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Testimony confirms Sen. Phil Williams lied about criminal investigation

Bill Britt

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In sworn testimony given by disgraced former Gov. Robert Bentley, he affirms that State Sen. Phil Williams, R-Rainbow City, was under investigation for possible ethics violations related to consulting contracts he attained after becoming a state senator, as first reported by Alabama Political Reporter in 2016.

After APR exposed Williams’ potential legal woes, he undertook a media blitz to deny APR‘s reporting. Along the way, Williams duped several news organizations into printing his false and outrageous claims which now are proven to be deliberate lies. Williams deceived al.com’s Paul Gattis,  Alabama Today’s Adam Powell and The Gadsden Times’ Lisa Savage and others into printing his defamatory and misleading statements about the state’s criminal investigation and APR.

During a six-hour deposition in the wrongful termination suit brought by former Alabama Law Enforcement Agency Secretary Spencer Collier,  Bentley recalls how Collier had informed him of the Williams criminal probe. Bentley also testifies that Williams came to him to discuss the investigation being carried out by Collier’s agents.

At the same time, Williams was seeking Bentley’s help, he was misleading the press and his colleagues about the investigation being conducted by ALEA with assistance from the Attorney General’s Special Prosecution Division led by Matt Hart.

The following is the transcript of Bentley’s testimony in which he is being questioned by Collier’s lawyer, Kenny Mendelsohn.

Q. Okay. Were you aware, not now but back in 2015-2016 before Spencer was fired, about an investigation of Senator Phil Williams?

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A. Spencer told me about that.

Q. Do you know what the accusations were?

A. Yes, I do.

Q. What were those?

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A. It has something to do with clients that he had secured. I think he had secured about 43 clients if I remember the correct number, and ALEA was investigating them probably at the request of Matt Hart, or it might have been some other reason. I don’t know.

Q. But you don’t know that it was Matt Hart, do you?

A. I don’t know for sure, but I think that we talked about that it was the Attorney General’s office that was working with Spencer.

Q. But the Attorney General’s office is fully capable of investigating crimes like that without ALEA?

MS. MAYS: Object to form.

A. Yes, but sometimes they don’t want to do it. They want somebody else to do it or do it in a different way.

Q. Do you know what the results of that investigation were?

A. I think that actually, Phil Williams knew about the investigation, and he was in my office at a certain time — I don’t remember the exact date, it was the early part of the year — and he told me that he had asked the Attorney General’s — not Attorney General, I’m sorry, ethics to investigate him, and he gave all the information to them, he said, and that they had cleared him.

Q. Did you have any other discussions with Phil Williams about the investigation of him?

A. It seemed like I did, but I can’t remember the exact date. But it wouldn’t be anything in detail.

Q. Did anybody else reach out to you about the investigation of Phil Williams, like any other senators, house members, anybody; anybody else contact you, outside of law enforcement, asking you about the Phil Williams incident?

A. I don’t remember that.

Q. What about David Standridge, do you know David?

A. I do know David.

Q. Did he ever meet with you about Phil Williams?

A. I don’t remember that.

The deposition makes clear that Collier informed then-Gov. Bentley about the Williams inquiry. Bentley also confirms Williams came to him about the investigation “in the early part of the year.”

Williams’ so-called consulting came to APR‘s attention in late December 2015, as part of its investigation into STARRS – the state’s much-flawed accounting system.

APR exposed the extent of Williams’ full list of clients on Jan. 4, 2016, showing that since becoming a senator, he had raked in contracts which, at a minimum, could total $146,000 to a maximum $265,000 per year, according to his report.

Senator Claims 43 Contracts are “Reoccurring Litigation Clients”

On Jan. 7, 2016, APR revealed that Williams was in fact a target in a criminal probe.

State Senator Under Investigation

However, on Jan. 11, 2016, The Gadsden Times, his hometown newspaper, reported, “He [Williams] said he has made a full inquiry at all levels of government and law enforcement and that revealed no evidence of any investigation.”

Despite his statements to The Gadsden Times, two days later, APR reported that State Law Enforcement had sent a letter to the State Ethics Commission confirming that Williams was under criminal investigation.

Law Enforcement Informs Ethics Commission Sen.Williams Under Criminal Investigation

Williams intervened with the Ethics Commission and would later boast that the commission cleared him of any wrong-doing.

Ethics Commission Executive Tom Albritton responded to APR‘s inquiry into the commissions roll in clearing Williams as Bentley suggested, saying, “We can’t investigate unless a complaint is filed with us and one was not filed with us.” said Albritton. “We CAN [his emphasis] self-generate one if 4 of our 5 commissioners vote to do that, but if they vote to self-generate, then they can’t sit in judgment of the Complaint,” he further explained. “The Alabama Supreme Court must appoint a special panel to hear the Complaint. The commission did not self-generate a complaint either.”

APR has requested any correspondence between the commission and Williams to substantiate his claim that the commission had cleared him.

Williams in 2016, told the Gadsden Times, “I took the unusual step of contacting the Alabama Ethics Commission on Friday and personally requested they conduct a full review of my law practice. At my own insistence, they have now received all five years of my client lists and will review them under seal.”

The case files into Williams’ alleged criminal activities was physically taken from Special Agent Jack Wilson by State Bureau of Investigations Director Gene Wiggins after Collier was fired. Those close to the investigation believe Bentley had the probe spiked to help Williams.

Firings Lead to Closing Criminal Cases

Williams is retiring from the Senate and still maintains his innocence.

Why Williams was never indicted remains an unanswered question for now, but finally his lies are exposed.

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Health

Last Conversations: Aunt Cheryl

“I just miss my Aunt Cheryl. If there’s anything I’ve learned from her loss, it’s that she is right. Everyone does need help from time to time.”

Kristen Bolden

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Photos of Kristen Bolden and her Aunt Cheryl. (CONTRIBUTED)

“Everyone needs help from time to time.” That was the last text my Aunt Cheryl sent to me on Saturday, May 16, 2020, at 9:36 a.m. She sent a few others over the next week or so to our various group texts, but that was her last message to me personally. It was in reference to me arguing over my grandparents insisting on helping me pay for a new car after my old one had been totaled the week before. I couldn’t let them do that, but as she was told, I helped my grandparents out a lot, and they wanted to help me too. 

She didn’t know then — just like I didn’t know then — that a little over a month later, she would die in a hospital in Shelby County after contracting COVID-19. She didn’t know that her simple message to just accept help from my family would push me to actually seek professional help a few months later and sign up for therapy again.

My aunt was a bright and funny person. The joke was that my mom had her sister’s kids on accident. My aunt and I were a lot alike. She called me her travel buddy and would take me to New York with her. Once we were lucky enough to stand next to a group of German firefighters while watching the St. Patrick’s Day parade. Our group pictures are some of my favorites, and the moment became one of her favorites to share. She sent me and a friend to New Zealand one year. For our last big trip, she took me to Gatlinburg for the first time and stood by ready to drive our group back to the cabin after an impromptu moonshine tasting. While she didn’t like her moonshine, she loved her Talladega County muscadine wine.

My aunt taught me the finer points of traveling and, honestly, about a lot of life things. Things my mom was probably ok with her teaching me — like how to use humor to be charming or having another good model for being a hard worker. There were also things my mom was probably not ok with her teaching me — like driving fast down a winding Highway 78 from Leeds to Prescott or how to say “I know” every time someone would tell me how cute I was as a kid. (It’s a thing I still accidentally do at nearly 31. Thanks, Aunt C.)

Ever the dog lover, there were five running around her house at one point. “That’s what I want,” I would think to myself. “Dogs everywhere. Some land. And next to my grandparents.”

The house with all the dogs is where she lived with her then-husband after she returned to Alabama. They moved there just as I was about to graduate high school in 2008. At that point, I knew we had a relationship when I was very young, then she moved around the States a lot, and we didn’t see much of her. The places I can most remember her are in Arizona (we visited her in Tucson and fed a squirrel at the Grand Canyon), Seattle (where she met Harrison Ford), Alaska (where she lived near a glacier) and Minneapolis (where it’s just real dang cold). When she moved back, that’s when our relationship really took off. 

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I went to the University of Alabama, her favorite and my rival. Luckily, it didn’t cause too many issues as Alabama has a very good football team and Auburn has a pretty good football team. One time my car broke down, so she and my mom drove down to Tuscaloosa from Pell City so I could use her car for a few days. I’d end up driving her old green Suzuki a lot over the next few years. 

When I moved for my first job in the summer of 2014, she and my grandmother helped me pack the Penske and drive north to Peoria, Illinois. I wasn’t prepared in any way, shape or form for said move, but she got me there regardless. When I moved back to Alabama eight months later for my second job, yep, you guessed it: She rolled up in the Jeep with my grandparents in tow, ready to move me back.

Over the next four years, we saw each other regularly. She got me in touch with a family friend whose house I was able to rent, just two or three minutes from my grandparents. My Aunt Cheryl helped me set up the place where I’d live, sleep, eat, cry, binge watch TV, play with my dog and jokingly make cereal as my potluck dish for any get-togethers we’d have. I was pretty hopeless in the kitchen at the time.

Holidays felt like my childhood days again, with everyone at my grandparents’ house, laughing, eating and opening presents, being generally loud and joyful. I worry about the holidays feeling empty this year and perhaps every year from now on.

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In December 2017, I was able to travel to New York City with her again. This time, I’d be a witness to her wedding in Central Park. She married her last (and best) husband John just outside of the Bethesda Fountain. It snowed the day before (also my 28th birthday) and was perfect for pictures. John’s younger daughter Tiffany was also a witness. I imagine we both cherish the photos from that day differently now. 

John and my aunt were fun to watch together. They laughed a lot, smiled all the time, in turn making everyone else happy. I think that was her goal in life. They had a lovely little place on Logan Martin we’d go visit every now and then. They’d take my grandparents fishing on the boat while I tanned and read books on the dock. I know being there full-time was actually her goal in life.

I moved to Boise, Idaho, for a new job in March 2019. It was pouring rain, but she and John and our friend were there to help me pack up, clean up and get on the road. By this point, she told me she was too old to move me again and drag all my stuff around the country, but she’d help me get started. Driving away to a new place without her or anyone of my family members in sight was the strangest feeling. 

She was an avid NASCAR fan, but one of her favorite stories to tell didn’t even involve the racetrack. For a time, she worked at Bass Pro Shops in Leeds where they often had drivers come in on Talladega race weekends and do autograph signings. One year, Tony Stewart — her absolute favorite — came in for a signing. I went with her, and as she liked to put it, he made small talk with me while haphazardly signing the picture for her without even looking up. She then further backed up this claim by sharing that on our dinner date at Guadalajara post-signing fiasco, our server handed her the receipt without even asking who was paying — another sign of me being a regular charmer.

I was happy to have her on my hype team, even if it wasn’t totally accurate. 

I scored four Talladega tickets and pit passes for the October 2017 race — mine and my mom’s driver’s last one. We said goodbye to Dale Jr. as my aunt and John walked around enjoying the sights and sounds. By this point, my aunt had moved on to Kyle Larson. I don’t remember where Junior or Kyle finished that race, but I remember having a good time seeing my loved ones enjoy the day.

When she passed, that’s the picture I changed my Facebook icon to in memory of that moment. 

My family members gathered together near the end of May to work on my grandparents’ floors. I Skyped in with them that day because they were all together, and I had nothing to do as my car had just been totaled a few days before. We laughed. We caught up. We cut up. It was the last time we were all “together.” Everyone had been taking precautions because of my grandparents’ ages and my aunt’s cancer.

Four days later, I pulled into my parking spot outside my duplex in my new car and got a text from my aunt. John had tested positive for COVID. She was supposed to quarantine away from him, but I feel like it was too late at that point. She was waiting to start treatment after being diagnosed with breast cancer in early March, followed by surgery a few weeks later. She told my mom and me she was going to be furious if she had to put it off because of COVID. 

My grandmother would also test positive. After a few weeks, she and John both recovered. Only a couple of days after my aunt texted us, she was running a fever and had body aches. She was on a BiPAP machine at Shelby Baptist in Alabaster. A day later, she was intubated. She’d spend three weeks on a ventilator, her condition going up and down every few days, with doctors and nurses and pulmonologists doing everything they could think of to save her.

My mom said she didn’t even look like herself because of all the IV fluid and illness, and we shouldn’t have to see it. I sometimes try to imagine it, but I can’t and don’t want to. 

The last time I saw her was December 2019 when I visited home for my birthday and Christmas. That’s how I want to remember her. With all of us and my grandmother’s giant Christmas tree. Laughing and catching up. Joking about how I probably have a line of people at my door, waiting to take me out on a date. 

She was taken off support and died at some point during the rain-delayed Talladega race on Monday, June 22. It’s so weird that the biggest personality in our family died during her favorite race at the biggest track in the NASCAR family. That’s a terrible analogy, but I think it would make her laugh.

When I posted my tribute on social media, the comments poured in from people she worked with all around the country, people she went to school with, people who knew her through others, dozens of comments talking about how shocking her death is. How funny she is. Her sweetness. Her sometimes brutal honesty. How they never expected this to happen to Cheryl. I would say “join the club,” but I don’t want them to go through this. Instead, I find comfort in their comments and that she was exactly who I thought she was — for better or for worse. I try to remember she was a tough lady who at one point drove an 18-wheeler. She could push through this, and so could I. 

After my mom first told our group chat how quickly my aunt’s condition was deteriorating, I asked if I should come home. Not a single person in our family would let it happen because it wasn’t safe to do so then, and five months later, it still isn’t safe. Instead, I would wait for daily updates around 9:30 a.m. while I was sitting at work. I’d get sick to my stomach after looking up at the clock to see it was nearly that time. I was 2,000 miles from home, unable to help, unable to do anything but sit at my desk before going home and lying in bed, hoping I would just go to sleep instead of staying awake and crying. I would “tweet thru the pain” as the kids say some nights, hoping someone would see it and know I was hurting. I was mostly doing fine living alone at that point, but from my aunt’s hospital admission to August, I’d never felt more alone in my entire life. 

I work in local television news so I’m used to working weird hours, spending holidays either alone or with fellow news orphans, and knowing I’m probably going to move at some point in the next few years. I’d already been terrified to move to Boise because I’m so used to worrying about my grandparents, but this was completely rattling. The stories I’d run in my newscasts about people being separated from family members or loved ones suffering from COVID, the stories I’d read online about people saying goodbye from miles and miles, even countries away from each other, were now about my life. 

Her service was held on Sunday, July 5, at Kilgroe Funeral Home in Leeds, the place next to the ever-changing restaurant on top of the hill I’d gone to to say goodbye to friends, family members and others I knew my entire life. Except this time, I couldn’t be there. I couldn’t give her a proper goodbye as she actually passed, and I couldn’t in the wake of her death. Instead, I walked my dog around the Boise State campus, stopping to cry on a bench or a set of stairs a couple of times when it all became too much. I didn’t care that I was in public. If someone had seen me and asked, I would’ve let them know what happened and told them to wear a mask. 

My aunt was cremated, another thing I still cannot wrap my head around. She and John’s dog Layla had to be put down earlier this year. Their ashes are now in his possession, something I’m grateful for as I know they’ll both be taken care of with love. 

I was able to go home the first week of October. I drove to Alabama from Idaho and back. I took every precaution. Nobody got sick. I was terrified for a month anyway.

It hurt so much to know I was there and I would see John, but I would not see her. The pain is apparent on everyone’s faces still, but there’s nothing to be done at this point. I spend time angry at people not taking measures to keep themselves or others safe, but I can’t stay angry forever and I’m mad about that too. 

I hate I can’t text her about a funny thing my dog did or that when I send a Christmas card, she won’t see it. If I do end up settling down, she won’t be there. Sometimes I think whoever I end up with might be lucky because they’ll skip her hazing, but I also know they would have loved her sense of humor. I hate that it’ll be the same way for my younger sister. I hate that my grandfather gets misty-eyed when he remembers her. I hate that my grandmother has to be so matter-of-fact about the loss of one of her children to accept it. I hate that my mother had to be the one to carry us all through it while losing her sister. 

In the end, I just miss my Aunt Cheryl. If there’s anything I’ve learned from her loss, it’s that she is right. Everyone does need help from time to time.

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Legislature

The Alabama Senate will be under new leadership in 2021

The caucus unanimously elected Sen. Greg Reed, R-Jasper, as the new pro tem. 

Josh Moon

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Alabama State Sen. Greg Reed, R-Jasper

The Alabama Senate will be under new leadership when the 2021 legislative session begins. 

Del Marsh, who has served as president pro tem of the senate since 2010, announced that he wouldn’t be seeking a leadership role during a Republican caucus vote held Monday. The caucus unanimously elected Sen. Greg Reed, R-Jasper, as the new pro tem. 

The caucus also selected Clay Scofield, R-Guntersville, as the new majority leader, a position Reed has held for the last several years. 

Marsh’s decision not to seek the leadership role wasn’t particularly surprising. Numerous ALGOP lawmakers have said privately over the last two years that Marsh has toyed with the idea of stepping down and handing the position to Reed. Marsh also announced last month that he won’t seek re-election to the Senate when his term ends in 2022, bringing to a close a 24-year tenure. 

In a particularly candid interview with his hometown newspaper, the Anniston Star, in October, Marsh indicated that he had grown tired of politics altogether due to the hyper-partisan climate and was unlikely to seek any public office. He also blamed President Donald Trump for helping to create a toxic climate. 

“I’ll be darned if I want to go up there and fight all of the time,” Marsh said in the Star interview. “I don’t know what it’s going to take to end the animosity. I blame [President] Trump for part of this. What happens on the national level — the fighting and name-calling — filters down to the state.”

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For Reed and Scofield, the moves up the ladder weren’t exactly speedy. They’ve each served in the senate since 2010, and Reed has served as majority leader since 2014.

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News

Poarch Creek Indians partners with Sweet Grown Alabama

The tribe’s support will be used to fund traditional and digital marketing to encourage buying local, according to the nonprofit’s press release. 

Eddie Burkhalter

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The Poarch Creek Indians have joined eight other organizations as founding members and supporters of the nonprofit Sweet Grown Alabama.

The Poarch Creek Indians have joined eight other organizations as founding members and supporters of the nonprofit Sweet Grown Alabama, which aims to help consumers find locally grown produce and products, the nonprofit announced Monday. 

“I am excited to announce our support of Sweet Grown Alabama,” said Stephanie Bryan, Tribal chair and CEO, in a statement. “We are always looking for ways to support Alabama’s economy and this important initiative will educate Alabamians about products that are grown and bred in our own backyards.”

The tribe’s support will be used to fund traditional and digital marketing to encourage buying local, according to the nonprofit’s press release. 

“This financial support from the Poarch Creek Indians will have a positive ripple effect on Alabama’s economy,” said Ellie Watson, Sweet Grown Alabama’s director, in a statement. “The Tribe has a strong reputation of community support and economic development, and we are incredibly grateful for their sponsorship of Sweet Grown Alabama at the highest level.”    

Other founding members and supporters of the nonprofit, which formed in September, are the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries, Alabama Farm Credit, Alabama Farmers Cooperative, Alfa Farmers, First South Farm Credit, PowerSouth Energy Cooperative, Alabama AG Credit and Alabama Association of RC&D Councils. 

To learn more about Sweet Grown Alabama or to find locally grown produce and products visit the nonprofit’s website here.

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Governor

Governor awards nearly $19.4 million in block grants for Alabama communities

The CDBG funds will be used to repair dangerous roads, provide safe water, build community and senior centers, improve sewer systems and more.

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(STOCK PHOTO)

More than 60 Alabama cities and counties will soon see improvements in their communities thanks to almost $19.4 million in Community Development Block Grants awarded by Gov. Kay Ivey. 

The CDBG funds will be used to repair dangerous roads, provide safe water, build community and senior centers, improve sewer systems and more.

“Community Development Block Grants help raise the living standards for thousands of Alabamians who may have struggled with dangerous roads, sewage backed up in their homes or find it difficult to wash clothes because of inadequate water pressure,” Ivey said. “I am pleased to award these grants and I must commend those local elected officials who recognized those struggles and responded to address needs in their communities.”

Grants are awarded on competitive basis in several categories including small city, large city, county, community enhancement, Black Belt and planning. Some cities received planning grants in addition to other competitive grants.

In most instances, awarded governments are required to allocate some local funds to projects as a match for the grants.

The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs is administering the grants from funds made available by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

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“Many local governments, particularly this year with the COVID-19 pandemic, often struggle for funds to provide basic services for residents,” ADECA Director Kenneth Boswell said. “ADECA is pleased to join Gov. Ivey in awarding these funds from the CDBG program, which enables governments to accomplish worthwhile projects to make their communities better places to live.”

Grants awarded and projects (grouped by geographical region) include:

North Alabama

  • Ardmore– $350,000 to replace sewer lines and ensure safe disposal of sewage.
  • Colbert County – $182,876 to raise the roadbed and improve drainage to eliminate pavement flooding on Gnat Pond Road, Cassie Davis Street and Marthaler Lane. 
  • Courtland– $350,000 to replace aging water lines and provide safe drinking water to residents.
  • Fort Payne– $450,000 to demolish and clear the abandoned Fort Payne General Hospital complex. 
  • Glencoe– $450,000 to replace sewer lines on East Air Depot Road, Taylor Road and Lonesome Bend Road.
  • Haleyville– $450,000 to upgrade sewer, water and streets in several areas of the city. 
  • Holly Pond– $250,000 to construct a new senior citizen center to help meet the needs of the growing program.
  • Limestone County – $301,000 to provide pavement and drainage improvements on Chapman Hollow Road south of the town of Lester. The project is designed to alleviate flooding.
  • Morgan County– $250,000 to upgrade and add an addition to the Falk Senior Center. 
  • North Courtland– $347,300 to improve drainage along Davis Street and other parts of the town.
  • Red Bay– $445,000 to improve sewer lines in the southeast part of the city. 
  • Sheffield– $210,000 to demolish and clear multiple dilapidated residential and commercial structures throughout the city.
  • Tuscumbia– $365,000 to raze and clear 23 dilapidated structures located throughout the city.
  • Vina – $348,650 to install a new boost pump at a water storage tank to improve water flow and pressure.
  • Winfield– $450,000 to improve drainage and upgrade streets to alleviate flooding along Regal Street. 

North Central Alabama

  • Blountsville– $250,000 to repair and resurface parts of College Street, Chestnut Street, Church Street and Ratliff Street. 
  • Chilton County– $350,000 to pave more than four miles of county roads including County Roads 127, 128 and 201
  • Cleburne County – $350,000 to extend public water services to 32 households along portions of County Roads 49, 689, 114 and 447. 
  • Columbiana– $450,000 to improve the city’s main sewer line to prevent sewage backup and related problems.  
  • Detroit– $350,000 to install new water lines and add fire hydrants to benefit more than 100 residents.
  • Talladega (city)- $250,000 to demolish and clear dilapidated structures at several locations throughout the city. 
  • Woodland– $350,000 to replace water lines at several locations throughout the town to improve water quality and flow.
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South Central Alabama

  • Boligee – $350,000 to improve the town’s sewer lines and manhole covers to ensure no infiltration into the lines from rain and other sources. 
  • Brantley– $350,000 to rehabilitate or replace sewer lines and other components of its sewer system. 
  • Brantley– $32,000 for a planning grant to help develop a land-use plan, subdivision regulations and zoning ordinances.
  • Demopolis– $450,000 to resurface portions of nine streets to include South Glover Street, McGee Street, Hilltop Circle, East Capitol Street, East Lyon Street, North Chestnut Avenue, North Cherry Avenue, North Ash Street, and North Front Avenue. 
  • Franklin– $32,000 for a planning grant designed to help the town develop future plans. 
  • Greene County -$350,000 to improve 4.5 miles of roads including Basketball Lane, Sandy Way, Smoke Lane, Brush Creek Circle, Curve Lane, Country Road Lane, Plum Lane, Star Lane and Jasmine Lane.
  • Linden– $350,000 to resurface and improve drainage on Easley Street, Adams Drive, Ford Street, Brandon Avenue, Barkley Street, Lucas Street, Gardner Street and Louisville Avenue/Pool Street. 
  • Livingston– $450,000 to replace sewer lines in the north-central part of the city. 
  • Pine Hill– $350,000 to rehabilitate two sewer system lift stations. 
  • Phenix City– $250,000 to fund a city-wide cleanup of multiple dilapidated structures. 
  • Selma– $450,000 to improve drainage along LL Anderson Avenue, Arsenal Place, Alabama Avenue and Mechanic Street, and Highland Avenue.
  • Selma– $40,000 for a planning grant to help the city develop a strategy to deal with dilapidated structures, housing and economic development. 
  • Sumter County– $250,000 to renovate the Sumter County E911 Call Center to streamline emergency operations. 
  • Union Springs – $450,000 to improve water, sewer and drainage along Bloomfield Street, April Street and Tye Avenue.
  • Uniontown– $250,000 to demolish and clear several dilapidated buildings in the town. 
  • York– $350,000 to upgrade sewer lines and rehabilitate sewer mains in the Grant City community. 

Southeast Alabama

  • Ariton – $250,000 to resurface and improve drainage along Dillard Street, Zumstein Avenue, Williams Street, Barnes Street and Claybank Street.
  • Ariton– $30,000 for a planning grant to help the town develop long-range plans and goals. 
  • Crenshaw County– $350,000 to repave Helicon Cross Road and Rising Star Road north of Petrey. 
  • Cottonwood– $350,000 to replace old and damaged sewer lines and a failing lift station.
  • Daleville – $292,500 to replace water lines along Culpepper Street, Wells Avenue, Ennis Street and Holman Street.
  • Dozier– $250,000 to improve water pressure and improve fire protection capability in an area along Main Street.
  • Eufaula– $450,000 to implement the fourth phase of its housing rehabilitation program. The program will be in the Edgewood subdivision area. 
  • Hartford– $350,000 to replace sewer lines and components in the vicinity of Third Avenue. 
  • Headland- $450,000 to rehabilitate up to 30 substandard houses in the central and north part of the city. 
  • Florala– $350,000 to continue to rehabilitate old and damaged sewer lines in a project that has been ongoing with CDBG funds since 2005.
  • New Brockton– $314,000 to renovate and upgrade three sewer pump stations to improve sewage collection. 
  • Ozark– $250,000 to resurface at least a portion of nine streets including Brown Drive, Lowery Road, Julian Street, Wilson Avenue, Hall Drive, McDonald Avenue, Woodview Avenue, Brookview Drive and Parkview Drive. 
  • Pike County – $350,000 to resurface County Road 7749 (McLure Town Road), northeast of Troy and pave County Road 2256 south of Troy.
  • Troy– $250,000 to renovate a portion of the historic Academy Street School and convert it to a community and cultural arts center.  

Southwest/Coastal Alabama

  • Beatrice– $350,000 to replace deteriorating water lines and add fire hydrants. 
  • Conecuh County – $350,000 to pave sections of 26 roads throughout the county.
  • East Brewton– $337,000 to rehabilitate sewer lines and pumping station in the southeast part of the city. 
  • Elberta– $350,000 to improve drainage along Baldwin County Road 83 (Main Street) to alleviate flooding.
  • Escambia County – $350,000 to replace and extend water lines and install fire hydrants in the Ridge Road community. 
  • Frisco City– $250,000 to resurface at least part of several streets including Harvestview Drive, Martin Luther King Jr. Street, School Street, Wiggins Avenue, and Wild Fork Road. 
  • Fulton– $350,000 to pave at least sections of Main Street, Eighth Street, First Street and Green Acres Road.
  • Jackson– $208,000 to improve drainage on Cemetery Road including adding curbs and gutters. 
  • Lisman– $350,000 to resurface parts of Commerce Street, Thomas Drive, Kinnon Heights/Circle, Broad Street, Tower Street, Coleman Circle and West Second Avenue.

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