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Whatley concedes to Hovey 

Whatley, who’s held the seat for the past 12 years, said he plans to spend time with his family and focus on his law practice and other business interests. 

Alabama Senate candidate Jay Hovey, left, and incumbent Sen. Tom Whatley, right.

Tom Whatley has bowed out of the Alabama Senate District 27 race, leaving Jay Hovey as the winner and putting an end to one of the most controversial legislative races in recent state history. 

Whatley announced his decision in a text message statement that went out to supporters and media Friday morning, saying that he felt it was “in the best interest of his friends, colleagues, family and the Republican Party, for me to step away from this tied race so that we can move forward and have success in November.” 
Hovey will be a heavy favorite to win the seat outright following the general election in November. 
The Alabama Republican Party was set to hold yet another hearing on the outcome of the District 27 primary election on Friday morning. Hovey won that primary by a single vote, but the party’s candidate committee later declared it a tie, choosing to count the disqualified vote of a Tallapoosa woman. New information about the process that led to the disqualification had led the committee to reconsider the decision. 
But Whatley, who’s held the seat for the past 12 years, beat them to the decision. Whatley said he plans to spend time with his family and focus on his law practice and other business interests. 
Written By

Josh Moon is an investigative reporter and featured columnist at the Alabama Political Reporter with years of political reporting experience in Alabama. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Twitter.

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