Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

News

Gov. Kay Ivey proclaims Municipal Government Week

There are currently 465 incorporated municipalities in the state.

Pictured left to right: ALM Deputy Director Kayla Bass, Priceville Councilmember Charles Black, Dothan Mayor Mark Saliba, Gov. Kay Ivey, Hartselle Mayor Randy Garrison, Foley Mayor Ralph Hellmich and ALM Executive Director Greg Cochran.
Getting your Trinity Audio player ready...

Gov. Kay Ivey, on Thursday, signed an Alabama League of Municipalities’ (ALM) sponsored proclamation declaring May 12-18, 2024, as Municipal Government Week in the state of Alabama. The goal of this week is to remind Alabamians of the important role local government plays in providing essential quality of life services.

Gov. Ivey said, “I encourage all Alabamians to be involved in their local municipal government while also recognizing the importance of good government at every level, but especially on the local level.”

There are currently 465 incorporated municipalities in the state. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, over 60 percent of Alabamians live in municipalities, with many more working in them. Municipal government provides services such as police and fire protection, street maintenance, water and sewer services, parks and recreation, and garbage collection, all while also providing numerous educational, recreational and economic development opportunities.

“The League appreciates Gov. Ivey for supporting local government and proclaiming next week as Municipal Government Week,” ALM Executive Director Greg Cochran said. “We encourage Alabamians to show support for their municipalities and to thank local officials for their tireless efforts during this time.”

ALM was established on May 15, 1935, and its membership is comprised of over 450 cities and towns. The organization supports various sized local governments through legislative advocacy, legal assistance and training for elected officials. 

“Local government has a major impact on the lives of its citizens. Yet, many Alabamians do not have an understanding about all the daily services cities and towns provide to their communities,” ALM President Randy Garrison, mayor of Hartselle said. “Local government is the closest, most responsive form of government to the people. Therefore, I encourage citizens to find opportunities to strengthen relationships with their local leaders.”

Four Alabama cities have populations greater than 185,000, while 59 have populations greater than 12,000. Meanwhile, there are 406 municipalities with a population less than 12,000, and 135 have less than 500.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

“Elected officials in local municipal governments have the opportunity to collaborate, communicate and serve in the closest of relationships with the citizens that they live, work and play with every day,” ALM Vice President Mark Saliba, mayor of Dothan, said. “As a native of Dothan, it brings me great joy to serve my city and the League in helping to share the unique stories of how every municipality contributes to the strength and well-being of our great state.”

The Alabama Political Reporter is a daily political news site devoted to Alabama politics. We provide accurate, reliable coverage of policy, elections and government.

More from APR

Economy

This ambitious project seeks to weave together communities, nonprofits, and academic institutions across Alabama.

State

The competition will conclude Tuesday, Sept. 4 following Labor Day weekend.

State

The Alabama League of Municipalities on Friday elected Randy Garrison, mayor of Hartselle, as its new president.

Legislature

The Alabama League of Municipalities and several mayors and public officials expressed opposition to the bill, saying it would decimate their revenue streams.