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Elections

2nd Congressional District GOP candidates appeal to Elmore County voters

Brandon Moseley

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January 14 the Second Congressional District Republican candidates spoke to the Elmore County Republican voters at a forum in Wetumpka.

Dothan businessman Jeff Coleman said, “I am a 35-year businessman,” not a professional politician.

“A couple who prays together stays together.” Coleman said discussing his successful marriage.

“A good quality job will solve all the problems in America,” Coleman added.

Coleman promised to do everything he could to protect Maxwell Air Force Base and Fort Rucker Army base as well as to do everything possible to protect agriculture and Alabama farmers.

Bob Rogers said, “I would also make sure that our military bases would be adequately funded.”

Rogers promised to work to help veterans, farmers, peanut farmers, and to work with the Forestry Commission.

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Rogers said that he worked in education as a teacher, following a 30-year career in law enforcement.

Prattville businesswoman Jessica Taylor said, “I have had enough of AOC and her squad brainwashing the young people of this country.”

Taylor said that her husband, Bryan Taylor, currently serves in Army National Guard.

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Taylor said that he business for the last two years has been helping entities with grant funding

“I know exactly where we need to cut things; so I will hit the ground running on Day one,” Taylor added.

Former Attorney General Troy King said, “I am fed up with what is going on in our country.”

“Everything we believe in Washington is against,” King said. “They took my brick away from me I threw at TVs.” I now have a foam brick.

“I have a record of standing up and fighting and not cut and running,” King said describing himself as “a fighter.”

Former State Representative Barry Moore of Enterprise said that he ran in 2010 for the state legislature and was part of the first Republican majority in the legislature in 135 years and in 2014 became the Chairman of veteran and military affairs committee.

“My daughter is the youngest Trump delegate in the country,” Moore said. She married an Army Ranger this weekend.”

“I am a fiscal conservative, a strong conservative,” Coleman said. “We have been over-regulated as an economy.”

“For every regulation put on you need to take two off,” Coleman added. “I think we need lower taxes and lower regulation.”

Coleman said that President Trump was right to implement policies to grow the economy. “Get rid of all the regulations that our businesses are forced with today.”

“I am a fiscal conservative,” Rogers said. I favor submitting legislation that would cut the cost of government 25 percent.”

Rogers admitted thought, “That may be hard to do.”

Rogers said that he supported Trump’s efforts on “Getting China in line and taxing the goods coming in from Mexico and China.”

“I am very much a fiscal conservative,” Taylor said.

Taylor said that she was for cutting the to fraud, waste and abuse.

“$150 billion a year is going to fraud waste and abuse in Medicare alone,”

Taylor said that she has seen the ways to cut government from her working in writing grant applications.

“I have signed a no new taxes pledge,” Taylor added.

“We need government off of our backs and out of our pocket book,” King said.

King said that the Department of Education has accomplished nothing and should be abolished and that money sent back to the states to educate kids.

“More people work at the Department of Agriculture than there are farmers in this country,” King added.

King said that the government had spent over $one billion to convert a mental hospital in to the new Homeland Security headquarters.

Moore said that when he was in the Alabama legislature they cut a $billion in spending. “I voted to cut our pay.”

“I was the first to endorse Trump,” Moore said.

“Get the taxes and regulations out of the way and we won’t need the subsidies,” Moore added.

Rogers said, “The Republican Party, we’re going through a transition.”\

Rogers cited the work of Candace Owens. “I see this growing. I think we are seeing a lot of the racial tension behind us.”

Taylor said, “I would love to serve on the Armed Services Committee.”

“One of the biggest issues facing this country as a whole is socialism,” Taylor said. “Seventy percent of millennials say that they would vote for a socialist and 1 in 3 would support communism. This is the number one danger facing this country.”

“The greatest issue is that the Democrats in Washington want to remove our President,” King said. “We need a House that will defend the President and will not let things get out of hand and make sure that his policies move forwards.

“I have shown in my history that I will fight,” Moore said. “We have got to show up in the census.”

Coleman said, “The Largest employer in this district is Maxwell Gunter and Fort Rucker.”

“I am for free and fair trade.” Coleman sold. “We have got to do everything we can to help our farmers get through this.”

“I am a businessman, not a politician,” Coleman said. “I have never run for elected office before.” “I don’t need this job I want this job.”

“I would back President Trump 100 percent on his policies,” Rogers said.

Rogers supported a universal voter ID card across the country and federalizing the National Guard “To make sure that we have fair voting. If they are not citizens they do not have a vote in this land.:

“I am the best person to represent us,” Taylor said. “I was not born into a trust fund; I was born into a trailer park.”

Taylor said that she was active with Big Sisters, served as President of the River Region Pregnancy Center and was endorsed by the Susan B Anthony List.

“We don’t have a gun problem in this country; we have a mental health problem,” Taylor added. “We recently launched a conservative squad on Fox and Friends.”

“Anybody can tell you that they are pro-life and pro-gun; but I have walked the walk and talked the talk,” King said referencing his championing of legislation making it a crime to kill the unborn child as well as the mom. “Two crimes and can be prosecuted for both of them.”

“We need someone who goes to Washington who knows what they are doing,” King said. “Send a message to Washington that we are sick and tired of what they are doing and we are coming to change that.”

Moore said that he was the most dependable conservative voter when he was a member of the legislature.

Moore said, “I built my business from the ground up, driving a garbage truck.”

“I am an Ag science guy, a veteran, a dependable conservative and a Trump delegate,” Moore said. One of his friends told him, “Barry you are the Second District.”

The Republican primary will be on March 3.

Brandon Moseley is a senior reporter with eight and a half years at Alabama Political Reporter. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Facebook. Brandon is a native of Moody, Alabama, a graduate of Auburn University, and a seventh generation Alabamian.

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Elections

Jones introduces bill to encourage investments in minority-serving banks

“One of the biggest hurdles for minority entrepreneurs is access to capital,” Jones said.

Eddie Burkhalter

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U.S. Sen. Doug Jones

Alabama U.S. Sen. Doug Jones, D-Alabama, on Tuesday introduced legislation that would encourage investments in banks that serve minority communities.

“One of the biggest hurdles for minority entrepreneurs is access to capital,” Jones said in a statement. “That’s why this bill is so important. Increasing access to capital at the banks that serve minority communities will help expand financial opportunities for individuals and business owners in those communities.”

Jones, a member of the Senate Banking Committee, in April urged the Federal Reserve and the U.S. Treasury to support Community Development Financial Institutions and minority-owned banks disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and he threw his support behind more federal funding for small community banks, minority-owned banks and CDFIs during the recent Paycheck Protection Program replenishment.

According to a press release from Jones’s office, the bill would attract investments to those financial institutions by changing rules to allow “minority-owned banks, community banks with under $10 billion in deposits” and CDFIs to accept brokered deposits, or investments with high interest rates, thereby bolstering those institutions and encourage them to invest and lend in their communities.

It would also allow low-income and minority credit unions to access the National Credit Union Administration’s Community Development Revolving Loan Fund.

“Commonwealth National Bank would like to thank Senator Jones for his leadership in introducing the Minority Depository Institution and Community Bank Deposit Access Act. As a small Alabama home grown institution, this proposal will allow us to accept needed deposits without the current limitations that hinder our ability to better serve the historically underserved communities that our institutions were created to serve. We support your efforts and encourage you to keep fighting the good fight for all of America,” said Sidney King, president and CEO of Commonwealth National Bank, in a statement.

“The Minority Depository Institution and Community Bank Deposit Access Act is a welcomed first step in helping Minority Depository Institutions like our National Bankers Association member banks develop the kinds of national deposit networks that allow our institutions to compete for deposits with larger banks and to better meet the credit needs of the communities we serve. The National Bankers Association commends Senator Jones’ leadership on this issue, and we look forward to continuing to engage with him on the ultimate passage of this proposal,” said Kenneth Kelly, chairman of the National Bankers Association, in a statement.

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A recent report by the Brookings Institute highlighted problems minority-owned businesses had accessing federal COVID-19 relief aid from PPP loans. Researchers found that it took seven days longer for small businesses with paid employees in majority Black zip codes to receive PPP loans, compared to majority-white communities. That gap grew to three weeks for non-employer minority-owned small businesses, the report notes.

The report also states that while minority-owned small businesses, many of which are unbanked or under banked, get approximately 80 percent of their loans from financial technology companies and online lending companies, fintechs weren’t allowed under federal law to issue PPP loans until April 14.

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Tuberville campaign: Democrats’ criticism on Hurricane Sally was false

Brandon Moseley

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Republican Senate candidate Tommy Tuberville (TUBERVILLE CAMPAIGN)

Alabama Democratic Party executive Director Wade Perry last week released a statement criticizing GOP Senate nominee Tommy Tuberville for being silent on Hurricane Sally. In response, Tuberville’s campaign manager, Paul Shashy, slammed the ADP, saying that their statement was untrue.

Shashy pointed to a recording from a radio interview with Jack Campbell on 93.1 FM in Montgomery that Tuberville made the morning after Hurricane Sally.

“Before we go any farther I want to say this, our prayers go out to the people down south, because I am telling you, we don’t really understand what they are going through,” Tuberville said. “I went through a hurricane when I was down in Miami coaching. We went through Hurricane Andrew and it was devastating for months.”

“I have talked with some mayors there. I have called them. I actually just texted them,” Tuberville said. “They are real busy. I want to let them know that we are here for them. I would go down there and work if I could; but I probably would just be in the way.”

“People are now going in from the power companies, the National Guard these people going in checking houses that are flooded,” Tuberville continued. “I have got people down there whose homes are gone. They literally washed them out.”

“It was kind of like Michael a couple of years ago, the one that hit Panama City,” Tuberville said. “Right before it gets to the land it picked up speed. It went from a one to a two. The wind is a problem, but it is really the rain that gets you in a hurricane. They got a double punch from that.”

“People don’t realize this, but it really is the county commissioners who are really in charge, and they get it all going along with the mayors, and they also have an emergency person in charge who works along with the commission,” Tuberville explained. “This is not their first rodeo down there. They know what is coming. You can’t prevent it. You just hope people get out of harm’s way.”

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“There are actually more people killed after it,” Tuberville warned. “They get out too early. They try to do too much. They get on a roof and fall off. You have got to be careful.”

Hurricane Sally came ashore before dawn on Wednesday on Sept. 16 as a category two hurricane near Gulf Shores. FEMA and President Donald Trump have declared Baldwin, Escambia and Mobile Counties a disaster area.

Tuberville is a former college football coach, best known for his tenure as the Auburn University head coach. Tuberville also had stops as the head coach of Ole Miss, Texas Tech and Cincinnati as well as stops as defensive coordinator at Miami and Texas A&M.

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Tuberville is challenging incumbent Sen. Doug Jones, D-Alabama, in the Nov. 3 general election. Republicans are hopeful that Tuberville can unseat Jones, the only Democrat currently holding a statewide office in the state of Alabama.

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Tuberville: Election is about Americanism against anti-Americanism

Brandon Moseley

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Republican Senate candidate Tommy Tuberville (TUBERVILLE CAMPAIGN)

Republican Senate candidate Tommy Tuberville said Tuesday that this election is about what he views as Americanism versus anti-Americanism. Tuberville’s comments were made to the influential St. Clair County Republican Party at their September meeting in Pell City.

“America is about capitalism, not socialism,” Tuberville said. “I think we are going to decide which direction we are going to go in the next few years.”

Tuberville claimed that schools have not been educating children but have instead become about indoctrination.

“Everybody needs an education,” Tuberville said. “But not everybody needs a four-year degree. For some people, they need an associate’s degree, trade school, an apprenticeship program, or other skilled training. Too many people think they can get a sociology degree and then a job that pays a $1 million a year without working. It doesn’t work like that.”

“We need to get back to working with our hands,” Tuberville said. “We need to restore a work ethic in this country.”

“I am not a Common Core guy. I believe in regular math,” Tuberville said. “We need to get back to teaching history.”

Tuberville is a former Auburn University head football coach.

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“I was lucky to have a job that I loved,” Tuberville said. “Every day I got up with a smile on my face even if we got beat on Saturday, because I enjoyed teaching young men.”

Tuberville said that we need to get family back in this country. Half of the young men who are playing for Nick Saban and Gus Malzahn have one or no parents. It makes it harder to teach discipline, he said.

Tuberville said that 76 years ago, his father was 18 years old when he fought at D-Day and then drove a tank all over Europe in World War II.

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Tuberville said that he supports President Donald Trump and has gotten quite close to the president in the morning, saying that the president has even called him at 2:34 in the morning. Tuberville asked if they had clocks in the White House. Trump responded, “Sleep is over rated.” Tuberville praised the president’s work ethic.

Tuberville said that he supports following the Constitution and appointing a replacement for Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg who died Friday.

Tuberville said that we have experienced a loss of some of our liberties during the pandemic and that everybody was eager to see their lives return to normal.

Tuberville added that he visited Orange Beach and the Alabama Gulf Coast impacted by Hurricane Sally. Many have lost homes. Some people have lost everything. Farmers who have been working for six months to grow a crop have seen it all destroyed — a total loss.

Tuberville promised that, if elected, he would work every day to bring God, the Bible and Christianity back into schools.

Tuberville is challenging incumbent Democratic Sen. Doug Jones in the Nov. 3 general election.

Secretary of State John Merrill said that Alabamians who are concerned with the coronavirus can vote absentee. Merrill said that voting by mail would be too costly and would increase the risk of voter fraud.

Merrill said that 96 percent of Black Alabamians who are eligible to vote are registered, 91 percent of eligible white Alabamians are registered and 94 percent of Alabamians are registered.

Merrill said that the state has set records for voter participation under his tenure and predicted record participation in November.

St. Clair Republican Party chair Ren Wheeler thanked Tuberville and Merrill for speaking to the over 90 St. Clair Republicans gathered at the courthouse.

Wheeler said that the steering committee recommended the party transfer $500 to the St. Clair Young Republicans. The executive committee voted in favor of the motion.

St. Clair Young Republican Chairman Logan Glass thanked the executive committee for the support and invited everyone to an election night victory party at the Pell City Steakhouse on Nov. 3.

St. Clair County vice chair Deborah Howard said that the St. Clair GOP bass tournament will be next month and it is time for boat sponsors to pay their money. The party is also looking at adding a crappie tournament.

Judge Phil Seay announced that the party had lost two of its longtime members. St. Clair County Commissioner Jimmy Roberts died on June 24. Roberts had been in office since 1994.

Former St. Clair County Republican Party Chairman Mike Fricker passed away on Sunday after a long illness. Seay said that when Fricker took over the St. Clair GOP there was only one Republican officeholder, County Commissioner Bruce Etheredge, in the county. By 2010, every St. Clair County officeholder was a Republican.

Wheeler asked the party members to keep former St. Clair Republican Party Chairman Paul Thibado in their prayers as he is suffering from kidney disease.

Howard said that the next meeting of the St. Clair Republican Party executive committee would be on Oct. 15 at the courthouse in Pell City.

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Lilly Ledbetter speaks about her friendship with Ginsburg

Micah Danney

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Lilly Ledbetter spoke during a virtual campaign event with Sen. Doug Jones on Sept. 21.

When anti-pay-discrimination icon and activist Lilly Ledbetter started receiving mail from late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Ledbetter’s attorney told her to save the envelopes. That’s how unusual it is to get personal mail from a member of the nation’s highest court.

Ledbetter, 82, of Jacksonville, Alabama, shared her memories of her contact with Ginsburg over the last decade during a Facebook live event hosted by Sen. Doug Jones on Monday.

Ginsburg famously read her dissent from the bench, a rare occurrence, in the Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. decision in 2007. The court ruled 5-4 to affirm a lower court’s decision that Ledbetter was not owed damages for pay discrimination because her suit was not filed within 180 days of the setting of the policy that led to her paychecks being less than those of her male colleagues. 

Ledbetter said that Ginsburg “gave me the dignity” of publicly affirming the righteousness of Ledbetter’s case, demonstrating an attention to the details of the suit.

Ginsburg challenged Congress to take action to prevent similar plaintiffs from being denied compensation due to a statute of limitations that can run out before an employee discovers they are being discriminated against. 

The Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 was passed by Congress with broad bipartisan support and signed into law by President Barack Obama. It resets the statute of limitation’s clock with each paycheck that is reduced by a discriminatory policy.

Ledbetter said that her heart was heavy when she learned of Ginsburg’s death on Friday. The women kept in touch after they met in 2010. That was shortly after the death of Ginsburg’s husband, tax attorney Marty Ginsburg. She spoke about her pain to Ledbetter, whose husband Charles had died two years before.

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“So we both shared that, and we shared a tear,” said Ledbetter.

Ginsburg invited her to her Supreme Court chambers to see a framed copy of the act, next to which hung a pen that Obama used to sign it.

Ginsburg later sent Ledbetter a signed copy of a cookbook honoring her husband that was published by the Supreme Court Historical Society. Included with it was a personal note, as was the case with other pieces of correspondence from the justice that Ledbetter received at her home in Alabama. They were often brochures and other written materials that Ginsburg received that featured photos of both women.

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Ledbetter expressed her support for Jones in his race against GOP challenger Tommy Tuberville. The filling of Ginsburg’s seat is a major factor in that, she said.

“I do have to talk from my heart, because I am scared to death for the few years that I have yet to live because this country is not headed in the right direction,” she said.

She noted that Ginsburg was 60 when she was appointed to the court. Ledbetter said that she opposes any nominee who is younger than 55 because they would not have the experience and breadth of legal knowledge required to properly serve on the Supreme Court.

She said that issues like hers have long-term consequences that are made even more evident by the financial strains resulting from the pandemic, as she would have more retirement savings had she been paid what her male colleagues were.

Jones called Ledbetter a friend and hero of his.

“I’ve been saying to folks lately, if those folks at Goodyear had only done the right thing by Lilly Ledbetter and the women that worked there, maybe they’d still be operating in Gadsden these days,” he said.

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