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Jon Mason let go from State position as SERVE Alabama director

By Chip Brownlee
Alabama Political Reporter

MONTGOMERY — There are no more Masons in the Governor’s Office, at least not any related to Rebekah Mason.

On Tuesday, Gov. Kay Ivey accepted the resignation of Jon Mason, the director of SERVE Alabama who also happens to be the husband of Rebekah Mason. Rebekah had been embroiled in a spiraling sex scandal with former Gov. Robert Bentley, which ended with his resignation on Monday.

“The Governor’s been evaluating all of the staff members, all cabinet members and determining who will stay and who will go,” said Eileen Jones, Ivey’s new spokesperson. “Several members of the staff and cabinet have been asked to turn in letters of resignation. His has been accepted.”

Gov. Robert Bentley appointed Jon Mason as director of the Governor’s Office of Faith-Based and Volunteer Services in 2011, years before any alleged relationship between Rebekah Mason and the former Governor ever emerged. Mason’s position rendered him a salary of more than $90,000.

Both Rebekah and Jon Mason have come under fire from lawmakers and State officials after Rebekah and Bentley were accused of having an extramarital affair in March 2016. When the affair emerged, both Jon and Rebekah’s jobs with the State were scrutinized but only Rebekah left her post and her State paycheck.

Last year, there were questions surrounding apparent omissions and mistakes on Jon Mason’s campaign finance reports. His reports didn’t seem to balance exactly against State records.

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He later amended all three years to include being self-employed by JRM Enterprises and earning more than $10,000. He added Rebekah Caldwell Mason’s State employment, and her company, RCM Communications, showing her 2013 transition from State employment to private business.

It’s not clear how much Jon Mason knew about Rebekah Mason’s alleged affair with Bentley, but the pair traveled with the Bentley most recently to Donald Trump’s inauguration in January and attended Bentley’s State of the State address in February.

Ivey, fresh into her new job, is evaluating all appointed staff and cabinet positions within the Governor’s Office to determine who to keep on and who to let go, her spokesperson said Wednesday. That includes the high-profile positions of Alabama Law Enforcement Secretary and Medicaid Commissioner.

Turnover is not uncommon as a new Governor’s administration transitions in to replace the outgoing one. Jon Mason’s resignation is the only one to have been accepted thus far, but other resignations are expected later this week.


Email Chip Brownlee at [email protected] or follow him on Twitter.

Written By

Chip Brownlee is a former political reporter, online content manager and webmaster at the Alabama Political Reporter. He is now a reporter at The Trace, a non-profit newsroom covering guns in America.

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