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Gov. Kay Ivey to Alabama: It’s now or never for Census participation

With the last day for Census 2020 participation set for Sept. 30, Gov. Kay Ivey is urging all Alabamians who have not completed their forms to do so as quickly as possible.

Alabama’s current self-response rate is 62.1 percent — 0.4 percent short of the self-response rate recorded in 2010, or 62.5 percent, according to information provided by the Census Bureau.

When added with responses generated to date by Census field workers, a total of 78.5 percent of Alabama households have responded. Ivey — alongside leadership from AlabamaCounts! — is targeting an 80 percent or higher total response rate by Sept. 30.

“I’ve said it since our March kick-off, and I will say it again: Alabama stands to lose too much if we do not reach our goal of maximum participation,” Ivey said. “This isn’t just money for our state — it’s money for our small communities, for our educational systems, for our roads and for our children. There is simply too much community funding at stake here to disregard this final call.”

Ivey’s office — alongside the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs and Alabama Counts! — has worked since March to ensure participation numbers statewide meet the mark. Recently, these efforts included the Sept. 2 launch of the Alabama Census Bowl, in which low-responding counties have the chance to win $65,000 for their schools through Census participation.

“It takes a matter of six minutes to play your part in determining the future of our state by completing the census,” Ivey said. “These integral six minutes will determine what our communities will look like, what our children’s education will be, and even what our healthcare can provide throughout the next decade.”

Alabamians can fill out the 10-question Census online at my2020Census.gov, by phone at 1-844-330-2020 or by traditional paper form. Socially distanced door-to-door Census takers are also targeting households statewide that have been identified as current non-participants.

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Any information given in the 2020 Census is protected by strict federal law.

“Folks, it’s now or never, and this is the time to act and to ensure Alabama has the future we hope to plan for,” Ivey said. “These last few weeks of Census 2020 are vital to our future as our federal representation, our economic development opportunities and our communities — and their citizens — will be impacted negatively unless we have a proper count.”

For more information, please visit alabama2020census.com.

The Alabama Political Reporter is a daily political news site devoted to Alabama politics. We provide accurate, reliable coverage of policy, elections and government.

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