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Alabama-based Hi.Ed partners with Butler County Schools

The web-based platform is a way “to deliver students to careers,” allowing students to identify, explore and prepare for career pathways.

college students in computer room
(STOCK)

Alabama-based Hi.Ed on Wednesday announced that Butler County Schools will be the latest to utilize its innovative online guidance management system to benefit students and their families.

Due to vital support from the city of Greenville and the Butler County Commission for Economic Development, BCS is the latest public education entity in the state of Alabama to join the growing Hi.Ed team.

Hi.Ed, which stands for Hyper-Individualized Education Design, offers a comprehensive educational resource with five core components: Academics, Virtual Life, Compresults Tracking Tool, The Market and Athletics/NCAA Eligibility. The company is a member of Birmingham’s renowned Innovation Depot community.

Hi.Ed founder Duwan Walker has summarized that the web-based platform is a way “to deliver students to careers,” allowing students to identify, explore and prepare for career pathways. This includes not only four-year degrees but also two-year degrees and skills training.

Wednesday’s announcement continues Hi.Ed’s overarching mission.

“We are thrilled and honored to partner with the City of Greenville, Butler County Schools, and the Butler County Commission for Economic Development as we continue to improve the educational path to success for every student,” said Duwan Walker, CEO and founder of Hi.Ed.Our system will assist with bridging the gaps of confusion and uncertainty and serve all students, parents, administrators, and other stakeholders by joining one another under one practical platform, creating a clear line of transparency from school to home, and then later connecting students to the workforce. Hi.Ed will stand alongside the City of Greenville, Butler County Schools, and the Butler County Commission for Economic Development, and together, we will be a catalyst in helping guide our future leaders to a world full of opportunities.”

“I’m extremely excited about the implementation of this program and thankful to be part of something this special,” said Patrick Peagler, the founder and owner of Training to Live LLC, who will help implement Hi.Ed for BCS. Many school systems across the country have struggled and some are still struggling with the unforeseen pandemic. I’m hopeful that this program will provide resources to help our students in Butler County.

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Hi.Ed is an effective educational tool that will significantly impact how we serve our high students and parents,” said Rheta McClain, career tech director for BCS. At the same time, it simultaneously helps us refocus how we interact with colleges and the local workforce. School and district personnel can utilize data from Hi.Ed to partner with community organizations, colleges, and workforce companies to provide information and post-high school opportunities that align closely with students’ interests. Progress toward graduation, NCCA eligibility, progress towards college admission, workforce readiness, and more will be easily accessible by high school students and parents in one centralized location. This program will enhance our ability to ensure that all high school students feel supported as they progress towards becoming Butler County School System graduates prepared for the next level of their choosing – whether for the military, college, or the workforce.

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The Alabama Political Reporter is a daily political news site devoted to Alabama politics. We provide accurate, reliable coverage of policy, elections and government.

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