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More than 11,000 scientists worldwide warn of “climate emergency”

Eddie Burkhalter

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In strongly worded new report signed by more than 11,000 scientists in 153 countries the authors lay bare a “climate emergency” they say requires rapid changes in the way humans live to prevent the worst predictions from coming true. 

Titled the “World scientists’ warning of a climate emergency” the report, published Tuesday in the journal Bioscience, shows with clear, simple charts and strong language what the scientists say is a need for quick changes to food and energy production, and a shift away from a “pursuit of affluence” and toward prioritizing basic needs and reducing inequality. 

 “Scientists have a moral obligation to clearly warn humanity of any catastrophic threat and to “tell it like it is.” On the basis of this obligation and the graphical indicators presented below, we declare, with more than 11,000 scientist signatories from around the world, clearly and unequivocally that planet Earth is facing a climate emergency,” the report opens. 

James McClintock, professor of polar and marine biology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham who has studied climate change for decades, told APR on Thursday that the report’s strong language is a sign of growing urgency among scientists globally. 

I think that this article, published in a reputable journal, reviewed by eminent scientists, and endorsed by the signatures of over 11,000 scientists – is indicative of the growing sense of urgency that scientists around the world are feeling about when it comes to truly addressing climate change,” McClintock said. “In some sense, scientists are reaching their own tipping point. Scientists, such as myself, are increasingly frustrated that society is generally moving forward with a business as usual model, despite strong factually based warnings from the scientific community that now span decades that climate change is already causing consideration, and in some cases, dire reductions in air quality, human health, biodiversity, and the integrity of our coastlines and oceans.”

McClintock said scientists also deeply understand that society has the technological tools to fully address climate change, and that by doing so “everyone stands to benefit through innovation, new jobs, and importantly, improved and sustainable, human health and condition.” 

 The report’s creation was headed by Oregon State University ecologists Bill Ripple and Christopher Wolf, William Moomaw at the Fletcher School at Tufts University, Thomas Newsome with the School of Life and Environmental Sciences at The University of Sydney, Phoebe Barnard with the Conservation Biology Institute in Oregon and with the African Climate and Development Initiative, at the University of Cape Town, in Cape Town, South Africa.

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Looking back over the last 40 years the report cites data showing drastic increases in greenhouse gas emissions, global tree cover loss, meat production and use of fossil fuels. Those changes track closely with an increase in surface temperatures, ocean heat, extreme weather events and decreases in Antarctic and Greenland ice mass and glacier thickness. 

“Despite 40 years of global climate negotiations, with few exceptions, we have generally conducted business as usual and have largely failed to address this predicament,” the report states. “The climate crisis has arrived and is accelerating faster than most scientists expected. It is more severe than anticipated, threatening natural ecosystems and the fate of humanity.” 

The study calls for a quick curtail in the loss of forests, marine and plant life, which all play roles in carbon cycling and storage. It also calls for prompt reductions in emissions of short-lived pollutants such as methane, soot and hydrofluorocarbons. 

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“Doing this could slow climate feedback loops and potentially reduce the short-term warming trend by more than 50% over the next few decades while saving millions of lives and increasing crop yields due to reduced air pollution,” the report states. 

 “It is important to note that the authors of this paper also make it clear that there is some good news: declines in global birth rates, decelerated forest loss in some regions, increases in solar and wind power, and institutional fossil fuel divestment to the tune of more than 7 trillion dollars, and the proportion of emissions covered by carbon pricing,” McClintock said. “In other words, with action, there is hope.”

Authors of the report wrote that the data was “designed to be useful to the public, policymakers, the business community, and those working to implement the Paris climate agreement, the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, and the Aichi Biodiversity Targets.”

The report comes as President Donald Trump has begun a yearlong process to exit from the Paris climate agreement, which would make the U.S., the second largest greenhouse gas producer, the only country to leave the agreement, aimed at combating climate change. 

According to the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication a majority of Alabamians – 58 percent – believe global warming is happening, while just 46 percent believe it’s caused by human activity, compared to 53 percent who think so nationwide. 

Asked if they are worried about global warming 52 percent of Alabamians said they were, 60 percent said global warming will harm plants and animals, 58 percent said it would harm future generations but just 37 percent said it would harm them personally. 

Alabamians seemed to agree, though, that lawmakers in the state and in Washington D.C. need to do more to address global warming. Fifty three percent said local officials and Alabama’s governor should do more, 54 percent said Congress should do more and 55 percent of Alabamians think Trump should do more to address global warming.

Eddie Burkhalter is a reporter at the Alabama Political Reporter. You can email him at [email protected] or reach him via Twitter.

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Interior Department designates new national recreational trail in Alabama

The designation is part of a broader national announcement that establishes 30 new national recreation trails in 25 states, adding more than 1,275 miles to the National Trails System.

Brandon Moseley

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Located in Cheaha State Park, the Doug Ghee Accessible Trail (Bald Rock Boardwalk) is a 0.3-mile boardwalk trail.

United States Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt this week designated a new national recreation trail in Alabama.

Located in Cheaha State Park, the Doug Ghee Accessible Trail (Bald Rock Boardwalk) is a 0.3-mile boardwalk trail that allows users of all abilities to journey through the enchanted hardwood forested foothills of the Appalachian Mountains.

The designation is part of a broader national announcement that establishes 30 new national recreation trails in 25 states, adding more than 1,275 miles to the National Trails System.

The announcement is in addition to the 370 miles of national recreation trails that were designated in 2018, bringing the Trump administration’s total to 49 national recreation trails added, spanning 1,645 miles.

“I encourage Americans to get outside, enjoy our incredible public lands and visit a nearby national recreation trail,” Bernhardt said. “Spanning more than 83,000 miles, larger than the interstate highway system, the National Trails System provides easy access to a wide variety of outdoor experiences. The Trump Administration is committed to expanding public access to the outdoors, so more Americans have the opportunity and ability to experience it in all of its splendor.”

Bernhardt said that the new designations advance the Trump administration’s priority to increase public access to outdoor recreational opportunities in alignment with Secretary’s Order 3366.

Interior-managed outdoor recreation activities support more than 452,000 jobs and account for more than $58 billion in economic output across the country.

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“American Trails promotes and maintains the database of our country’s National Recreation Trails (NRT) and applauds this new slate of Secretarial designations from the Department of the Interior,” said NRT executive director Mike Passo. “The NRT program brings vibrancy to the National Trail System by uniquely highlighting trails that are accessible, relatable, and serve a wide diversity of our nation’s public. With these designations, the NRT database at AmericanTrails.org exceeds 1,300 trails.”

“American Hiking Society welcomes the designation of 30 new National Recreation Trails that will create enhanced recreational opportunities for hikers and all types of trail users,” said American Hiking Society executive director Kate Van Waes. “Each trail selected to receive this honor must support a diversity of users, reflect its region, and be among America’s best trails, all qualities that benefit the hiking community.”

“Americans are enjoying close-to-home recreation and thanks to our amazing National Trails System, they have even more places to explore,” said PeopleForBikes President and CEO Jenn Dice. “With a 75 percent increase in bike ridership on trails this year, we commend the Department of the Interior for this expansion and granting our nation more access to the outdoors. Thanks to these initiatives, we’re getting closer to meeting the needs of a fast-growing community of people outdoors and on bikes finding joy, freedom and health on our trails nationwide.”

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The National Trails System, which includes national scenic, national historic, and national recreation trails, offers an abundance of scenic, historic and recreation trails for outdoor enjoyment on America’s public lands.

The system promotes preservation, public access, travel within and enjoyment and appreciation of the open-air, outdoor areas, and historic resources of the United States.

The National Recreation Trails Program is jointly administered by the National Park Service and the U.S. Forest Service, in conjunction with a number of federal and nonprofit partners.

The designation of a national recreation trail can be done by either the secretary of the interior or the secretary of agriculture on an existing local or regional trail with the consent of the federal, state, local, nonprofit or private entity that has jurisdiction over the trail.

Families are looking for more outdoor recreational activities such as hiking, fishing, hunting and camping given the dangers associated with group activities like sports, theaters and other activities during the coronavirus pandemic.

Hiking on the National Recreation Trails is a fun, safe activity that the whole family can enjoy while still maintaining CDC recommended social distancing.

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State shuts down flounder harvest in November

Fishermen can resume harvesting flounders Dec. 1, 2020, at 12:01 a.m.

Brandon Moseley

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(STOCK PHOTO)

The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Marine Resources Division reminded saltwater fishermen that harvesting any flounder (Paralichthys albigutta) during the month of November is prohibited.

“The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources’ Marine Resources Division would like to remind anglers of the flounder changes that were adopted on August 1, 2019,” the MRD announced. “Flounder will be closed for harvest during the entire month of November for both commercial and recreational fishermen.”

Fishermen can resume harvesting flounders Dec. 1, 2020, at 12:01 a.m.

The MRD reminds saltwater anglers that the recreational size limit for flounder is 14 inches total length, and the daily bag limit is five per person. The commercial size limit is 14 inches total length with a daily limit of 40 per person or 40 per vessel.

Alabama is a sportsman’s paradise with year-round freshwater fishing, saltwater fishing and hunting opportunities. Hunting and fishing are activities that the whole family can enjoy while still social distancing to avoid spreading the coronavirus. Remember that you must have a valid license to hunt or fish. You can get the appropriate licenses online.

The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources is tasked with promoting wise stewardship, management and enjoyment of Alabama’s natural resources through four divisions: Marine Resources, State Lands, State Parks and Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries. More information is available online.

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ADEM director weighs-in on coal ash pond closures

APR spoke with ADEM Director Lance LeFleur to understand the process and how the public could be assured that steps taken would lead to a safe and effective outcome.

Bill Britt

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ADEM Director Lance LeFleur

Over the next few weeks, the Alabama Department of Environmental Management will hold public hearings on the regulated closures of three coal combustion residuals storage sites, commonly referred to as coal ash ponds.

While ADEM receives high marks from federal regulators and businesses within Alabama, there is always a certain skepticism that surrounds environmental issues both on the left and the right side of the political spectrum.

Recently, APR spoke with ADEM Director Lance LeFleur to understand the process and how the public could be assured that steps taken would lead to a safe and effective outcome.

“I know that there’s skepticism about government,” LeFleur said. “And it’s healthy to have skepticism about government, state governments, local government, federal government. Skepticism is part of how we operate.” But LeFleur wants the public to know that ADEM’s first purpose is Alabamians’ health and safety.

“Our mission is to ensure for all Alabamians a safe, healthful and productive environment,” LeFleur said. “It’s a mission that ADEM and its nearly 600 employees take very seriously.”

LeFleur says while there are many competing sides to the issues that arise from coal ash disposal, ADEM must focus on “science and the laws.”

According to LeFleur, there are two primary issues that must be addressed when closing coal ash ponds: “avoid threats of spills into waterways or onto land, and preventing and cleaning up groundwater contamination from arsenic, mercury, lead and other hazardous elements that may leach from the coal ash.”

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EPA does not classify coal residue as hazardous waste, but LeFleur says that all closures must ensure dangerous elements are not leaching down into the groundwater.

“I think there’s pretty much unanimous opinion that these coal ash ponds need to be closed; they need to be closed properly,” said LeFleur. “And we need to clean up the groundwater that’s in place.”

He says that the entire process will take decades, but the power companies have committed to safely closing the coal ash ponds. “We are dealing with power companies that are going to be around for a long time. And they, they are obligated to get the result right,” said LeFleur.

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Alabama currently has 14 regulated CCR units at eight sites throughout the state. They are comprised of 10 unlined surface impoundments, one lined landfill, one lined surface impoundment all closed, and two lined landfills still in operation.

Public hearings are a significant part of the permit granting process, according to LeFleur, and ADEM’s website allows any individual to review every document and comment about a coal ash pond’s closing.

“You can see all of the comments that we received,” LeFleur said. “Every issue raised during the comment period and written response to comments are available.” ADEM’s website also includes the closure plans as well as all correspondence between agency and utility companies.

According to ADEM, the purpose of these hearings is to allow the public, including nearby residents, environmental groups, and others, opportunities to weigh in on the proposed permits.

“This past summer, Alabama Power, TVA, and PowerSouth held informational meetings in the communities where their affected plants are located to explain their proposed groundwater cleanup plan —including the CCR unit closure component— and answer residents’ questions,” said LeFleur.

Closing a unit requires months of planning with ADEM engineers to make sure all procedures are followed correctly. Federal rules for closing CCRs have only been around since April 2015, when EPA released final measures for management and disposal of CCRs from electric utilities. In 2018, ADEM issued its state CCR rule, which closely tracks the federal regulations.

Under both Presidents Obama and Trump, the EPA has allowed for coal ash sites to be closed by two methods — closure in place and by removal.

Alabama’s utilities have chosen the cap in place method. Some environmental groups prefer removal. But estimates say that moving CCRs from Alabama Power’s Plant Barry would take around 30 years with trucks leaving the site every six minutes.

“Regardless of which method of closure is used, that process will take a couple of years to accomplish at these sites,” said LeFleur. “If it’s kept in place, the material has been de-watered then pushed together to create a smaller footprint, and then that will be covered with an impervious cover.”

The objective, according to ADEM, is to protect the groundwater and the environment from pollution.

Power providers and environmentalists seem to agree there isn’t a perfect solution. Public hearings are to ensure that community voices and those of environmentalists are heard.

“This entire process is designed to stop contamination to groundwater and future contamination to groundwater; those are the most important facts now,” said LeFleur. “There are always political issues, you know, at least two sides, and sometimes there’s three, four or five sides. We focus on science and the laws. That’s what we do.”

While ADEM has its critics, it receives a high rating from the EPA, and an annual survey by the Alabama Department of Commerce finds that it gets top marks from business and industry in the state.

ADEM’s first public hearing on coal ash permits will be held Tuesday, Oct. 20, for Alabama Power’s Miller Steam Plant in west Jefferson County. The meeting will be at 6 p.m. at the West Jefferson Town Hall. Other upcoming hearings are Thursday, Oct. 22, for Plant Greene County located in Greene County and Oct. 29 for Plant Gadsden in Etowah County.

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Bow season begins today

Archery deer season opens in most of the state — zones A, B and C — on Oct. 15, 2020.

Brandon Moseley

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(STOCK PHOTO)

On Thursday, bow hunting season for deer opens across the state of Alabama, though it has already begun in some areas of the state.

The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources has divided the state into five separate hunting zones for whitetail deer. Be aware of where in the state you are at all times because different rules can and do apply. Some counties have as many as three of the state’s five hunting zones.

Hunters in the newly created zones D and E began bow hunting back on Oct. 1.

Zone D includes parts of Cullman, Franklin, Lawrence and Winston counties. Zone D allows for bow hunting for either sex from Oct. 1 to Jan. 15. Hunters can take antlered bucks from Oct. 1 to Jan. 27. Gun deer season for antlered bucks will open in zone D on Nov. 7, 2020.

Zone E includes areas in Barbour, Calhoun, Cleburne and Russell counties. Zone D allows for bow hunting for either sex from Oct. 1 to Oct. 15. Hunters can take antlered bucks from Oct. 1 to Jan. 27. Gun deer season for antlered bucks will open in zone E on Nov. 7, 2020.

Archery deer season opens in most of the state — zones A, B and C — on Oct. 15, 2020.

Archery season for both sexes in Zone A, the largest of the hunting zones, lasts from Oct. 15 to Feb. 10, 2021. Gun season in zone A for either sex runs from Nov. 21 to Feb. 10, 2021.

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Archery season in zone B goes from Oct. 15 to Feb. 10 for antlered bucks. For either sex from Oct. 25 to Feb. 10. Gun season in zone B is from Nov. 21 to Feb. 10.

Zone C consists of parts of St. Clair, Jefferson, Blount, Cullman, Etowah, Morgan, Winston, Marshall, Dekalb, Jackson, Lawrence, Franklin and Marion Counties.

Bow season in zone C for either sex runs from Oct. 15 to Feb. 10, 2021. Gun season in zone C for antlered bucks only is from Nov. 21 to Feb. 10, 2021. Hunters may take either sex with a gun in zone C from Nov. 21 to Nov. 29 and Dec. 19 to Jan. 1, 2021.

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You must purchase a license to hunt in the state of Alabama and you must report any and all deer taken to the state. Wildlife biologists use the data to set future hunting zones and harvest limits. For complete deer season dates and zone information, visit the Outdoor Alabama website.

“The creation of these new deer zones highlights the hard work of our wildlife managers and the importance of harvest data provided by Alabama’s hunters,” said Chris Blankenship, commissioner of the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. “The Department strives to offer the best hunting opportunities available.”

Whitetail deer are the largest game species in the state with a harvestable population. Hunting for whitetail deer is the most popular of the hunting sports in Alabama. Hunting and fishing are a fun activity the whole family can enjoy, while social distancing due to the coronavirus global pandemic.

The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources promotes wise stewardship, management and enjoyment of Alabama’s natural resources through four divisions: Marine Resources, State Lands, State Parks, and Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries.

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