Kathy Peterson Running for Public Service Commission

December 26, 2011

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

Kathy Peterson is running as a Republican for President of the Alabama Public Service Commission (PSC). Kathy spoke in an exclusive interview with the Alabama Political Reporter on December 23.

Peterson says that she is running for President of the Alabama Public Service Commission because “this is a job I am highly qualified for.” She says that she has 30 years of management experience and has experience working with the PSC in Georgia when she worked for Southern Bell. Peterson says that she has the education and business experience to head the PSC. She said, “I can work with anybody to get things done,” but she added that she “can be hardnosed when I need to be.” She cited her experience working with fortune 500 companies as making her qualified for the PSC head job. Kathy also said that she “has a lot of common sense.”
Read More

Bill Britt: Laws and unintended consequences

December 26, 2011

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

As a general rule any law written by the hand of man is burdened with unintended consequences. Only the ten commandments handed down by God to Moses are without unintended consequences. Naturally a trial lawyer or the ACLU would sue God over the big ten but many don’t know Him or believe that He exists.

In light of this, it should come as no surprise that Alabama has laws that create problems beyond the imaginings of the lawmakers.
Read More

Republican Presidential Race Trending Toward Being Three Person Race

December 26, 2011

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

In the race for the Republican Presidential nomination Real Clear Politics has Texas Congressman Ron Paul leading the polls in Iowa with 23.8 percent of the vote as we count down towards the Iowa Caucus on January 3.  Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney is in a close second with 20.3 percent.  Former Georgia Congressman Newt Gingrich is still close at 17.3 percent.  Texas Governor Rick Perry is polling at 11.8 percent, followed by Minnesota Congresswoman Michelle Bachman with 8.3 percent, former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum 7 percent, and former Utah Governor Jon Huntsman with 3 percent.  The Real Clear Politics number comes from averaging the four results of the most recent polls and there is a lot of variation in the Iowa polling.  For examples, Rasmussen has Romney leading in Iowa by 5 percent while the Iowa State University, Iowa Globe Gazette, channel KCRG poll has Romney in third behind Paul and Gingrich.
Read More

Cullman Times: Signs of hope for 2012

December 26, 2011

CULLMAN — Alabama’s unemployment drop in November tied the state for second largest decrease in the nation.

The state also holds the third-lowest unemployment rate in the Southeast.

News of this type is a welcome sign as 2011 draws to a close. With unemployment rate now at 8.7 percent, the state is almost level with the nation’s rate of 8.6 percent. In the region, Alabama is showing one of the stronger comebacks among states.

The rebound in Alabama has been stronger than some economists anticipated, and that’s particularly true in Cullman County where the unemployment rate has dropped even lower.

Read More…

Anniston Star: The damage of a bad tax policy: State’s low property taxes have helped few and hurt many

December 26, 2011

Earlier this year, a federal judge handed down a ruling in a case brought by parents in two rural Alabama counties. The parents claimed that Alabama’s constitutionally mandated property-tax system, which keeps assessments and revenue down, was created to protect large property holders and limit funding for black schools.

In an 800-page ruling, the judge agreed that the property-tax system set up in the 1901 Constitution was designed to keep taxes low and benefit planters and industrialists with extensive mineral holdings. The judge also agreed that by limiting property taxes, the writers of the Constitution made it difficult, if not impossible, for rural, predominately black schools to receive adequate funding.

However, in what the judge admitted was a disappointing decision to reach, the purpose of the limitation was not to discriminate against black students. The purpose was to protect the pocketbooks of the powerful. What happened to minority children was simply collateral damage.

Read More…

George Wallace Jr. reflects on his father, family in his new book

December 26, 2011

Staff Report

A man whose very name is synony­mous with Alabama politics has made his last run for office, and has entered a new chapter in his professional life — that of a self-published author.

George Wallace Jr. has been busy late­ly, mailing off copies of his new book, “Governor George Wallace: The Man You Never Knew,” which is available on his website, www.georgewallacejr.com, for $34.95.

The book is a memoir, written in first person, that winds through a very wide ar­ray of topics: His once controversial fa­ther, the four-time governor and presiden­tial hopeful, at one time a symbol of racism but later apologetic and forgiven; his be­loved mother, also a former governor, who lost her battle with cancer; and his own life, growing up in the governor’s mansion and in the public eye, learning to come to terms with the Wallace legacy.
Read More

Judges blocking “reasonable suspicion” provisions in state laws

December 26, 2011

Staff Report

Alabama can claim this distinction: It’s the only state where a federal judge has upheld the “reasonable suspicion” provision of its immigration law.

A federal judge in South Carolina on Thursday blocked a portion of that state’s immigration law authorizing law enforcement to detain those they have “reasonable suspicion” of being in the country unlawfully.

The ruling — following decisions by courts in Arizona and Georgia to block similar provisions in those states’ laws — encouraged critics of Alabama’s statute, known as HB 56, but a former federal judge said it’s unlikely to impact the litigation over Alabama’s law.
Read More

Prichard considering teen curfew; city could follow Mobile’s lead

December 26, 2011

Staff Report

MOBILE, Alabama — Nearly three months after Mobile approved a teen curfew, the city of Prichard is considering a curfew of its own.

Councilman Troy Ephriam introduced an ordinance earlier this month nearly identical to the one the Mobile City Council approved in October.

The ordinance would:

* Bar those under the age of 18 from remaining in public spaces after 11 p.m. on school nights and midnight on Fridays and Saturdays and on holidays.
Read More

Unemployment extension 101: what the payroll tax deal means for the jobless

December 26, 2011

Staff Report

Congress’ decision to reauthorize the current federal unemployment program for two months is like a holiday gift for some 2.9 million Americans who would have otherwise lost their benefits in that time.

Now, people who lost their jobs in July and August and were collecting 26 weeks of state unemployment can move on to the federal Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC) program. This will give them benefits for an additional 20 weeks.
Read More

Poll: Christianity Remains Dominant Religion in the United States

December 26, 2011

Staff Report

PRINCETON, NJ — This Christmas season, 78% of American adults identify with some form of Christian religion. Less than 2% are Jewish, less than 1% are Muslim, and 15% do not have a religious identity. This means that 95% of all Americans who have a religious identity are Christians.

Read More…

© Copyright 2017 Alabama Political Reporter