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Alabama’s 2nd District voters seek progressive representation, new poll reveals key issues

The poll also revealed nuanced concerns among voters: 20 percent are primarily worried about voting rights, while 15 percent are focused on inflation and rising costs, and 12 percent on making health care more affordable.

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Voters in Alabama’s newly redrawn 2nd Congressional District are expressing a strong desire for a representative who champions a progressive agenda, focusing on issues such as voting rights, the rising cost of living, and the affordability of health care. This sentiment is highlighted in a new poll released today by the SPLC Action Fund and its affiliate, the New Southern Majority, a federal independent expenditure (IE) PAC.

Brandon Jones, the director of political campaigns for the SPLC Action Fund, emphasized the significance of these findings. “This research demonstrates that voters across Alabama’s new congressional district want true, progressive representation,” he stated. Jones further noted that the candidates’ stances on progressive policies will play a crucial role, as voters are eager to harness the political power their district now offers.

The poll results show a highly competitive race, with a significant 47 percent of voters still undecided. State Rep. Napoleon Bracy is currently leading with 15 percent support, followed by Shomari Figures at 9 percent, State Rep. Anthony Daniels at 8 percent, State Sen. Merika Coleman with 6 percent, Darryl Sinkfield at 5 percent, State Rep. Jeremy Gray at 4 percent, and State Rep. Juandalynn Givan at 2 percent. Notably, Sinkfield recently announced his withdrawal from the race.

In January, the organizations plan to host a candidate forum in Montgomery, offering voters a direct opportunity to engage with the candidates and understand their perspectives on critical issues and their vision for promoting equity and justice in the Deep South.

The poll also revealed nuanced concerns among voters: 20 percent are primarily worried about voting rights, while 15 percent are focused on inflation and rising costs, and 12 percent on making health care more affordable. Additionally, voters highlighted equal access to quality K-12 public schools (78 percent), expanding Medicaid (75 percent), attracting new, well-paying jobs (71 percent), advocating for voting rights through early voting options (67 percent), and ensuring the affordability of college and higher education (66 percent) as top priorities.

When asked in an open-ended question about the issue that matters most to them personally, voters again listed voting rights (22 percent), health care (16 percent), education (15 percent), and good-paying jobs (11 percent) as their primary concerns.

Regarding opinions on national figures, the poll found that only 10 percent of voters in the District have a favorable view of former President Donald Trump, with a significant 86 percent viewing him negatively. In contrast, Vice President Kamala Harris received a 76 percent favorability rating, with President Joe Biden’s favorability at 77 percent. Former President Barack Obama remains the most favorably viewed, with an 88 percent favorable rating.

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This poll, which surveyed 450 likely voters in the upcoming March Democratic primary, was conducted by Impact Research, based in Montgomery.

Bill Britt is editor-in-chief at the Alabama Political Reporter and host of The Voice of Alabama Politics. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Twitter.

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