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Gov. Kay Ivey signs medical marijuana bill into law

The law will allow doctors to prescribe medical marijuana for certain conditions, and establishes a regulatory commission.

(STOCK)

Gov. Kay Ivey on Monday signed into law a bill allowing for medical marijuana statewide, a bill that garnered support from many state lawmakers, Republicans included, who said during debates on the bill that medical marijuana could have aided loved ones who’ve suffered from medical conditions. 

Sen. Tim Melson, R-Florence, introduced Senate Bill 46, which creates the Alabama Medical Commission tasked with regulating medical marijuana in the state. The legislation will allow doctors to prescribe medical marijuana for chronic pain, nausea and weight loss from cancer, Tourette’s Syndrome, Parkinson’s, Crohn’s, PTSD, HIV/AIDS, autism, sickle cell and terminal illnesses.

“Signing SB 46 is an important first step. I would like to again thank Sen. Tim Melson and Rep. Mike Ball for their hard work over the last few years and their willingness to address the legitimate concerns,” Ivey said in a statement. “This is certainly a sensitive and emotional issue and something that is continually being studied.”

“On the state level, we have had a study group that has looked closely at this issue, and I am interested in the potential good medical cannabis can have for those with chronic illnesses or what it can do to improve the quality of life of those in their final days,” Ivey continued. “As research evolves, Sen. Melson and I discussed how critical it is to continue finding ways to work on this to ensure we have a productive, safe and responsible operation in Alabama.” 

Written By

Eddie Burkhalter is a reporter at the Alabama Political Reporter. You can email him at [email protected] or reach him via Twitter.

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