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Expansion of Alabama G.I. Dependent Scholarship Program takes effect June 1

The legislation adds some private institutions to schools covered, and adds service in the Space Force as qualifying military service.

flags of Department of Veterans Affairs and USA painted on cracked wall

A law that will expand Alabama’s G.I. Dependent Scholarship Program is set to go into effect June 1. 

The legislation adds qualifying private institutions to the list of schools covered by the program, and adds service in the Space Force as qualifying military service. The program is administered by the Alabama Department of Veterans Affairs. 

“We want to thank the Alabama Legislature for working with us to pass this version of the bill that offers this great program to more of Alabama’s Veterans,” said Alabama Department of Veterans Affairs Commissioner Kent Davis in a statement. “The Alabama G.I. Dependent Scholarship Program is first class, and we look forward to working with eligible students and private institutions around the state in assisting any way we can.”

Senate Bill 119, introduced by Sen. Will Barfoot, R-Pike Road, expands the program to include certain private institutions of higher learning, in addition to the public institutions already covered under the program. 

 Eligible students attending a newly added private institution can receive up $250 per credit hour, and up to $1,000 for textbooks and instructional fees each semester, after other grants and scholarships have been spent, according to a press release from the Alabama Department of Veterans Affairs.

The program had 16,425 students enrolled during the fiscal year 2021. Prospective students seeking to use scholarships this fall are encouraged to apply as soon as possible. Anyone needing assistance may visit one of our 61 Veterans Service Offices around the state.

Written By

Eddie Burkhalter is a reporter at the Alabama Political Reporter. You can email him at [email protected] or reach him via Twitter.

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