Hubbard’s Lee County Trial Finally Ends in Silence

September 14, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

MONTGOMERY—The post-trial appeal of convicted felon and former Speaker of the House, Mike Hubbard, finally expired on September 8, in silence, according to the Attorney General’s office calculations.

For almost four years, Hubbard, aided by his criminal lawyers, used the State House, the Governor’s Office and some within the Attorney General’s office to deny, deflect and delay justice. Hubbard stormed the State House presiding over an orgy of greed and corruption. Those days are over for Hubbard and so is any appeal before the circuit court of Lee County.
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Judge Walker Files Hubbard Sentencing With Alacourt

August 11, 2016

By Susan Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

OPELIKA—Judge Jacob Walker, III, officially filed Michael G. Hubbard’s sentence with Alacourt on Wednesday.

Hubbard was found guilty on 12 charges of using his office for personal gain on June 10. Judge Walker handed down his sentence on Hubbard for a total of 96 years, 21.5 month split sentence and 76.5 years probation. All but two of the sentences run concurrent to the others.
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Hubbard Sentenced to 96 Years

July 11, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

MONTGOMERY—Almost two years after his indictment, Michael G. Hubbard was convicted and sentenced to 96 years, with a split sentence of 4 years in State prison, with no “good time” or chance of parole, and 16 years supervised probation. Judge Jacob Walker, III, also ordered Hubbard to pay fines equaling $210, 000 plus other court costs.

SEE SENTENCING BY COUNT

The State asked the Court to require Hubbard to pay $1,125,000.00 in restitution. Judge Walker denied the State’s request saying, there no case law showing the State as victim. However, he gave the State 30 days to show case law where a state is considered a victim.
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Hubbard: Defiant and Unrepentant

July 11, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Politcal Reporter

Michael G. Hubbard received a sentence of 96 years for his crimes.

However, because he was convicted under State ethics laws, Judge Jacob Walker, III, with advice from the State’s prosecution, gave him a split sentence of 4 years behind bars, with no “good time” or chance of parole, and 16 years probation.

There has been a cry of outrage over what is perceived as a light sentence for such a corrupt politician. But, this is actually a harsh sentence and a reasonable measure due to overcrowding in our State prison system. The State’s prosecution had recommended 5 years in prison and 12 years probation; very close to what Hubbard received.
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What Happens After Sentencing

June 20, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

MONTGOMERY—Michael G. Hubbard has been found guilty of 12 felony counts of public corruption, and he will be sentenced for those crimes on July 8, by Judge Jacob Walker, III. What happens after his sentencing has been a question often raised, after the most powerful man in Alabama politics was found guilty by a jury of his peers. Hubbard was found guilty of 12 separate Class B felonies. Each carries a 2 to 20 year sentence and a $30,000 fine.
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Guilty: The System Worked

June 13, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

Michael G. Hubbard, on Friday, June 10, the thirteenth day of his trial, was found guilty on twelve counts of public corruption. The system worked. In an era where government, law enforcement and the media are accused daily of ineptitude, negligence and bias, that is not a phrase often heard. But, in the State v. Hubbard it worked, just as the framers of our Republic intended.
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Hubbard Trial Day Twelve: Prosecution Stings Hubbard

June 10, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

OPELIKA—The State of Alabama v. Michael G. Hubbard, day twelve, marked the beginning of the end for the criminal trial that has been years in the making. It is tempting to use a multitude of adjectives to describe the most surreal day to date.

Suffice it to say, it was dramatic and bizarre.

The trial began with Lead Prosecutor, Matt Hart, cross examining Hubbard, using a proffer Hubbard signed in March, 2014. The Prosecution was able to impeach Hubbard on several points in his testimony before the court. During the trial, evidence showed Josh Blades had initiated the calls to help Bobby Abrams’ company with a much needed patent, and it was Blades who did most of the work…on State time. However, in 2014, Hubbard told Hart and others in a sworn statement, that only he had made calls concerning the patent.
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Hubbard Trial, Day Eleven: Hubbard Says, “Not Guilty” Hart Replies “Not So Fast”

June 9, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

OPELIKA—In the matter of the State of Alabama v. Michael G. Hubbard, the defendant, during testimony on day eleven, sought to convince the jury that all of the charges against him were false. It was simply a matter of misunderstanding or misrepresenting the facts by the Prosecution.

Hubbard said that every investment in Craftmaster Printers was made by a friend. Then he added, that the investment by Sterns Agee, an agreement, was “a loan document.” They were not friends, even though the firm was given the same investment terms as everyone else.
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Hubbard Trial Day 10: What The Jury Didn’t Hear

June 8, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Politcal Reporter

OPELIKA—In what one veteran attorney called a desperate move, Michael G. Hubbard took the stand in his own defense today, the tenth day of his criminal trial.

The day began with Hubbard’s attorney, Bill Baxley, continuing his cross examination of former Governor Bob Riley, who was trying to woo the jury with his “political” charm.

Under cross examination, Baxley attempted to solicit Riley’s thoughts on the Ethics Laws. That led to an immediate objection by Lead Prosecutor, Matt Hart, which Judge Jacob Walker, III, sustained. Again, Baxley asked Riley to give his opinion on the Ethic Laws, to which Hart objected again. This resulted in Judge Walker telling Baxley, that line of questioning was not going to be allowed, and that he should move on. Baxley ignored the Judge’s instruction and attempted a third bite at the apple. Hart objected, and said the State would ask for sanctions against Baxley, if he continued. This led to a contentious sidebar, during which Baxley could be heard pleading with the Judge, and Hart saying we handled this yesterday. Apparently, there had been a hearing, without the jury or press in attendance, in which Judge Walker disallowed any testimony from Riley about his interpretation of the Ethics Laws. Baxley moved on, questioning Riley about economic development issues. Once again, Hart objected, and the Judge told Baxley to try something else. Riley’s testimony ended with a whimper, not with a bang, as Baxley had planned.
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Summary of Charges Against Michael G. Hubbard

June 6, 2016

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

OPELIKA—In the matter of the State of Alabama v. Michael G. Hubbard: He is on trial for violating the State’s Ethics Laws. If convicted on any of the 23 felonies with which he is charged, Hubbard will be immediately removed from office. Each count carries a maximum sentence of 20 years in state prison plus up to $30,000 fines for each crime.

The following is summary of the charges against Hubbard:
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