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Ivey announces development of coronavirus relief fund expenditure request form

Thursday, Alabama Governor Kay Ivey (R) announced a Coronavirus Relief Fund Expenditure Request Form has been developed for the public to submit for reimbursement for expenses incurred from the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).

“As your governor, input from Alabama citizens is something I value and take into consideration each and every day,” Governor Ivey said. “I encourage anyone to submit your ideas on how our portion of the federal Coronavirus Relief Fund monies should be spent – anything that falls within the guidelines will be considered. Together, with the partnership of the people of our state, I am committed to making sure that Alabama is made as whole as possible from responding to this virus.”

On March 27, 2020, President Donald Trump signed the congressionally approved Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act into law. Among other provisions, the CARES Act established the $150 billion Coronavirus Relief Fund, of which roughly $1.8 billion has been allotted to the State of Alabama.

The CARES Act requires that the payments from the Coronavirus Relief Fund only be used to cover expenses that: are necessary expenditures incurred due to the public health emergency with respect to COVID–19; were not accounted for in the budget most recently approved as of March 27, 2020 (the date of enactment of the CARES Act) for the State or government; and were incurred during the period that begins on March 1, 2020 and ends on December 30, 2020.

In addition to federal guidelines, Alabama ACT 2020-199 (SB161) requires the State to only spend federal Coronavirus Relief Fund monies in one of the following categories: Reimburse state agencies for expenditures directly related to the coronavirus pandemic; Reimburse local governments for expenditures directly related to the coronavirus pandemic; Support the delivery of healthcare and related services to citizens of the Alabama related to the coronavirus pandemic; Support citizens, businesses, and non-profits and faith-based organizations of the state directly impacted by the coronavirus pandemic; Reimbursement of equipment and infrastructure necessary for remote work and public access to the functions of state government directly impacted by the coronavirus pandemic, including the Legislature; Expenditures related to technology and infrastructure related to remote instruction and learning; Reimbursement of costs necessary to address the coronavirus pandemic by the Department of Corrections; Reimbursement of costs necessary to ensure access to the courts during the coronavirus pandemic; Reimburse the State General Fund for supplemental appropriations to the Alabama Department of Public Health; and/or For any lawful purpose as provided by the United States Congress, the United States Treasury Department, or any other federal entity of competent jurisdiction.

All information will be processed by Governor’s Office.

The Coronavirus Relief Fund Expenditure Request Form is available here.

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The legislature had sought appropriations control over the $1.8 billion, requiring the governor to call a special session to appropriate the money. Senate leadership even went so far as to produce a wish list that included $200 million for a new Statehouse. Ivey rejected those demands and threatened to veto the state budgets if the legislature did not amend those demands, which had been added to a supplemental appropriations bill.

The coronavirus crisis and the economic shutdown to fight the spread of the coronavirus has done enormous damage to the economy. The Congressional Budget Office recently released a report claiming that it will take a decade for the economy to fully recover from the virus and the forced economic shutdown. Since February 27, 110,173 Americans have died from COVID-19, including 651 Alabamians. Globally the death toll from the global pandemic has reached 393,316. Many states and some nations are still under economic lockdown orders.

Brandon Moseley
Written By

Brandon Moseley is a senior reporter with over nine years at Alabama Political Reporter. During that time he has written 8,297 articles for APR. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Facebook. Brandon is a native of Moody, Alabama, a graduate of Auburn University, and a seventh generation Alabamian.

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