Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

Elections

CAIR announces support for Amendment 4

Amendment 4 will be on the Nov. 3 general election ballot.

The Alabama Constitution

The Council on American-Islamic Relations expressed their support for a proposed state constitutional amendment on Alabama’s November ballot to remove outdated, racist language from the Alabama Constitution.

Amendment 4 would remove references to school segregation and terms such as “colored children” from the Alabama Constitution.

“Remnants of anti-Black racism and white supremacy must be removed from places of honor in Alabama and nationwide,” said CAIR’s national communications director, Ibrahim Hooper. “Leaving racist laws and symbols in place only perpetuates the vicious legacy of white supremacy.”

In 2000, Alabama voters voted to remove a constitutional ban on interracial marriage. Alabama was the last state to remove a ban on interracial marriage. That ban, as well as school segregation, had already been ruled unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Racist language to be removed includes Section 256 of Article XIV, which states: “Separate schools shall be provided for white and colored children, and no child of either race shall be permitted to attend a school of the other race.”

Hooper said the American Muslim community and CAIR are standing in solidarity with all those challenging anti-Black racism, xenophobia, Islamophobia, anti-Semitism and white supremacy.

Amendment 4 will be on the Nov. 3 general election ballot. Alabama has the longest and oldest state constitution.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

CAIR describes itself as America’s largest Muslim civil liberties and advocacy organization. Its mission is to enhance understanding of Islam, protect civil rights, promote justice and empower American Muslims.

Written By

Brandon Moseley is a former reporter at the Alabama Political Reporter.

DIG DEEPER

State

At 31, Ashley Jones is also the youngest poet laureate ever selected in Alabama.

Featured Opinion

But hey, it’s the holidays. So prove me wrong.

State

A little-known clash in Tuscaloosa in 1964, known as Bloody Tuesday, was ground zero in the city's struggle over civil rights.

Opinion

There is much to do to overcome racial disparities. Advancing health equity requires a dedicated, coordinated and honest approach to this challenge.