Connect with us

Governor

Kay Ivey ranked as 10th most popular governor in the country, poll shows

Jessa Reid Bolling

Published

on

Alabama Governor Kay Ivey is the 10th most popular governor in the U.S. and the most, according to a new poll.

The Morning Consult newest Governor Approval Ranking shows Ivey approval rating at 58 percent compared to a disapproval rating of 28 percent

Morning Consult conducted 493,910 surveys with registered U.S. voters from October 1 through December 31, 2019, to determine the 2019 Governor Rankings to measure the difference between the share of voters who approve of a governor’s job performance minus those who disapprove. 

In July of last year, her ranking from the previous Morning Consult Governor Approval Ranking poll showed her approval rating suffered a blow from previous polls, plummeting by 17 percent poll was conducted from April 1 through June 30 in the aftermath of Ivey signing the Alabama’s anti-abortion law that was considered to be the strictest anti-abortion legislation in the country.

Ivey’s newest approval rating puts her back in the top 10 most popular governors. She had previously been in the top 10 since taking over the position of governor after Robert Bentley resigned in April 2017. Ivey was elected to her first full term in November 2018. 

The top 10 most popular governors from the most recent approval ranking poll are: 

  1. Mark Gordon, Wyoming – 69 percent
  2. Larry Hogan, Maryland – 69 percent
  3. Charlie Baker, Massachusetts – 69 percent
  4. Phil Scott, Vermont – 65 percent
  5. Chris Sununu, New Hampshire – 59 percent
  6. Doug Burgum, North Dakota – 58 percent
  7. Ron DeSantis, Florida – 58 percent
  8. Greg Abbott, Texas – 58 percent
  9. Asa Hutchinson, Arkansas – 58 percent
  10. Kay Ivey, Alabama – 58 percent

Jessa Reid Bolling is a reporter at the Alabama Political Reporter and graduate of The University of Alabama with a B.A. in journalism and political science. You can email her at [email protected] or reach her via Twitter.

Advertisement

Governor

Legislature returns to a much different Statehouse

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

The Alabama Legislature will return from their spring break vacation Tuesday, but nothing is the same as it was two weeks ago.

Monday, the press was informed that the corps will be removed from the press rooms behind the chambers. Those rooms are being given to the legislators so that they can sit the necessary six feet apart. The press will move to the gallery looking down on the House Chambers. That will be our space exclusively as the public and the lobbyists are barred. The additional space will allow members of the press to also stay a minimum of six feet apart to avoid transmission of the coronavirus.

The Alabama Political Reporter asked if we would still have access to the fifth-floor lobby where citizens and lobbyists regularly met with members of the legislature who stepped off of the House floor. APR was told that we would not have access to any part of the fifth floor except by appointment and that extended to the entire Statehouse building.

Legislators were told in a conference call that if they feel sick, are showing symptoms of anything that they should just stay away from today’s meeting which is not essential. Legislators will gavel in and set April 17 as their next meeting date.

The reason they have to gavel in is that if they do not the session would automatically end and the constitutionally mandated budgets for the 2021 fiscal year beginning on October 1 have not been passed yet.

State Rep. Tim Wadsworth, R-Arley, said that the legislator spoke with Gov. Kay Ivey and her team as well as legislative leaders.

Wadsworth said that they were told that conference calls are helpful and that members will receive a letter detailing the procedures to be followed by the members for the rest of this legislative year. There will be no visitors in the State House and all voting will be by voice so there will be no touching of voting machines.

The governor was to participate in a conference call with President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence later that day.

Advertisement

Ivey told them that Alabama will test for counterfeit supplies and watch for coronavirus scams and that the state will have an advance web site operating later this week. The state is, “Working with various Alabama companies to manufacture and produce various medical safety products.”

Wadsworth said that they were told that the state had had 831 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 15 reported deaths, though not all had been confirmed by the Alabama Department of Public Health, by that morning and that there were over 2500 deaths already in the United States.

Wadsworth said that the subject of hospitals came up. Hospitals are looking at expanding their ICU (intensive care unit) areas to deal with the demand for intensive care beds by COVID-19 patients. Hospital rooms are freeing up due to the elimination of elective procedures.

Wadsworth said also that the Apple Company, through President Tim Cook, is delivered 100,000 N-95 masks and surgical masks, the schools will not reopen physically this year, and teachers, workers and aides will practice social distancing when they go back into the school buildings on April 6,

Wadsworth said that State Superintendent Eric Mackey told them that the focus will be on graduating and getting students ready for this year. The State Board of Education building is being cleaned.

Legislators were informed that the Alabama National Guard is ready for when they are needed.

Wadsworth said that they were told that teletherapy will be used for mental health patients except for extreme patients. A 24/7 mental health help telephone lines available and that mental health patients are only being discharged when teletherapy is available at home.

Wadsworth said that State Finance Director Kelly Butler assured them that, “All vendors are being paid.” In the first six months of the fiscal year revenue held up good; but that he anticipates a decline though in revenues for the last six months of the current fiscal year. Butler did not anticipate calling for proration due to the strong first six months of the year. $300 million is being moved from the stabilization fund to the education trust fund (ETF) to ensure stable budget.

The 2020 legislative session will end by May 18.

Continue Reading

Governor

Census could cost Alabama a congressional seat

Jessa Reid Bolling

Published

on

With the 2020 Census underway, Alabama could be at risk of losing a congressional seat due to a slowly growing population.

Census data also determines the number of seats each state has in the House of Representatives. Congressional and state legislative districts are also drawn using census data. 

The census results will also show what communities need certain services like roads, schools, clinics and more.

The results will also determine the amount of federal funds that will be allocated to programs like Medicaid, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Head Start and others. 

Projections from The Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama (PARCA) indicate the loss of a Congressional seat and that Alabama is vulnerable to be the state that loses that seat due to a low growing population. 

PARCA found that Alabama’s population grew 2.3 percent since 2010 and that every other southeastern state, except Mississippi, has outpaced Alabama’s population growth rate. Nationally, 34 states grew their population faster than Alabama did between 2010 and 2018. 

As of March 25, Alabama’s self-participation rate is slightly ahead of the nation at 27.7 percent compared to 26.2 percent. For comparison, the state’s final self-response rate in 2010 was 62.5%. Within Alabama, Autauga County leads all counties at 33.4 percent. 

“An accurate Census count is now more important than ever as state and local governments will be coping with a very different post-pandemic reality,” a statement from PARCA read. 

Advertisement

To ensure all Alabamians are counted in the 2020 Census, an advisory group called Alabama Counts! was formed to promote the census at the state and local level. 

“Even if the efforts of Alabama Counts! Are exceedingly successful, Alabama may well lose a congressional seat,” PARCA’s projection read. “Census workers simply cannot count people who are not here. And Alabama is simply not growing as fast as other states.”

Click here to begin filling out the 2020 Census questionnaire. 

Continue Reading

Governor

State ramping up for COVID-19 fight

Brandon Moseley and Nicole Jones

Published

on

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey, State Health Officer Scott Harris, Commerce Secretary Greg Canfield, Public Health Commissioner Lynn Beshear and Alabama National Guard Major General Sheryl Gordon briefed state legislators Monday about how the state intends to address the looming wave of COVID-19 cases as the virus spread across the state of Alabama virtually unchecked.

Ivey said that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has a team in the Montgomery area currently visiting the six major metro areas in our state studying existing facilities that can be used to provide additional hospital beds. The new hospitals would be in the greater Huntsville, Birmingham, Montgomery, Mobile, Tuscaloosa and Auburn areas.

U.S. Army Major General Diana Holland, who commands the South Atlantic Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, will be working with the Alabama Department of Public Health on this effort and will provide a report on their findings later this week.

It was explained that hotels provide the easiest conversion to hospitals as they already have bathrooms connected to each room and are built to handle large numbers of guests and staff.

Harris told the legislators that there were 831 cases of COVID-19 in Alabama as Monday morning, that number has risen now to nearly 1,000, and that there already have been 15 deaths reported, though the ADPH has publicly acknowledged 13 because not all have been officially investigated yet. The United States is up to 2,500 deaths nationwide.

Harris said that clinics are opening in Macon and Dallas counties on Monday, in Wilcox County Wednesday, and Houston on Thursday to provide more testing in the Wiregrass and Blackbelt. There are now 30 pop-up sites in these areas.

Harris said that hospitals are using available space to add additional ICU areas and that hospital unnecessary capacity has been diminished due to a recent health order prohibiting elective procedures.

Harris said that the ADPH has received its third and final shipment of personal protection equipment from our strategic national stockpile allocation. A certain amount of that is going to hotspot hospitals in crisis right now using the same formula based on the size and reported needs of the counties.

Advertisement

Canfield said that his Department is working diligently to identify companies across Alabama that can manufacture PPE or who can quickly learn how to make the items we are most in need of. Canfield said that they have identified 30 companies so far.

Gordon said that the Alabama National Guard is assisting with logistics and warehousing of vital supplies. The Guard’s 12,000 soldiers and airmen are ready to serve. Gordon said that the Guard is abiding by CDC guidelines for the safety of the soldiers and airmen.

State Finance Director Kelly Butler said that his Department’s goal is to continue operations with social distancing and ensure that payments are made to health providers, Medicaid, and vendors that provide services.

Butler said that they implemented plans that allow them to do remote work with employees working at home continuing to process payments and transactions. “All vendors are being paid,” Butler said.

Butler warned that the revenues that are coming in for the 2020 budget will decline; but we have not seen a decline in the first six months of the fiscal year.

“We think that March receipts are based on February economic activity and expect to see sales and income tax decline in April’s numbers,” Butler said.

Butler said that because of the strong first six months, we do not expect to call for proration in the remainder of this fiscal year, which ends on Sept. 30.

Ivey included changes to normal purchasing rules so Alabama can acquire the PPE we need.

Beshear said that the community mental health centers are using telemedicine. Home visits are required only in extreme cases.

President Donald Trump has extended his social distancing order to 30 April, Ivey said.

“Remember the 6-foot rule,” she said.

The U.S. is confronted with an unparalleled health threat.

On Sunday, noted Trump coronavirus task force member Dr. Anthony Fauci told CNN’s Jake Tapper that a lot of Americans are going to die.

“I mean, looking at what we’re seeing now, I would say between 100,000 and 200,000,” Fauci said. “We’re going to have millions of cases.”

Continue Reading

Governor

SPLC: Ivey’s statements on absentee balloting “irresponsible”

Jessa Reid Bolling

Published

on

The Southern Poverty Law Center condemned Governor Kay Ivey’s comments saying she would not advocate for “no-excuse absentee voting” during the COVID-19 outbreak, calling her comments “irresponsible.”

Currently, to receive an absentee ballot, the voter must submit a valid reason as to why they are unable or unwilling to vote at a polling place. “No-excuse” absentee voting would allow any registered voter to request an absentee without requiring that the voter state a reason for his/her desire to vote absentee.

During a conference call on Tuesday, Ivey discussed whether “no-excuse absentee voting” should be allowed amid the COVID-19 outbreak.

“At this time I would not advocate for a legislative change to allow that to happen,” Ivey said. “In a state-of-emergency the Secretary of State can adopt an emergency amend rule related to absentee voting. Anyone concerned with the virus can select a box and the box is called ‘I am ill or have an infirmity.’

“My thought is that if anyone can submit an absentee vote without a valid reason it raises the potential for voter fraud and, y’all, in the middle of a public health crisis we don’t need to open that up and add extra problems to our plate.” 

Ivey announced on March 18 that the primary runoff election, which was scheduled for March 31, will be held on July 14, 2020, over concerns surrounding the health and safety of Alabamians voting during the COVID-19 pandemic. The election will include the headline race for the GOP nomination for Senate.

Nancy Abudu, deputy legal director for the SPLC, released a statement on Wednesday, saying Ivey’s lack of consideration for “no-excuse absentee voting” will leave thousands of people disenfranchised if they cannot vote by mail.

“Through a worldwide public health crisis with no clear end in site, Governor Kay Ivey and Alabama’s leaders are digging in their heels to expand voter suppression in the state in a way that will impact not only communities of color and low-income individuals, but senior citizens and those taking care of sick family members as well among those directly impacted by COVID-19.  Governor Ivey’s use of the myth of voter fraud as an excuse to prevent Alabamians from having a safe way to vote by mail in future elections is irresponsible, shows a total lack of leadership on a critical issue, and will undermine our democratic process.”

Advertisement

“Meanwhile on the same day hours earlier, Georgia’s Secretary of State committed to sending every eligible, active voter an absentee ballot request form in the state’s rescheduled primary election. Expanding no-excuse absentee balloting, implementing early voting, and recruiting less at-risk poll workers are bare minimum policies Alabama should do to avoid electoral disasters in its primary run-off in July and in the general election in November.” 

Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill said on Monday that Alabamians can vote by absentee ballot amid the COVID-19 outbreak. 

“Amid coronavirus concerns, it is important to remember that Alabamians who are concerned about contracting or spreading an illness have the opportunity to avoid the polls on Election Day by casting an absentee ballot,” Merrill said in a press release Monday. “Alabamians can access the application online or by visiting or calling their local Absentee Election Manager’s office. 

“Any qualified voter who determines it is impossible or unreasonable to vote at their polling place shall be eligible to check the box on the absentee ballot application that is most applicable to that individual,” the Secretary of State’s office said. “State law allows the Secretary of State to issue absentee voting guidance during declared states of emergency, allowing Secretary Merrill to encourage voters to check the box which reads as follows (in the case none of the boxes are appropriate):

“I have a physical illness or infirmity which prevents my attendance at the polls. [ID REQUIRED]”

The deadline to register to vote in the July 14 election is Monday, June 29. The deadline to submit an absentee ballot application is Thursday, July 9. The deadline to return an absentee ballot to the Absentee Election Manager is the close of business Monday, July 13. And the last day to postmark an absentee ballot is Monday, July 13. 

Voters can request an absentee ballot application by calling the Secretary of State’s office at 334-242-7210.

More information on absentee ballot voting can be found on the Alabama Secretary of State website.

 

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Authors

Advertisement

The V Podcast

Facebook

Trending

.