recompiled and cleaned version of the Constitution for submission to the Legislature.

While Amendment 4 prohibits any substantive changes in the Constitution, the LRS will remove duplication, delete no longer legal provisions and racist language, thereby making our Constitution far more easily understood by all Alabama citizens.

Upon approval by the Legislature, the recompiled Constitution will be presented to Alabama voters in November 2022 for ratification.

Amendment 4 authorizes a non-partisan, broadly supported, non-controversial recompilation and much-needed, overdue cleaning up of our Constitution.

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On Nov. 3, 2020, vote “Yes” on Amendment 4 so the work can begin.

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Opinion | Auburn Student Center named for Harold Melton, first Auburn SGA president of color

Elizabeth Huntley and James Pratt

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Auburn University's Student Center (VIA AUBURN UNIVERSITY)

The year 1987 was a quiet one for elections across America but not at Auburn. That was the year Harold Melton, a student in international studies and Spanish, launched and won a campaign to become the first African American president of the Auburn Student Government Association, winning with more than 65 percent of the vote.

This was just the first of many important roles Harold Melton would play at Auburn and in an extraordinarily successful legal career in his home state of Georgia, where his colleagues on the Georgia Supreme Court elected him as chief justice.

Last week, the Auburn Board of Trustees unanimously named the Auburn student center for Justice Melton, the first building on campus that honors a person of color. The decision was reached as part of a larger effort to demonstrate Auburn’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.

In June, Auburn named two task forces to study diversity and inclusion issues. We co-chair the task force for the Auburn Board with our work taking place concurrently with that of a campus-based task force organized by President Jay Gogue. Other members of the Board task force are retired Army general Lloyd Austin, bank president Bob Dumas, former principal and educator Sarah B. Newton and Alabama Power executive Quentin P. Riggins.

These groups are embarking on a process that offers all Auburn stakeholders a voice, seeking input from students, faculty, staff, alumni, elected officials and more. It will include a fact-based review of Auburn’s past and present, and we will provide specific recommendations for the future.

We are committed to making real progress based on solid facts. Unlike other universities in the state, Auburn has a presence in all 67 counties through the Alabama Cooperative Extension System. Our review has included not only our campuses in Auburn and Montgomery but all properties across our state. To date, we have found no monuments or statues recognizing the history that has divided our country. We will continue our fact-finding mission with input from the academic and research community.

Our university and leadership are committed to doing the right thing, for the right reasons, at the right time. We believe now is the right time, and we are already seeing results.

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In addition to naming the student center for the Honorable Harold Melton, we have taken steps to highlight the significant role played by Harold Franklin, the student who integrated Auburn. We are working to enhance the historical marker that pays tribute to Mr. Franklin, and we are raising its visibility in campus tours as we pay homage to his contributions as our first African American student. Last month, we awarded Mr. Franklin, now 86 and with a Ph.D., a long-overdue master’s degree for the studies he completed at Auburn so many years ago.

We likewise endorsed a student-led initiative creating the National Pan-Hellenic Council Legacy Plaza, which will recognize the contributions of Black Greek organizations and African American culture on our campus.

In the coming months, Auburn men and women will work together to promote inclusion to further enhance our student experience and build on our strength through diversity. The results of this work will be seen and felt throughout the institution in how we recruit our students, provide scholarships and other financial support and ensure a culture of inclusion in all walks of university life.

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Our goal is to identify and implement substantive steps that will make a real difference at Auburn, impact our communities and stand the test of time.

Naming the student center for Justice Melton is but one example. In response to this decision, he said, “Auburn University has already given me everything I ever could have hoped for in a university and more. This honor is beyond my furthest imagination.”

Our job as leaders at Auburn is more than honoring the Harold Meltons and Harold Franklins who played a significant role in the history of our university. It is also to create an inclusive environment that serves our student body and to establish a lasting legacy where all members of the Auburn Family reach their fullest potential in their careers and in life.

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Opinion | Alabama lags behind the nation in Census participation with deadline nearing

Paul DeMarco

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(STOCK PHOTO)

The United States Census is starting to wind down around the country with a Sept. 30 deadline for the national population to be completed. However, a United States District Court has recently ruled that the date may be extended another 30 days to allow more time for the census to take place.

Regardless of the deadline, Alabama has work to do when it comes to the census.

To date, the national average for participation around the country has been almost 65 percent for the census.

Unfortunately, Alabama residents are providing data to the census at a lower percentage, around some 61 percent of the state population.

There is already concern among state leaders that if that number does not reach above 70 percent, then the state will lose a seat in Congress, a vote in the electoral college and millions of federal dollars that come to the state every year.

The percentage of participation has varied widely around the state, from a high of 76 percent in Shelby County to a low of 36 percent in neighboring Coosa County.

State leaders are making a final push to request Alabama residents fill out the census in the last month before it is closed.

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We will find out later this fall if Alabama passes the national average of participation in the census compared to other states to retain both its future representation and share of federal dollars.

In the meantime, Alabamians need to fill out their census forms.

The state is depending on it.

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Opinion | This Labor Day let’s honor Alabama’s workers

Bren Riley

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(STOCK PHOTO)

In July, the Southwest Alabama Labor Council made the tough decision to cancel what was going to be our 75th annual Labor Day Parade in Mobile in order to ensure the safety of our affiliates, members, and the general public.

Needless to say, I’m crushed. Each year, there’s nothing I look forward to more than gathering with union members far and wide to celebrate Alabama’s union members. After all we have been through in 2020, no one deserves a day of love and celebration more than our workers.

For many of us, Labor Day represents a day off to enjoy our last day of summer. But Labor Labor Day is so much more than just picnics and gearing up to go back to school—it is a day to honor America’s working people. In the face of this unprecedented pandemic, it’s important now more than ever to support Alabama’s workers first.

Unfortunately, Alabama was ranked the worst state in the country to work during the COVID-19 pandemic. When I first read this, I was heartbroken. Then I got angry.

The COVID-19 pandemic has spotlighted challenges that have always faced Alabama’s working people. Inequality. Poor working conditions. No mandated sick or family leave. For decades, Alabama’s labor movement has fought tooth and nail for these sorts of protections, only to be pushed back by members in Congress who want nothing more than to destroy unions at the expense of our working people.

In Steve Flowers’ Sept. 3 column, Flowers points out how different things were in Alabama not too long ago. From 1946-66, “Alabama was the most unionized state in the South by far. In fact, every major employer in the State of Alabama was a union shop.”

Ordinarily, I’d feel crushed reading such a statement. But like my anger mentioned earlier, this time around, I’m determined.

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This Labor Day, we have a chance to build back the power of the labor movement in our state by gearing up for what could be the most important elections in Alabama’s modern history.

At the forefront, we have the opportunity to elect Joe Biden as the President of the United States, thereby ending the most virulently anti-labor administration we have seen in the last century.

And here in Alabama, we all-in for the fight to re-elect Senator Doug Jones. Sen. Jones has been nothing but an ally to our working people, especially in pushing his Senate colleagues to take up HEROES Act — a comprehensive COVID-19 relief bill currently sitting untouched in Mitch McConnell’s lap.

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In total, the Alabama AFL-CIO has endorsed ten candidates running for office in 2020. By electing politicians who will fight for America’s working class and uplift the labor movement, we can keep making real progress in the fight for a fair economy and a just society.

This Labor Day, whether it’s time to head in after a socially-distanced gathering with loved ones or a Zoom call with friends, take the time to reflect on why we get to celebrate this holiday.  Labor unions bring the freedom to balance life and work — the freedom in knowing that one job is enough, that you can be with a sick child or parent without losing your job, that you can report hazards without being fired. This Labor Day, let’s get fired up for a better Alabama.

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