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Governor Signs Leni’s Law

By Susan Britt
Alabama Political Reporter

MONTGOMERY—Yesterday, Governor Robert Bentley signed HB61, known as Leni’s Law, which will go into effect on June 1.
Leni’s Law decriminalizes the possession of medical marijuana oil.

The law was named after a 4-year-old girl suffering with severe epilepsy, whose parents were forced to move to Oregon so they could legally purchase cannabidiol oil (CBD).

Governor Bentley said, “As a physician, I believe it is extremely important to give patients with a chronic or debilitating disease the option to consider every possible option for treatment.”

Patients diagnosed with severe epilepsy can experience up to 100 or more seizures a month. CBD and related medications are designed to improve control of seizures. Studies conducted by UAB have shown a significant improvement in patients seizures and awareness after being treated with the drug.

Sponsored by Representative Mike Ball (R-Huntsville) and Paul Sanford (R-Huntsville), the bill is a follow up to Carly’s Law, which allowed the use of a marijuana-derived medication for the treatment of seizures. The first treatment was delivered in April of last year.

“With Leni’s Law, citizens in Alabama will have access to cannabidiol, that may help with treatment.  Through a study at UAB, we have seen the benefit of cannabidiol to help with chronic seizures. I hope we will be able to collect information that will determine the efficacy of this substance in other chronic debilitating diseases,” said Bentley.

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While the law does not legalize the sale of CBD oil within the State, it does allow purchase outside the State, without repercussion for possession within State borders.

 

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