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Jones backs Biden for president, sparking criticism from ALGOP

Chip Brownlee | The Trace

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Then-Senate candidate Doug Jones speaks at a rally with former Vice President Joe Biden in October 2017. (Chip Brownlee/APR)

Sen. Doug Jones, D-Alabama, quickly endorsed his longtime friend and former Vice President Joe Biden for president Thursday, just hours after Biden announced his plans to run for the Democratic Party nomination in 2020.

Jones said on Twitter Thursday he would be supporting Biden’s campaign.

Biden formally joined a crowded field of Democratic hopefuls Thursday, posting a video to his social media account announcing the campaign. Biden was quick to hit President Donald Trump for his response to the deadly clashes between white supremacists and counter-protestors in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017.

Biden said Trump’s comments about there being “very fine people” on both sides were what solidified his decision to run for president for the third time. He ran first in 1988 and again in 2008.

It’s long been reported that Biden was seriously considering running for the nomination, but he waited until more than 20 Democrats announced their intentions to run.

Regardless, it’s no surprise that Jones came out quickly in support of Biden. Two have a long history.

Biden and Jones first met nearly 43 years ago when Biden — then a first-term senator from Delaware — came to Alabama to speak at a law school, where Jones introduced him.

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Jones later went to work for Alabama U.S. Sen. Howell Heflin. While working for Heflin, Jones was assigned to the Judiciary Committee staff, where he worked hand-in-hand with Biden, the chairman of that committee.

When Biden first ran for president in 1988, Jones served as the co-chairman of his campaign in Alabama. When he ran again in 2008, Jones was a fundraiser and organizer for him in the South.

Biden later repaid the favor in 2017, when the former vice president became Jones’ most prominent supporter in the U.S. Senate special election that pitted Jones against former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore.

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“I promised Doug I would campaign for him or against him, whichever one would help him most,” Biden said jokingly in October 2017. “Doug possesses what an American political leader and the system need today.”

Now, Jones is returning the favor again — but to some backlash. Alabama Republican Party Chairwoman Terry Lathan criticized Jones for endorsing Biden.

“Sen. Jones and Vice President Biden are ‘two of a kind,'” Lathan said. “Both support bigger government, ObamaCare and abortion – all issues the majority of Alabamians oppose.”

Jones is also facing some criticism for an interview he gave to a Mother Jones, during which he said allegations of inappropriate conduct against Biden were distractions from Democrats’ goals of beating Trump.

Those allegations — claims that he touched 2014 Nevada lieutenant governor nominee Lucy Flores’ shoulders and kissed the back of her head before a campaign event — came just weeks before Biden officially launched his campaign.

A handful of other women have made similar claims. No one has alleged sexual misconduct.

“It’s not for others to judge,” Biden said. “It’s really for people who are the receiving end of that. They’re the ones who need the reassurance. This is another … interesting and important step in the movements we’re seeing across America.”

Jones went on to say that Biden has only appropriately addressed the allegations in part. But he defended him.

“I don’t think Joe Biden ever had the kind of intention you had in a kind of harassing or an assaulting kind of way,” Jones said.

Republicans seized on Jones’ comments, saying he was holding Biden to a different standard than Republicans who have been accused of sexual assault, including Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

“Sen. Jones clearly sidesteps the sexual harassment allegations against the former vice president saying people should ‘not be so judgemental,'” Lathan said. “This coming from the man who refused to vote for Brett Kavanaugh for Supreme Court Justice because of unproven allegations against him.”

Kavanaugh was accused of sexually assaulting Christine Blasey Ford, a California professor, when she was 15 and he was 17. She said he and a friend got her in a bedroom at a house party in Maryland when they were both in high school, pinned her on a bed and sexually assaulted her.

Jones ended up voting against Kavanaugh’s confirmation after Ford testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Kavanaugh denied the allegations in his own testimony and was eventually confirmed to the high court by a Republican majority in the Senate.

Jones faces his own tough re-election battle next year. Several Republicans have formally announced their campaigns or are seriously considering running for the GOP nomination to challenge Jones, among them U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne.

But a poll out last week found that Moore — Jones’ previous opponent — is currently leading in early polling for the GOP nomination.

The same polling firm found Jones to have a split approval rating, but that the majority of Alabamians would vote to replaced Jones in November 2020.

 

Chip Brownlee is a former political reporter, online content manager and webmaster at the Alabama Political Reporter. He is now a reporter at The Trace, a non-profit newsroom covering guns in America.

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Opinion | For Coach Tub, no thinking required

Joey Kennedy

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Republican Senate candidate Tommy Tuberville (TUBERVILLE CAMPAIGN)

Has Tommy Tuberville ever had an original thought? It doesn’t sound like it. Coach Tub basically spews Republican talking points and keeps his mouth firmly locked onto Donald Trump. He disrespects Alabama voters so much that he thinks that’s all he needs to do to win a place in the U.S. Senate.

Tuberville recently addressed the St. Clair County Republican Party at its September meeting. As reported by APR, Tuberville is quoted as saying the following, and I’ll offer a short rebuttal. I’m doing this because Tuberville is clearly afraid to death to debate his opponent, U.S. Sen. Doug Jones.

So here goes:

Tuberville: America is about capitalism, not socialism. I think we are going to decide which direction we are going to go in the next few years.”

Me: We decided which way we were going to go years ago, when the federal government started subsidies for oil and gas companies, farmers and other big industry and business. That, coach, is your so-called “socialism.”

I’m not necessarily opposed to subsidies to boost business, depending on the cause, but I’m not going to let a dimwitted, know-nothing, mediocre, former football coach pretend we don’t already have “socialism” in this country.  

What Tuberville really means is that he’s against “socialism” like Medicare or Medicaid or Social Security or food assistance or health insurance. He’s a millionaire already, so there’s no need for him have empathy for or support a safety net for people who are less fortunate socially and economically. That’s Tuberville’s “socialism,” and the Republican Party’s “socialism,” and Trump’s “socialism.

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That’s a cruel, mean perspective that would cast aside the great majority of Americans for the rich (Tuberville, Trump) and connected and, where Trump is concerned, the fawning.

Tuberville: “I am not a Common Core guy. I believe in regular math. We need to get back to teaching history.”

Me: I would love to ask Coach Tubby, one-on-one, exactly what he thinks “Common Core” is. I’ll guarantee you he can’t explain more than he already has. “I believe in regular math?” There is no other math. It’s math. Does he think there’s a math where 1+1=3? There isn’t one. There are a variety of ways to teach math, but there’s only math, not a “fake” math or a “Republican” math or a “Democratic” math or, God forbid, a “Socialist” math.

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And when Coach Tommy said, “We need to get back to teaching history,” one wonders if he’s ever been into a classroom. We know more than a few of his former players weren’t in many classrooms, if reports are correct. But they always played the game under his uninspired coaching.

Of course schools teach history.

The history Coach T. is talking about is Donald Trump’s “white” history, the one we’ve been teaching in our schools forever. Not real history; you know, the one where the United States was founded as a slave-holding nation, where Native Americans were massacred and starved by the hundreds of thousands, where white supremacy was codified within our laws, where any color but white was subjugated. That history. The history that is finally fading away, so we can really see where we’ve been as a nation—so we know where, as a nation, we need to go.

Tuberville: Tuberville said he supports following the Constitution and appointing a replacement for Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Friday.

Me: Well, of course he does. Tuberville doesn’t have an independent thought in his body, and Donnie told him this is what he’s supposed to think. The big question: How much will a Senator Tuberville be able to function as a member of a minority party in the Senate — with no Papa Trump in the White House to tell him what to do?

Both scenarios are real possibilities, if not likelihoods.

There is no question that Doug Jones is far more qualified than Tuberville. Jones can work across the aisle, which will be vitally important if Democrats take control of the Senate. Jones has his own thoughts, which sometimes go against the Democratic Party’s wishes. Jones is independent, smart and represents Alabama well.

Tuberville is a failed football coach who lives in Florida. That’s about it.

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President Donald Trump endorses Barry Moore for Congress

Brandon Moseley

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President Trump and Barry Moore (OFFICIAL WHITE HOUSE PHOTO/JOYCE N. BOGHOSIAN)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday endorsed Republican 2nd Congressional District candidate Barry Moore, sharing his endorsement on Twitter.

In the tweet, the president wrote, “Barry Moore (@RepBarryMoore) will be a terrific Congressman for Alabama! An early supporter of our #MAGA agenda, he is Strong on Jobs, Life, the Wall, Law & Order, and the Second Amendment. Barry has my Complete and Total Endorsement! #AL02”

Moore met with the president in the White House on Wednesday.

“I’m truly honored to be endorsed for Congress by President Donald J. Trump,” Moore said. “I have never regretted being the first elected official in America to endorse him for president in 2015, and I’m looking forward to working with him in the next Congress during his second term.”

“President Trump has already accomplished so much and kept so many of his campaign promises despite all that the establishment and the Democrats have done to obstruct him, but he knows there’s still lots to be done,” Moore continued. “We must contain and control the COVID pandemic, restore our economy to the pre-pandemic level of growth and prosperity we enjoyed during his first three years in office. We must restore and maintain law and order on our streets and in our cities. We must finish building the wall, and then fix our broken immigration system.”

“We had great meetings at the White House with the president’s domestic policy team,” Moore said. “Larry Kudlow, director of the National Economic Council, was also there. We discussed a new health care plan being introduced, economic recovery, trade with China and expansion of opportunity zones in depressed areas. The president has a bright vision for America.”

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“I’m convinced that Donald J. Trump is the president we need to lead us for the next four years, and I hope the people of Alabama’s 2nd District see fit to elect me to work with President Trump as their congressman on Nov. 3,” Moore concluded.

Moore served two terms in the Alabama House of Representatives from 2010 to 2018. Moore is a graduate of Auburn University, a veteran, a small business owner, husband and father.

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Moore is running for Alabama’s 2nd Congressional District in the Nov. 3 general election. Incumbent Congresswoman Martha Roby, R-Alabama, is not seeking another term. Moore faces Democratic candidate Phyllis Harvey-Hall.

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Jones introduces bill to encourage investments in minority-serving banks

“One of the biggest hurdles for minority entrepreneurs is access to capital,” Jones said.

Eddie Burkhalter

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U.S. Sen. Doug Jones

Alabama U.S. Sen. Doug Jones, D-Alabama, on Tuesday introduced legislation that would encourage investments in banks that serve minority communities.

“One of the biggest hurdles for minority entrepreneurs is access to capital,” Jones said in a statement. “That’s why this bill is so important. Increasing access to capital at the banks that serve minority communities will help expand financial opportunities for individuals and business owners in those communities.”

Jones, a member of the Senate Banking Committee, in April urged the Federal Reserve and the U.S. Treasury to support Community Development Financial Institutions and minority-owned banks disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and he threw his support behind more federal funding for small community banks, minority-owned banks and CDFIs during the recent Paycheck Protection Program replenishment.

According to a press release from Jones’s office, the bill would attract investments to those financial institutions by changing rules to allow “minority-owned banks, community banks with under $10 billion in deposits” and CDFIs to accept brokered deposits, or investments with high interest rates, thereby bolstering those institutions and encourage them to invest and lend in their communities.

It would also allow low-income and minority credit unions to access the National Credit Union Administration’s Community Development Revolving Loan Fund.

“Commonwealth National Bank would like to thank Senator Jones for his leadership in introducing the Minority Depository Institution and Community Bank Deposit Access Act. As a small Alabama home grown institution, this proposal will allow us to accept needed deposits without the current limitations that hinder our ability to better serve the historically underserved communities that our institutions were created to serve. We support your efforts and encourage you to keep fighting the good fight for all of America,” said Sidney King, president and CEO of Commonwealth National Bank, in a statement.

“The Minority Depository Institution and Community Bank Deposit Access Act is a welcomed first step in helping Minority Depository Institutions like our National Bankers Association member banks develop the kinds of national deposit networks that allow our institutions to compete for deposits with larger banks and to better meet the credit needs of the communities we serve. The National Bankers Association commends Senator Jones’ leadership on this issue, and we look forward to continuing to engage with him on the ultimate passage of this proposal,” said Kenneth Kelly, chairman of the National Bankers Association, in a statement.

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A recent report by the Brookings Institute highlighted problems minority-owned businesses had accessing federal COVID-19 relief aid from PPP loans. Researchers found that it took seven days longer for small businesses with paid employees in majority Black zip codes to receive PPP loans, compared to majority-white communities. That gap grew to three weeks for non-employer minority-owned small businesses, the report notes.

The report also states that while minority-owned small businesses, many of which are unbanked or under banked, get approximately 80 percent of their loans from financial technology companies and online lending companies, fintechs weren’t allowed under federal law to issue PPP loans until April 14.

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Tuberville campaign: Democrats’ criticism on Hurricane Sally was false

Brandon Moseley

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Republican Senate candidate Tommy Tuberville (TUBERVILLE CAMPAIGN)

Alabama Democratic Party executive Director Wade Perry last week released a statement criticizing GOP Senate nominee Tommy Tuberville for being silent on Hurricane Sally. In response, Tuberville’s campaign manager, Paul Shashy, slammed the ADP, saying that their statement was untrue.

Shashy pointed to a recording from a radio interview with Jack Campbell on 93.1 FM in Montgomery that Tuberville made the morning after Hurricane Sally.

“Before we go any farther I want to say this, our prayers go out to the people down south, because I am telling you, we don’t really understand what they are going through,” Tuberville said. “I went through a hurricane when I was down in Miami coaching. We went through Hurricane Andrew and it was devastating for months.”

“I have talked with some mayors there. I have called them. I actually just texted them,” Tuberville said. “They are real busy. I want to let them know that we are here for them. I would go down there and work if I could; but I probably would just be in the way.”

“People are now going in from the power companies, the National Guard these people going in checking houses that are flooded,” Tuberville continued. “I have got people down there whose homes are gone. They literally washed them out.”

“It was kind of like Michael a couple of years ago, the one that hit Panama City,” Tuberville said. “Right before it gets to the land it picked up speed. It went from a one to a two. The wind is a problem, but it is really the rain that gets you in a hurricane. They got a double punch from that.”

“People don’t realize this, but it really is the county commissioners who are really in charge, and they get it all going along with the mayors, and they also have an emergency person in charge who works along with the commission,” Tuberville explained. “This is not their first rodeo down there. They know what is coming. You can’t prevent it. You just hope people get out of harm’s way.”

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“There are actually more people killed after it,” Tuberville warned. “They get out too early. They try to do too much. They get on a roof and fall off. You have got to be careful.”

Hurricane Sally came ashore before dawn on Wednesday on Sept. 16 as a category two hurricane near Gulf Shores. FEMA and President Donald Trump have declared Baldwin, Escambia and Mobile Counties a disaster area.

Tuberville is a former college football coach, best known for his tenure as the Auburn University head coach. Tuberville also had stops as the head coach of Ole Miss, Texas Tech and Cincinnati as well as stops as defensive coordinator at Miami and Texas A&M.

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Tuberville is challenging incumbent Sen. Doug Jones, D-Alabama, in the Nov. 3 general election. Republicans are hopeful that Tuberville can unseat Jones, the only Democrat currently holding a statewide office in the state of Alabama.

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