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Alabama reaches 3,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases

COVID-19 quarantine and prevention concept against the coronavirus outbreak and pandemic. Text writed with background of waving flag of the states of USA. State of Alabama 3D illustration.

Alabama has surpassed 3,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19, the Alabama Department of Public Health says.

As of Friday evening at 7 p.m., labs had confirmed 3,008 cases of the virus in the state. At least 80 people are dead after testing positive. At least 58 of those deaths have been verified by epidemiologists as caused primarily by the virus.

The state has conducted at least 20,605 tests, up from 10,000 on April 4.

The virus has been confirmed in all 67 of the state’s counties. Jefferson County still has the most cases in the state at 555, but Mobile County has had the fastest growth in newly confirmed cases in the past week, among counties with at least 100 cases, recording 382 cases by April 10, up from 103 on April 3.

East Alabama remains the hardest hit region of the state in terms of per capita cases. Chambers County has reported at least 171 cases of the virus, or 514 cases per 100,000 people. Jefferson County, by comparison, has only 84 cases per 100,000 people.

Check our data dashboard for the latest updates.

Chip Brownlee
Written By

Chip Brownlee is a former political reporter, online content manager and webmaster at the Alabama Political Reporter. He is now a reporter at The Trace, a non-profit newsroom covering guns in America.

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