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Roby tours tornado-ravaged Wetumpka

Brandon Moseley

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via Nicole Jones

Rep. Martha Roby, R-Alabama, said Friday her thoughts are with all those impacted by the tornado in Elmore County on Saturday.

“I was on the ground in Wetumpka yesterday to visit with residents and local leaders, and I assured them that my office stands ready to assist in whatever ways we are able,” Roby said. “As we await further details about the full scale of damages, I will be praying for those who have been hurt by this disaster.”

On Jan. 19, an EF-2 hit the city of Wetumpka in Elmore County inflicting significant damage. Almost miraculously, no lives were lost, and only minor injuries have been reported.

“The Monday following the tornado, I joined Gov. Kay Ivey and other local officials to spend time on the ground with those impacted,” Roby said. “I had the opportunity to see the devastation firsthand, and it was heartbreaking to say the least. The beautiful, historic First Presbyterian Church was destroyed, and First Baptist Church of Wetumpka sustained terrible damage. The Wetumpka Police Station, senior citizens center and recreation center were also lost in the tornado. More than 35 homes and dozens of businesses were damaged or destroyed. Wetumpka and its residents are in the midst of determining the extent of damages and planning for what needs to be rebuilt, and we must do our very best to help however possible.”

“I am deeply grateful to the local leaders and first responders who immediately jumped to action to begin securing the area and putting the pieces back together for the people who have lost so much,” Roby continued. “During this very challenging time, it has also been encouraging to see the community come together and begin the rebuilding process like a family. Mere hours after the storm, the Elmore County Emergency Management Agency heard from more than 1,000 individuals who signed up to volunteer their time and resources to the clean-up efforts. “

If anyone is local and personally interested in helping out with clean-up in downtown Wetumpka or in Elmore County, they can contact the Elmore County EMA by calling 334-567-6451.

The Elmore County Commission and city of Wetumpka are asking that volunteers please call ahead and follow instructions to ensure proper coordination in order to maximize recovery efforts and resources.

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Residents of Wetumpka or Elmore County who need non-emergency assistance related to the tornado should call 211 until further notice. Any emergency calls should still be directed to 911.

Economic developer Nicole Jones also toured the tornado-ravaged historic area and spoke with a representative from the Elmore County EMA, who stated they were thankful to have so much help from surrounding towns that they did not plan to take any additional volunteers that week.

“If you look for the blessing amidst the storm, I could not think of a better bicentennial moment than a community banding together for the common good,” Jones said.

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Call the Elmore County EMA with any damage reports.

“The family of First Presbyterian Church, Wetumpka wishes to thank everyone for the overwhelming expressions of love, care and concern for our congregation and historic sanctuary,” said Jonathan Yarboro, the pastor of First Presbyterian Church.

Moving forward the church will be worshipping on Sundays at the Wetumpka Depot with worship services beginning at 11 a.m. Salvage work on the sanctuary began on Monday, Jan. 28. They promised to reclaim all reasonable materials for reuse. This is a tedious process, but they wish to reuse all they can and to make everything they cannot use themselves available to interested parties in the community.

“Thank you again for your prayers and support,” Yarboro said. “Our historic sanctuary will be rebuilt as it was. The church at Bridge and Bridge will return as it has been since 1856. Be blessed and be a blessing.”

Since 1950, there have been 149 tornados in Alabama in the month of January. The worst month for tornados in Alabama is April with 493. March is second with 277, followed by November with 278. There are fewer Alabama tornados in the summer months with 73 in June, 74 in August and 76 in July.

2019-01-21 Post-Tornado Wetumpka Walking Tour

Brandon Moseley is a senior reporter with eight and a half years at Alabama Political Reporter. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Facebook. Brandon is a native of Moody, Alabama, a graduate of Auburn University, and a seventh generation Alabamian.

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Corruption

Former Barbour County sheriff arrested, charged with taking money from sheriff’s office

Upshaw was charged with two crimes connected to taking more than $85,000 from several accounts that belong to the sheriff’s office.

Eddie Burkhalter

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(STOCK PHOTO)

Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall on Tuesday announced the arrest of Leroy Davie Upshaw, the former sheriff of Barbour County, on charges that he used his office for personal gain. 

Upshaw, 49, surrendered to the Barbour County Sheriff’s Office on Monday and was released on bond, according to a Marshall’s office. He had served as sheriff until his term ended in January 2019. 

Upshaw was charged with two crimes connected to taking more than $85,000 from several accounts that belong to the sheriff’s office, Marshall’s office alleges. One charge alleges that he used his public office to receive personal financial gain and the other charge alleges that he used his office to obtain financial gain for members of his family. 

The Dothan Eagle reported in 2018 that Upshaw’s troubles began when the sheriff’s office was audited and cited for 11 errors, including one in which Upshaw gave himself the additional salary that had gone to the former work release administrator.

If convicted of the class B felony of using his office for personal gain, Upshaw could face up to 20 years in prison.

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Health

Governor: Alabama will get 1 million rapid antigen COVID-19 tests

The state is to receive the Abbott Laboratories BinaxNow rapid tests in phases over the next few months. The initial shipment is set to include approximately 96,000 tests. 

Eddie Burkhalter

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Abbott’s BinaxNOW™ COVID-19 Ag Card is highly portable, about the size of a credit card, and doesn’t require added equipment. (VIA ABBOTT)

Gov. Kay Ivey on Tuesday announced that the Trump administration is to send 1 million new rapid COVID-19 tests to Alabama, but the details on their use was still being worked out. 

Ivey’s office announced in a press release that the state is to receive the Abbott Laboratories BinaxNow rapid tests in phases over the next few months, and that the initial shipment is to be of approximately 96,000 tests. 

It was unclear Tuesday who will get the tests or whether the results will be required to be reported to The Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH), however. In a statement Ivey said while we await a vaccine “providing Alabamians – especially our students and vulnerable citizens – with this free resource will be another critical tool in the toolbox to combat COVID-19.”

Our Office is working in coordination with Public Health as we firm up plans for distribution. We are working to ensure students and high-risk individuals have access to this resource,” said Gina Maiola, Ivey’s press secretary, in a response to APR’s questions Tuesday. 

Questions to ADPH on Tuesday weren’t immediately responded to. 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Aug. 26 gave an emergency use authorization to Abbott laboratories for the rapid antigen tests, which is the first of its kind to require no lab equipment. 

The USDA on Sept. 18 reissued an emergency use declaration, changing wording to say that the tests are to be used “within the first seven days of the onset of symptoms” and that “testing facilities within the United States and its territories are required to report all results to the appropriate public health authorities.” 

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“Studies have shown that antigen levels in some patients who have been symptomatic for more than five days may drop below the limit of detection of the test. This may result in a negative test result, while a more sensitive test, such as RT-PCR, may return a positive result,” the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in guidance on the use of antigen tests

The Trump administration approved a $760 million contract with the company to produce about 150 million tests. 

“We’ll ship tens of millions of tests in September, ramping production to 50 million tests a month in October,” Abbott Laboratories said on the company’s website

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Other governors were making similar statements Tuesday about pending Abbott Laboratory tests coming to their states. 

President Donal Trump on Monday announced plans to ship 100 million of the tests to states based upon population. 

“Governors have the flexibility to use these tests as they deem fit, but we strongly encourage governors to utilize them in settings that are uniquely in need of rapid, low-tech, point-of- care tests, like opening and keeping open our K-through-12 schools; supporting critical infrastructure and first responders; responding to outbreak, specifically in certain demographics or locations; and screening of surveillance in congregate settings,” said Adm. Brett Giroir, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services official in charge of COVID-19 testing for the White House’s coronavirus task force, speaking with Trump from the Rose Garden on Monday. 

The Abbott Laboratories rapid antigen tests, which use a swab and a small card and can provide results within 15 minutes, have some similarities to existing antigen tests now being used across Alabama, which use small machines to provide quick results. 

ADPH has struggled at times to get results from those existing rapid antigen tests, which are often used in non-traditional lab settings, such as nursing homes, universities and urgent care clinics, some of which aren’t accustomed to ADPH’s reporting process. 

Dr. Karen Landers, an assistant state health officer for ADPH, told Kaiser Health News last week that she was concerned about the undercounting of antigen test results, and that some providers were struggling to submit results.

“We can’t afford to miss a case,” Landers told the news outlet.

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Health

Delayed reporting caused spike in Alabama’s daily COVID-19 count

Two large labs were improperly reporting COVID-19 testing data to the Alabama Department of Public Health, and a data dump from those labs resulted in the state’s largest single day spike in new daily cases on Sept. 25.

Eddie Burkhalter

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(STOCK PHOTO)

Two large labs were improperly reporting COVID-19 testing data to the Alabama Department of Public Health, and a data dump from those labs resulted in the state’s largest single day spike in new daily cases on Sept. 25 when 2,452 cases were reported. 

Alabama State Health Officer Dr. Scott Harris told APR on Tuesday that once those two labs sent in a mass of old test results electronically to ADPH — almost all of them point-of-care antigen tests — those results caused the spike in new daily cases. 

“ADPH continues to make all efforts possible to identify new labs and bring them into the electronic reporting process in order to capture the positive and negative labs for case investigation and data accuracy,” the department said in a statement regarding the recent data dump.

In addition to the large batch of backlogged positive antigen tests on Sept. 25, the state has also begun including probable tests — largely those positives from antigen tests — in both its statewide and county-by-county data, which APR uses to populate its charts. The state began reporting probable cases and deaths on the statewide level on May 30, and began including those totals in graphs on Sept. 1.

(APR GRAPHIC)

(Because ADPH has been reporting probable cases and deaths since May 30, APR was able to adjust our charts back to May 30 beginning Sept. 1 without the addition of the probable cases causing a huge spike.)

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On the county level, though, probable cases and deaths were not reported at all until Sept. 25, when the full total of every probable case was added to county charts. The addition of those probable cases made some counties appear to have even larger spikes than the statewide increase on Sept. 25, which was already the largest increase to date because of the backlogged positives from the labs improperly reporting positives.

(The addition of the new probable cases have also affected other measures APR calculates based on those cumulative and daily totals including seven-day averages, 14-day averages and percent positivity.)

For example, many counties over the past week have reported more positive cases than total tests, which would be impossible without the data delay and the addition of probable cases. Some counties, like Lee County and Tuscaloosa County, showed such large increases on Sept. 25 that their positive totals on that day alone appear to outmatch the statewide increase.

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That, again, is because the statewide total was already including probable cases beginning Sept. 1 and daily probable data was available back to May 30, but county level data did not include probable cases until Sept. 25.

Harris said it’s not uncommon for some labs to hold off reporting test results for a couple of weeks, then submit them all at once. Smaller commercial labs that don’t amass many tests often wait until a batch has been accumulated to submit. 

Two labs sent in a large batch of older negative test results to the state in August, which skewed charts that use that data to track new daily tests and percent positivity. A similar artificial dip and spike in statewide COVID-19 data in early June was the result of computer system problems.

Speaking on the current state of COVID-19 in Alabama, Harris said “we’re cautiously optimistic about where we are” and noted that unlike the spike in new cases, hospitalizations and deaths statewide after Memorial Day into July, the most recent Labor Day holiday does not seem to have resulted in larger numbers.

“We did not appreciate a big spike after Labor Day, which was very, very encouraging,” Harris said.

Harris noted that the state hasn’t imposed any new restrictions since May, other than the statewide mask order in mid-July, which was followed by a decline of new confirmed COVID-19 cases.

“I will say, we still have room to improve. The hospital numbers now are about half of where they were in early August,” Harris said. “Yet they’re still a lot higher than they were back in the spring, so I wish we would continue to see more improvement, but I think we’re definitely much better than we were a couple of months ago.”

Gov. Kay Ivey’s statewide mask order is set to expire Friday, but Ivey and Harris are expected to make an announcement about whether it will be extended. Harris said Ivey’s coronavirus task force is to have a conference call Tuesday afternoon and that an announcement would likely come soon.

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Education

The Price of Doing What’s Right

A man who was trying to do the right things, the honorable things, has been treated as the villain and punished as if he were the one violating rules and laws. And the system in place to stop such a thing has failed.

Josh Moon

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Photos of Mark Isley, right, with family and friends back "when life was good." (APR GRAPHIC/CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS)

On the phone, Mark Isley is in tears — his words barely understandable, coming out in short screeches. Isley’s tears are not really from sadness, and certainly not relief or joy. They are more a combination of worry, of anger and of teeth-gritting frustration. The kind of frustration that sucks you in and consumes your entire existence. The kind of frustration shared by a husband and wife, when some event — or some series of events, in the case of Mark Isley — has derailed your life, taken your perfect, peaceful existence and turned it upside down in a dumpster.

That is why Mark Isley is crying, and why his tears are justified. Because what’s happened to Isley is not fair.

In fact, it is the most wrong thing that can happen: A man who was trying to do the right things, the honorable things, has been treated as the villain and punished as if he were the one violating rules and laws. And the system in place to stop such a thing has failed, and the people who should stand up for him — or, at the very least, stand for the rule of law — have turned a blind eye and a deaf ear. Who wouldn’t be frustrated by that?

“It hurts you when a system and a group of people who you’ve put your trust in turns on you and fails to protect you,” Isley said. “I am hurt by what’s happened. Actually, I’m more than that — I’m devastated. My life has been ruined by what’s happened, and I haven’t done the first thing wrong. The system we have should protect people like me. Instead, it’s done the opposite.”

Isley, once upon a time in his life, was a school superintendent in Boaz. Then he was the director of human resources for the Limestone County school system. Today, he is unemployed — effectively blackballed within the public school system in this state — and only an investigation by the Alabama Department of Labor has provided him unemployment compensation and COBRA insurance, both of which were improperly (and possibly illegally) denied him.

All of this for the sins of not looking the other way. Not letting things go. Not letting the good ol’ boys run the show.

“Mark Isley doesn’t have a bad bone in his body,” said one of Isley’s former bosses, who asked not to be identified. “He’s as good as they come, and you can trust him to do the right thing, even if it’s not popular — even if it costs him his job and everything. That’s why he’s in this predicament, and it’s a damn shame.”

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THE TROUBLE IN BOAZ

To understand why Isley is unemployed currently, it’s probably best to start at the beginning, back when the craziness started in Boaz in 2015. Isley was in his third year as superintendent of the system and in his fifth year in Boaz. He and his wife Belinda were happy and content. They liked the town, had found a church home at First Baptist of Boaz and loved the kids and school system.

And the school system loved him. Isley was given a state award for innovation, received high marks from his teachers and was generally considered a very popular, hard-working and devoted superintendent. In interviews with local media the first couple of years after he was promoted to superintendent in 2012, Boaz school board members and other community leaders raved about Isley and the job he was doing.

Two things blew it all up: Isley said he caught his chief financial officer, Brian Bishop, missing dozens of days of work without taking proper leave time. Then a tape of a popular basketball coach, Anthony Clark, striking a player landed on his desk.

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Of course, it wasn’t simply those things that created the strife for Isley, because those things are not hard issues to deal with — not from a purely factual standpoint. The strife occurred when small-town life intervened in the personnel matters of a school system.

A bulk of the town attends the same church, First Baptist Boaz, and church activities are the primary source of social activities and business relationships. And when the CFO accused of stealing off days and the basketball coach accused of hitting a player are serving on the deacon board with the school board president and two more board members as members of the church — along with Isley — then, well, things that should be simple get really complicated.

That’s not to say that such personal relationships should complicate things, mind you, but just the same, they often do. And in Isley’s case, they seemed to matter a lot.

A bulk of the town attends the same church, First Baptist Boaz, and church activities are the primary source of social activities and business relationships. (VIA GOOGLE EARTH)

In emails obtained by APR, Isley repeatedly advises his school board president, Rick Thompson, that Bishop is missing numerous days and failing to report them. In one documented week, Isley writes to Thompson that Bishop has worked just one day of the five-day workweek, and yet, Bishop recorded zero absences.

In total, Isley provided the Boaz board — and also informed numerous people at the Alabama State Department of Education — with evidence that Bishop had missed more than a thousand days of work without taking a personal leave or sick day to account for the absences.

For his troubles, Isley was chastised by Thompson. In one email, Thompson told Isley that he doesn’t like that Isley is sharing information about Bishop with another board member, Tim Whitt, and he ordered Isley to “leave (Whitt) out of any discussions” concerning Bishop.

“There was no doubt whatsoever that (Bishop) was missing the days and that Mark was right about it,” said a former Boaz school board member, who asked not to be identified out of fear of retaliation. “But some people let their personal relationships cloud their judgment. That’s what it boils down to.”

Bishop ended up leaving Boaz for a different school system three months later, before a formal hearing occurred. Asked specifically about the allegations against Bishop and the numerous reports from Isley — all without any action taken against Bishop — ALSDE declined to comment.

Both Isley and Thompson were unhappy with how the entire situation played out, and the friction between the two only grew.

In December 2015, as he was still navigating the Bishop ordeal, Isley learned that there were allegations of physical abuse of a player against head basketball coach Anthony Clark — and that there was video evidence. After reviewing the video, Isley determined that Clark should be fired.

A source who has viewed the video, which was captured on a school security camera, told APR that Clark could be seen punching the player three times with a closed fist. The incident occurred at a practice and in front of other students. It also was not the first time that Clark had been accused of physically assaulting a player. But it was the first time an incident was caught on tape.

(Isley did not provide APR with any documents or materials concerning Boaz schools, and he declined to speak about the details of his departure or any other incidents related to his employment, honoring the terms of the non-disclosure agreement he signed as part of his settlement with Boaz.)

After reviewing the video, Isley wrote to Thompson to inform the board president of the allegations against Clark and to let him know that an investigation was underway. A few days later, Isley wrote Thompson again to inform him that after conducting the investigation, and hearing allegations that included inappropriate relationships with female students, Isley was planning to call an emergency board meeting to discuss Clark’s future at the school.

This set off a firestorm — both within the Boaz school system and around the town. Immediately, Isley received an email response from Thompson, who warned that “You do NOT have the votes to do this.” That email, and a later phone call with Thompson, was followed by a text message a few days later from Boaz First Baptist pastor Aaron Johnson.

In that message, Johnson seemingly warns Isley to stop the investigation into his deacon chairman, blames the whole situation on a few malcontents and indicates that his opinion of Isley could be lessened if things go the wrong way.

“(Clark) is a good man and is much loved and respected here at FBC,” Johnson wrote. “I hope my respect for each of you will not be changed by a handful of malcontents. I’m sure nobody has told you about the last coach who was a deacon here and the superintendent (who) fired him.”

Isley took the message as a clear threat, since the previous superintendent referenced by Johnson was forced out by the board after attempting to fire a popular high school coach. Johnson and church members inserted themselves into that situation, as well.

Johnson, however, insists the message carried no threat and was sent in an effort to help Isley avoid a potential problem by firing a popular coach and church member.

“I was just trying to head off a big fight in my church, in my town,” Johnson said in an interview last month. “I was also helping a friend. I would have done the same for Mark Isley. In fact, I thought I was helping Mark.”

With the church in the middle of it, and with Facebook messages and posts flying, Isley’s attempt to fire Clark became a civil war in Boaz. Isley said numerous church members came to his office and called — some with threats — and it turned what should have been an internal, simple matter into a crisis that would ultimately cost him his job.

Johnson, who began the interview with APR by calling Isley a “nut,” admitted that he pushed for his church members to stand up for Clark, but he denied encouraging anyone to go see Isley or to make threats. Later in the interview, he called Isley “a good man” and said he wished things had worked out differently.

Quite a few people in Boaz likely have that wish. The three FBC members on the school board — Rick Thompson, Rhonda Smith and Jeff Roberts — blocked Isley’s attempts to fire Clark in early 2016. But with Isley still pushing to place the coach on administrative leave, Clark resigned and accepted another job at Andalusia. In an email with board members, Thompson called Clark’s departure a “sad day.”

Four years later, a former school board member referred to Clark’s departure as “the day Boaz dodged a bullet.”

There are a lot of people in this town who owe Mark Isley an apology. He stood up and did the unpopular thing."

In September 2019, a female student from Andalusia filed a federal lawsuit against the Andalusia School Board and superintendent and high school principal, alleging that she had been the victim in a long term sexual relationship with Clark — a relationship that began when she was just 17 years old and a high school junior, the year after Clark left Boaz.

The lawsuit goes into explicit detail of Clark’s many, many sexual encounters with the minor, including encounters on school grounds and at Clark’s home. It alleged that school officials knew about the relationship but never reported it, and it alleges that the school board and others were aware of Clark’s long history of abuse and sexual assault of students at previous high schools.

“After that all came out, a lot of us found out some things we wish we had known a lot sooner,” said a former Boaz school board member, who also asked to remain anonymous. “There are a lot of people in this town who owe Mark Isley an apology. He stood up and did the unpopular thing and took a tremendous amount of grief for it from people who were supposed to be his friends. And I’m ashamed to say that I’m one of them.”

The revelations about Clark, who has not been charged by law enforcement, have not swayed Johnson, however. Asked if he regrets the way Isley was treated by him and his church members after learning of Clark’s past, the Andalusia allegations and about the video of Clark striking a player, Johnson said it didn’t change anything for him.

“I was trying to help a friend and nothing more,” he said. “I don’t have any power here. People just asked me for my support as a friend, and I made a few calls. Nothing more.”

The Clark incident, coming on the heels of the issues with Bishop’s leave, was the end for Isley’s tenure at Boaz. Isley’s relationship with Thompson was damaged beyond repair, according to two sources familiar with the situation. And then, things got weird.

With tensions high between Isley and Thompson following Clark’s departure, Isley and Boaz principal Gary Minnick selected Arab coach Justin Jonus to take over. Jonus seemed to be a popular choice — he lived in Boaz, was well known and well liked around town and was a member at First Baptist. According to three sources familiar with the process, Jonus was assured that the job was his.

However, shortly before the board meeting at which Jonus’s hire was going to be approved, Thompson showed board members an email between Isley and Jonus that allegedly showed Isley promising Jonus a massive salary, according to four people familiar with the situation. Those four people include two former board members, a longtime Boaz school administrator and a former ALSDE official who was familiar with the subsequent state investigation into the matter.

According to multiple sources, an investigation would later show that the email was a fake — or, to be more accurate, someone had gained access to Isley’s school email and changed the amount he was offering Jonus. A copy of the doctored email was then provided to Thompson just prior to the meeting.

“It was a flat-out setup,” said one of the sources. “This is not a secret at this point. It has been proven. The state did an investigation of this.”

An ALSDE spokesperson did not respond to my questions about this investigation.

However, the scheme got the desired results. The board voted 3-2 against hiring Jonus, who was in attendance and ready to shake hands. Following the meeting, Jonus stood, screamed “What!” and left.

A few weeks later, Isley would follow him. The board voted to buy out Isley’s recently-renewed contract — a decision that would cost the tiny school district more than $200,000 when it was all over. Isley’s tenure as Boaz superintendent, a position that he described as his dream job, was over.

Isley pleaded with officials at ALSDE to intervene, and provided numerous people with documentation for why he sought to terminate both Bishop and Clark. I asked an ALSDE spokesperson to explain why no one intervened in the matter or seemingly made an effort to address Isley’s concerns about both employees, and ALSDE again said the matters were part of an ongoing investigation and declined comment.

It would not be the last time Isley was left hanging.

After more than a year working as a professor at Alabama A&M University, Isley accepted a job in 2019 as human resource director at Limestone County Schools. (VIA GOOGLE EARTH)

THE TROUBLE IN LIMESTONE

After more than a year working as a professor at Alabama A&M University, Isley accepted a job in 2019 as human resource director at Limestone County Schools. In September 2019, Isley, along with then-superintendent Tom Sisk and another administrator, were called into an unannounced meeting with an FBI agent and an investigator from the U.S. Department of Education. Their focus: the system’s virtual schools and a lot of missing money.

For Isley, the questions they were asking made a lot of troubling pieces fall into place for him, and, he thought, it provided him an outlet to express concerns that had so far gone unaddressed by local and state officials. Isley had documented, and expressed repeated concerns to his bosses and state leadership, about a number of issues within the Limestone system, including troubling hiring practices at the virtual school, Alabama Connections.

Once the meeting was over at the school, Isley walked the two investigators out and chatted with them. Then he went to lunch with them, where, for more than two hours, he broke down his concerns, explained processes and agreed to provide the FBI and DOE with any information they needed.

“I didn’t tell them anything that I hadn’t already told people above me,” Isley said. “I’m sorry, but I’m not the person who will cover up things. If you do things the right way, you don’t have anything to worry about.”

This series of events led to my first contact with Isley — an email that showed up in my inbox and detailed how and why he was forced to resign as the H.R. director in Limestone County. Included among the reasons was the fact that he reported to ALSDE, the U.S. Department of Education and the FBI a number of problems within the district’s virtual schools and that he reported violations of federal laws to the state.

Isley’s interaction with FBI and DOE investigators was of particular interest to me, since I had been working for weeks to determine why the FBI was investigating virtual schools around the state. Back in June, the Athens City superintendent’s home was raided by FBI agents, and there were quick rumors that the raid involved the city’s virtual school.

I’m sorry, but I’m not the person who will cover up things. If you do things the right way, you don’t have anything to worry about.”

Isley also had other information and documentation of serious problems within the district’s virtual schools, including that the district was failing to follow individual education plans, known as IEPs, for learning disabled students and that the state’s largest virtual school was all but unmonitored by local school officials. Isley also provided information about improper hiring practices that were in violation of Americans With Disabilities Act guidelines, placing millions of dollars in federal money at risk. He also made claims of outright and shocking racism, including a school board member instructing him not to hire “any (n-word)” for principal positions.

(Isley made the same racism claim in a lawsuit against the school district, which he filed after he was placed on leave. The school board member, president Bret McGill, denied the claims. Isley told me, however, that he turned over to the FBI a recording of McGill making the comment.)

To prove his claims, Isley provided a series of emails to APR in which he asked a state department of education official to determine whether an improper hire had been made for an elementary arts teacher position. The official, Jayne Meyer, told Isley in a response that the specific teacher in question — whose name is obscured in the email — would be hired “out of field” because she lacked the proper education and experience combination required for the position. Such a hire is a violation of local board and state policy and could place the system in jeopardy of losing Title I funds.

To date, no one has provided any information to dispute Isley’s claims of improper hiring practices. No one at ALSDE disputed his claims or seemingly took any action to correct the hires or protect Isley.

Instead, ALSDE officials sat idly by as Isley was pushed out at Limestone County in a ruthless, callous forced resignation that came just after the start of the second semester last school year. Without reason, Isley was placed on administrative leave.

“If you want to know if Mark was right, just look at the way they forced him out in the middle of the year with no evidence,” said Isley’s attorney, Shane Sears. “I think that says everything. They couldn’t even give us a reason for placing him on leave. They just had to get him out of there and shut him up.”

Limestone attorneys argued in a letter to Isley’s attorney that school officials were not required to provide a reason. Instead, they wanted Isley to submit a statement explaining why he shouldn’t be placed on leave for an unknown cause. In addition to that, Limestone County officials apparently leaked the personnel move to the local media and issued statements indicating that Isley was the subject of an investigation.

There was, in fact, an investigation. But that investigation, conducted by interim superintendent Mike Owens, appears to have started after Isley was placed on leave. The investigation’s goal seems to have been to find any cause for which Isley could be placed on administrative leave and ultimately fired. Owens submitted a report to ALSDE to justify placing Isley on leave and for recommending his termination, a copy of which was obtained by APR.

The report showed every piece of evidence submitted by Owens was gathered after Isley was placed on leave.  And those allegations, well, they didn’t exactly rise to the level of fireable offenses.

They included a dispute between Isley and the owner of a thrift store over where he left Christmas decorations as donations; a complaint by a teacher from a year earlier that Isley didn’t properly address her complaints of being bullied by another teacher; an allegation that Isley didn’t attend a conference in Montgomery and provided different reasons for why, but ultimately used personal leave days to cover his absences; and a dispute over whether Isley properly recorded leave days — a dispute that was based entirely on incorrect information in a memo.

“I did nothing wrong, and I can prove that every allegation they’ve made was utter nonsense,” Isley said. “I am willing to sit in the town square in Athens and take a polygraph test about all of it. I have facts and evidence to support everything I’ve said and to prove them wrong on everything they’ve accused me of.”

It has not mattered in the least.

THE AFTERMATH

Now, months later, Isley is out of work and can’t get hired for positions he’s more than qualified to hold, because he keeps getting undercut during the hiring process. At least four times now, he’s been a step away from getting a job, only to have an apologetic superintendent call to say that their board has issues or the board got a call from someone.

Even when Isley turned to his friends and asked for help, the results have been the same.

“The guy’s been blackballed — it’s obvious,” said the executive director of an entity involved with Alabama public education. “I talked with two different superintendents and it never went anywhere, and they couldn’t give me good reasons why he wasn’t hired for jobs that he was qualified to get. It’s a real shame, because he’s a good man.”

Now, Isley is left in a position he never would have dreamed of a few years ago: unemployed, scraping by for money, trying to cash in favors to get interviews for jobs he should walk into — all while he’s a year away from being vested in the state retirement system.

The stress and embarrassment have taken a toll on Isley, and on his wife. And his tormentors continue to pile it on. Last month, he learned that Limestone County officials never submitted his unemployment paperwork to the Department of Labor, which prevented him from receiving unemployment compensation and COBRA insurance.

Last week, after Isley reached out to the governor’s office for help, a Department of Labor investigator called. Isley got thousands of dollars in back pay within days, and he said the investigator told him that Limestone officials have repeatedly refused to submit the required paperwork, potentially committing a felony.

Isley said he was told that an official investigation is underway and that his insurance has been restored.

I can’t sleep. I can’t eat. My life has been turned upside down. And I was right about everything."

That all provides at least some temporary relief for the Isleys, but it does little to address the larger problem — that an administrator who has never been accused of doing anything wrong, who has received awards for leadership and innovation, could be shoved out of jobs, humiliated and blackballed, as the State Department of Education looks on, for the sins of holding people accountable and doing the right things.

“They’ve completely and utterly broken me, which I think was their goal,” Isley said. “I can’t sleep. I can’t eat. My life has been turned upside down. And I was right about everything I did , and can prove it. But no one cares. They care about their politics and their friends and protecting images — not doing what’s right for the kids or following the law. If I can get one more year in the system, I’ll retire and move on, because I’ve learned that it’s not a place for people like me.”

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