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ASU celebrates 152nd birthday party

Brandon Moseley

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On Thursday, Alabama State University is celebrating the 152nd anniversary of it’s founding as well as Alabama’s Bicentennial year as a state with a ceremony, over 200 excited kids, and cake.

President Quinton Ross and others will speak at the event and that will be followed by music and the eating of the birthday cake. Ross is a former member of the Alabama State Senate.

The ASU family said in a statement: “Join us and over 200 excited first – 12th grade ASU SKYCAP kids as Alabama State University celebrates its 152nd Birthday Party and the State of Alabama’s Bicentennial Birthday during a brief, but celebratory ceremony, which will include ASU President Quinton T. Ross, Jr. offering opening remarks, other speakers, music, and some very “yummy” birthday refreshments. The big ASU 152nd Birthday & Alabama Bicentennial Bash will be held in the ASU Hardy Student Center in its second-floor Ballroom-C. Don’t miss out on the hundreds of delicious ASU birthday cupcakes decked out in the school colors, which will spell “ASU-152.”

The ceremony and festivities are open to all of the Hornets students and alumni as well as the University’s many family and friends in the general public, and the news media.

The guests include over 200 young people who represent ASU’s future, who are summer camp students in ASU’s SKYCAP program. They will be present and will be singing “Happy 152nd Birthday” to ASU and “Happy 200th Birthday” to the state of Alabama.

The event will begin at 11:30 a.m. and is expected to conclude at around noon. It will be at ASU’s Hardy Student Center in its second-floor Ballroom-C.

Thursday is the exact date of ASU’s founding in 1867 by nine freedmen, all former slaves, in Marion, Alabama. Joey Pinch, Thomas Speed, Nickolas Dale, James Childs, Thomas Lee, John Freeman, Nathan Levert, David Harris, and Alexander H. Curtis, made up the first Board of Trustees.

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Despite the tight economic conditions in post-Civil War Alabama, together they pooled $500 to establish the Lincoln Normal School to help educate the newly freed Black residents of Alabama. Today that historically black college and University is known as Alabama State University. They used that money to buy land and the American Missionary Association provided the money to build the first building.

In 1873 the state of Alabama took control and it was renamed the State Normal School and University for the Education of Colored Teachers and Students. It was renamed the Alabama State Lincoln Normal School and University (ASLNSU) in 1874. In 1887 it was moved to Montgomery and renamed the Normal School for Colored Students. It was funded by the state legislature for the first time in 1899.

Around that time William B. Patterson became the first Black faculty member. He became the first Black President in 1915. Under his leadership, it became a two-year junior college in 1920. It became a four-year university in 1929 and was renamed the State Teacher College, with the first four-year degrees in teacher education being awarded in 1931. In 1948 it was renamed as the Alabama State College for Negroes. In 1954 that was shortened to Alabama State College. In 1969 it was renamed Alabama State University.

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Since 1867, ASU has been dedicated to education, research, service and improving student’s learning and the greater community’s lives through its championing and defending the ideals and principals of education, intellectualism, justice, equality and fair-play for all people.
President Ross has also introduced to ASU an enhanced ideal of “CommUniversity” which is building bridges and reaching out to assist, educate, and enlighten the community, via the University.

Alabama State University is America’s oldest ‘state-sponsored’ liberal arts HBCU and it is an important member of the Montgomery/River Region/State community. At last estimate, ASU annually contributes over $900 million in revenue to the local and state economy.

A State of Alabama historical marker stands in front of ASU’s William Harper Councill Hall that notes that the birth of America’ s modern Civil Rights Movement took place in its basement mere hours after Rosa Parks arrest. It was there that the planning and organizing of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, led by ASU faculty members Jo Ann Robinson, Thelma Glass and other members of the Women’s Political Council, took place on December 1, 1955.

ASU family members and supporters will also have an opportunity to show their love for the University by donating it to honor Alabama State University’s 152-year-old legacy.
Individuals or businesses can donate by contacting The ASU Foundation at P.O. Box 271, Montgomery, AL 36101-0271. Interested parties may also call Jennifer Anderson, ASU’s director of Development, at 334-229-4950.

(Blackpast was consulted in the writing of this report.)

Brandon Moseley is a senior reporter with eight and a half years at Alabama Political Reporter. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Facebook. Brandon is a native of Moody, Alabama, a graduate of Auburn University, and a seventh generation Alabamian.

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Education

Brock Kelley appointed as interim president Lurleen B. Wallace Community College

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Chancellor Jimmy Baker announced Monday the appointment of Dr. Brock Kelley as interim president of Lurleen B. Wallace Community College. Kelley will serve in the role until a president is named at the completion of a presidential search. Kelley succeeds Dr. Chris Cox, who served as interim president since December 2019.

Kelley’s career is focused on education and workforce development. Most recently, he served as regional director of workforce development for the Alabama Community College System. Prior to his role with the ACCS, Kelley served as director of workforce development for the Alabama Department of Education.

“Throughout his career, Dr. Kelley has proven to be a dynamic and innovative leader committed to the success of the students he served,” Baker said. “Brock’s experience marries the worlds of academics and workforce development, which is a tremendous asset to Lurleen B. Wallace Community College.”

An Opp, Alabama, native and Lurleen B. Wallace Community College alum, Kelley began his career as a special education teacher at Enterprise High School in Enterprise. He later served as a behavior specialist for Enterprise City Schools and principal at Charles Henderson High School in Troy.

Kelley also serves as an adjunct professor for Troy University. Kelley earned an associate of science at Lurleen B. Wallace Community College in Andalusia, where he was a member of the Saints baseball team. He earned a bachelor of science in Collaboration (K-6) and a master of science in collaboration (6-12) from Troy University.

He completed the education administration endorsement at Auburn University-Montgomery and earned his Ph.D. in adult and continuing education from Auburn University.

“As an LBW graduate I know just how special this college is and have experienced firsthand the commitment of the faculty, staff, and administration,” Kelley said. “It is an honor to serve the Andalusia, Opp, Greenville, and Luverne communities in this capacity and I’m eager to hit the ground running to create the best possible experience for LBW’s students.”

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Kelley’s tenure at LBW will begin Oct. 1.

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Education

Governor announces the Alabama STEM Council

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Gov. Kay Ivey on Monday announced that she has signed Executive Order No. 721 establishing the Alabama STEM Council. The council will advise state leadership on ways to improve STEM-related education, career awareness and workforce development opportunities across the state.

“Alabama has continued to grow into an advanced manufacturing, aerospace engineering and cybertechnology center of excellence and as a result, the demand for qualified labor in these sectors has skyrocketed,” Ivey said. “The Alabama STEM Council will play a vital role in ensuring that our state’s future leaders have the opportunity to learn STEM-based skills that will help them transition into successful career pathways upon graduation.”

Science, technology, engineering and mathematics workers play a key role in the sustained growth and stability of Alabama’s economy. As companies continue to relocate or expand in Alabama, the state must develop an adept workforce that is prepared to adequately meet growing labor demands.

Ivey has appointed Dr. Neil Lamb, vice president for educational outreach at HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, as chairman of the council.

“Our great state is home to several quality STEM-focused education and workforce initiatives. However, we lack a common system to weave these initiatives together into a network that reaches all learners across the state and expands the workforce pipeline,” Lamb said. “Establishing a statewide Council was a key recommendation from the Governor’s Advisory Council on Excellence on STEM, and I am thrilled to see that recommendation become reality through the Alabama STEM Council.”

State Rep. Terri Collins, R-Decatur, who chairs the House Education Policy Committee, sponsored a bill in the 2020 Regular Legislative Session that sought to create the Alabama STEM Council as an independent state entity within the Alabama Department of Commerce. Although HB293 passed in the house with unanimous consent, it failed to advance in the Alabama Senate due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I’m extremely pleased the governor is taking the lead with the Executive Order to form the STEM Council,” Collins said. “Having the math and science experts from Alabama set high quality standards and guiding student growth in achievement will make a positive difference. Thank you, Governor Ivey, for prioritizing education!”

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Deputy Commerce Secretary Ed Castile, who also serves as the director of the Alabama Industrial Development Training Agency, has played a substantial role in the development of the council.

“The state of Alabama is rapidly evolving in science and technology with new job opportunities developing daily that require a STEM education as a basic foundation. So, STEM education is rapidly becoming the new ‘basic education’ that Alabama jobs require,” Castile said. “With new tech companies developing, manufacturing moving to digital ‘smart factories’ and numerous job opportunities that support these businesses, we must have a workforce that will meet the demands.  The STEM Council will be crucial in working with K-12 education as they develop their STEM programs to align with Community Colleges and Universities to assist students move along the STEM pathways needed by our developing businesses. We, in the Department of Commerce are excited to assist with administrative support of the STEM Council and will be a natural link to the business and commerce of our state.”

The council will hold an initial organizational meeting within 90 days after the issuance of this order.

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Members of the council include:

  • Dr. Neil Lamb, Vice President for Educational Outreach, HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology
  • Dr. Charles Nash, University of Alabama System
  • Terry Burkle, Baldwin County Education Foundation
  • Dawn Morrison, Alabama State Department of Education
  • Charisse Stokes, Montgomery Chamber of Commerce
  • Dr. Vicky Karolewics, President, Wallace State Community College
  • Sheila Holt, AMSTI Director, University of Alabama in Huntsville
  • Liz Huntley, Lightfoot, Franklin & White
  • RaSheda Workman, Stillman College
  • Dr. Eric Mackey, State Superintendent of Education
  • Dr. Barbara Cooper, Secretary, Alabama Department of Early Childhood Education
  • Jimmy Baker, Chancellor, Alabama Community College System
  • Dr. Jim Purcell, Executive Director, Alabama Commission on Higher Education
  • Fitzgerald Washington, Secretary, Alabama Department of Labor
  • Greg Canfield, Secretary, Alabama Department of Commerce
  • Tim McCartney, Chairman, Alabama Workforce Council
  • George Clark, President, Manufacture Alabama
  • Dr. Ken Tucker, President, University of West Alabama
  • Dr. Kathryn Lanier, STEM Education Outreach Director, Southern Research
  • Dr. Tina Miller-Way, Dauphin Island Sea Lab
  • Amy Templeton, President and CEO, McWane Science Center
  • Kay Taylor, Director of Education, U.S. Space and Rocket Center
  • Dr. Mary Lou Ewald, Director of Outreach, Auburn University College of Sciences and Mathematics
  • Paul Morin, Alabama SMART Foundation
  • Dr. Adreinne Starks, Founder and CEO, STREAM Innovations
  • Dr. Calvin Briggs, Founder and Director, Southern Center for Broadening Participation in STEM
  • Josh Laney, Director, Alabama Office of Apprenticeship
  • Keith Phillips, Executive Director, Alabama Technology Network
  • Jimmy Hull, Career and Technical Education Director, Alabama State Department of Education
  • Sean Stevens, Career Coach, Alabama State Department of Education
  • Tina Watts, Community Investor, The Boeing Company
  • Daryl Taylor, Vice President and General Manager, Airbus America 
  • K-Rob Thomas, Power Delivery General Manager, Alabama Power 
  • Dr. Lee Meadows, Associate Professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Dr. Tim Wick, Senior Associate Dean, School of Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Dr. Robin McGill, Director of Instruction, Alabama Commission on Higher Education
  • Elisabeth Davis, Assistant Superintendent of the Division of Teaching and Learning, Alabama State Board of Education
  • Dr. Jeff Gray, Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Alabama
  • Dr. Cynthia McCarty, District 6 Representative, Alabama State Board of Education
  • Dr. Andre Harrison, Vice President, Cognia
  • Brenda Terry, Executive Director, Alabama Mathematics, Science, Technology, and Engineering Coalition for Education
  • Tammy Dunn, Program Director, A+ Education Partnership

A copy of Executive Order No. 721 is available here.

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Education

Wide variance in educational attainment between counties

The top ten counties in Alabama for educational attainment are Madison, Shelby, Lee, Jefferson, Baldwin, Montgomery, Tuscaloosa, Autauga, Coffee and Elmore.

Brandon Moseley

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A recent analysis by the Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama shows a wide variance in educational attainment between Alabamians residing in different counties.

According to the PARCA research, across the state, 10 percent of Alabamians over the age of 25 have earned a master’s or higher-level degree. Sixteen percent of the adult population has just a bachelor’s degree. Just 9 percent of adult Alabamians have an associate’s degree.

Nearly 22 percent of Alabamians have attended college but did not earn a degree, and 31 percent of Alabamians have earned their high school diploma or GED but did not receive any education beyond that.

Ten percent of adult Alabamians have finished the ninth grade or higher but have not gotten a diploma or GED. Just 4 percent of Alabamians 25 or older dropped out of school without at least finishing the ninth grade.

At least 35 percent of Alabamians have at least an associate’s degree. By comparison, 20 percent of the adult population in Massachusetts has a master’s degree or above and 24 percent have at least bachelor’s degree. Factoring in the 8 percent with associate’s degrees, 52 percent of Massachusetts adults have some sort of degree versus just 35 percent of Alabamians.

Alabama is 44th in educational attainment. West Virginia is 51st with 30 percent — 22 percent with a 4 year degree or above. Georgia, largely due to the success of the HOPE scholarships, has 40 percent of the population with a degree two year or above. Mississippi is at 33 percent. The national average is 39.9 percent.

The PARCA study also breaks it down into county-by-county differences. The top ten counties in Alabama for educational attainment are Madison, Shelby, Lee, Jefferson, Baldwin, Montgomery, Tuscaloosa, Autauga, Coffee and Elmore.

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In Madison County, 8.1 percent of adults have an associate’s degree, 25.7 percent have earned at least a bachelor’s degree and 16 percent have a master’s or higher degree. More than 20 percent have some college but no degree, 20.8 have a high school diploma with no education above that, 5.9 percent finished the ninth grade and 2.9 percent dropped out in the ninth grade or earlier.

Nearly 50 percent of adults in Madison County older than age 25 have earned at least a two-year degree. Madison County is followed by Shelby County with 49.5 percent, Lee with 43.1 percent, Jefferson with 40.7 percent and Baldwin at 40.7 percent. These are the only five counties that are above the national average.

The bottom 10 counties for educational attainment are Wilcox, Bibb, Greene, Coosa, Cleburne, Bullock, Lawrence, Conecuh, Barbour and Washington. Wilcox is in 67th place for educational attainment and is also regularly one of the state leaders in its unemployment rate. Just 3.6 percent of adults in Wilcox County have a master’s degree or above, just 8.9 percent have completed their four-year degree and only 4.8 percent have even an associate’s degree. Just 17.3 percent of the adult population in Wilcox County has any sort of degree. That is 22.6 percentage points below the national average. Nearly 20 percent of adults in Wilcox County have attended college but did not finish, and 40.3 percent has a high school diploma or the equivalent but no college. More than 16.5 percent finished the ninth grade but did not get a diploma or GED. Nearly 10 percent did not finish the ninth grade.

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Educational attainment is a concern because the fastest growing professions generally require more education than simply a high school diploma. Gov. Kay Ivey is trying to increase the percent of the workforce with at least a two-year associate’s degree or the technical training equivalent of a two-year associate’s degree.

Many high-paying technology jobs require a two year or even a four-year degree or above. It is difficult for the state to recruit those sorts of employers to counties where the workforce is not competent to fill the positions. Those sorts of employers often have to recruit employees from far outside the county or even the state.

Even manufacturing jobs are increasingly high tech as new factories use more robotics and automation than the factories of the past. Today’s high-paying jobs require more knowledge, skill and technical competence than the factory jobs of the past.

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Education

Higher Ed Commission elects Dothan businessman, Huntsville CEO as chair and vice chair

Micah Danney

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Charles Buntin was elected chairman and Miranda Bouldin Frost was elected vice chair of the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, the commission announced on Friday.

Both have been members of the commission since 2015.

“As the coordinating board for public higher education in Alabama, I pledge to continue to work with our institutions throughout this pandemic to maintain the highest level of excellence for Alabama’s students,” Buntin said. “Earlier this year, our colleges and universities proved their resilience to a changing work environment by successfully transitioning to online learning.”

Buntin is a shareholder and realtor with Tom West Company in Dothan. He graduated from Leadership Alabama in 2013, is a current member of the Houston County-Dothan Rotary Club and is a former chairman of the Dothan Area Chamber of Commerce.

Bouldin Frost is president and CEO of LogiCore Corp. in Huntsville, a company that provides Systems Engineering and Technical Assistance (SETA) services to U.S. Department of Defense agencies.

She is a member of the Greater Huntsville Rotary Club and a board member of the Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce.

The commission faces steep challenges. State funding had been increasing to help institutions recover from the 2008 recession before the coronavirus pandemic hit. Now institutional enrollments, budgets, auxiliary revenue and the health of employees and students are simultaneously at risk.

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“The dedication to student success shown by Chairman Buntin and Vice Chair Bouldin Frost will guide their decision making as the higher education community navigates the current COVID crisis and its impact on Alabama’s universities and community colleges,” said Jim Purcell, executive director of the ACHE.

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