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Sessions says impeachment inquiry “is a desperate attempt to weaken a president”

United States Attorney General Jeff Sessions delivers remarks during the 30th Annual Candlelight Vigil to memorialize fallen officers on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., May 13, 2018. U.S. Customs and Border Protection Photo by Glenn Fawcett

Former Attorney General and current Senate candidate Jeff Sessions wrote an editorial last week for Fox News in which he compared the impeachment inquiry to show trials in the old Soviet Union and charged that the effort is “a desperate attempt to weaken a president.”

Sessions said, “Our founders did not provide the awesome impeachment power as a tool to remove a duly elected president because of a political disagreement. President Trump has not been accused of anything for which he can be credibly impeached, but the dangerous ideology of the far left does not recognize legal limits or fundamental fairness.”

“The president’s opponents are determined to win at all costs to undo the results of the last election and to manipulate the results of the next one,” Sessions said. “That is why – regardless of the weakness of the case presented – the conclusion of the Democratic-controlled House of Representatives seems predetermined.”

“The old Soviet Union was famous for show trials – fake trials where the result was already understood, where everything was just for show, and where the accused was already certain to be found guilty before the case was even presented,” Sessions stated.

“This is political theater, a desperate attempt to weaken a president who has deeply offended the powers that be in Washington.” Sessions stated.

Many Republicans have stated similar opinions of the impeachment case against the President.

Former State Representative and Trump Victory National Finance Committee member Perry O. Hooper Jr. attended the first days of the public impeachment inquiry.

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Hooper told the Alabama Political Reporter that the first two days of the impeachment hearings were, “A joke.”

“It’s is a gigantic waste of the taxpayers’ money,” Hooper told APR. “The first day was about what he said, she said! There were no facts, no evidence but 100 percent hearsay.”

“All day today it’s been about this Ambassador who got fired,” Hooper added. “Bottom line is that the President has done nothing wrong and the Democrats do nothing; but waste the taxpayers’ dollars when they should be passing the budget, funding the wall, passing meaningful healthcare reform and passing the President’s infrastructure plan.”

Sessions is desperate to convince Republican primary voters that they can count on him to support the president and the president’s agenda if he is re-elected to the Senate.

Sessions was first elected to the Senate in 1996. He was re-elected in 2002, 2008, and 2014. In 2014, Sessions was so popular in Alabama that no one (Republican or Democrat) would run against him. This election is very different. Pres. Trump was very critical of Sessions’ performance as Attorney General. His failure to stop the Robert Mueller special counsel investigation angered many of Alabama’s Republican voters. Sessions will need to work hard to repair those relationships.

The primary is March 3.

The winner of the Republican primary will face Doug Jones in the Nov. 3 general election.

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Brandon Moseley
Written By

Brandon Moseley is a senior reporter with over nine years at Alabama Political Reporter. During that time he has written 8,297 articles for APR. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Facebook. Brandon is a native of Moody, Alabama, a graduate of Auburn University, and a seventh generation Alabamian.

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