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Five people indicted on conspiracy to transport illegal aliens

The maximum penalty for conspiracy to transport illegal aliens within the United States is 10 years in prison.

(STOCK PHOTO)

A federal grand jury indicted five individuals on Tuesday for transporting illegal aliens within the United States, federal prosecutors said.

U.S. Attorney Prim F. Escalona and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Homeland Security Investigations Special Agent in Charge Robert Hammer announced the indictments Wednesday.

A three-count indictment was filed in U.S. District Court charging the indicted with conspiracy to transport illegal aliens within the United States, for unlawful employment of illegal aliens and money laundering.

The five individuals charged were: Crystal Gail Escalante, age 37 of Haleyville; Deivin Marquitos Escalante-Vasques, age 30 of Haleyville; Adan Riz-Simaj, age 33; Carlos Gutierrez-Gabriel, age 23; and Tomas Gabriel-Adjualip, age 30.

According to the indictment, between January 2018 and October 2020, the defendants transported and employed illegal aliens in Walker and Winston counties.

The maximum penalty for conspiracy to transport illegal aliens within the United States is 10 years in prison. The maximum penalty for unlawful employment of illegal aliens is 10 years in prison. The maximum penalty for money laundering is 20 years in prison.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Homeland Security Investigations investigated the case. Assistant U.S. Attorney Russell Penfield is prosecuting the case.

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An indictment contains only charges. All the defendants are entitled to a vigorous defense and are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Written By

Brandon Moseley is a senior reporter with over nine years at Alabama Political Reporter. During that time he has written 8,794 articles for APR. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Facebook. Brandon is a native of Moody, Alabama, a graduate of Auburn University, and a seventh generation Alabamian.

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