Connect with us

National

Rogers opposes housing persons infected with coronavirus in Anniston

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

Saturday, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced that the Center for Domestic Preparedness (CDP) would be used as a quarantine center for some Americans exposed to Coronavirus (COVID-19). Congressman Mike Rogers, R-Saks, announced that he thinks this is the wrong decision and he is opposed to housing the coronavirus patients in Anniston.

“Earlier this evening, I spoke with President Trump. He agreed with me that the decision by the Department of Health and Human Services to house those Americans exposed to Coronavirus at the Center for Domestic Preparedness in Anniston is the wrong decision,” Rogers said in a statement. President Trump had no advanced notice and these individuals were brought to the continental United States without his consent. I will continue to work with President Trump and HHS to find the best facilities that meet the needs for those Americans that have been exposed to this dangerous virus. The CDP is not that place,” Rogers said.

The coronavirus is normally just the common cold. We have all had it multiple time. The novel (new) strain of the coronavirus appeared in Wuhan City, Hubei Province China in December. The new strain of the virus has been named SARS-Cov-2 and the disease the coronavirus disease 2019, which is being abbreviated as COVID-19

A percentage of people get the virus and show no symptoms. They feel nothing. Are they shedding the virus is a question researchers are still trying to understand. Most of the people who get the Novel strain of the coronavirus wake up with a fever and have flu-like symptoms. A not so small percentage have severe symptoms. Healthcare workers in Wuhan were particularly hit hard.

Efforts by the Chinese to contain this in Hubei Province failed and the disease has now spread to Beijing, Hong Kong, and 32 countries including the United States.

On January 30, 2020, the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee of the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a “public health emergency of international concern.” On January 31, 2020, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex M. Azar II declared a public health emergency (PHE) for the United States to aid the nation’s healthcare community in responding to COVID-19.

According to the CDC, Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in many different species of animals, including camels, cattle, cats, and bats. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can infect people and then spread between people such as with MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV, and now with this new virus (named SARS-CoV-2).

The SARS-CoV-2 virus is a beta-coronavirus, like MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV. All three of these viruses have their origins in bats. The sequences from U.S. patients are similar to the one that China initially posted, suggesting a likely single, recent emergence of this virus from an animal reservoir.

Public Service Announcement


While it likely began at a large live animal market in China and spread animal to person, person-to-person spread began both in China and beyond, including in the United States.

Both MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV have been known to cause severe illness in people. The complete clinical picture with regard to COVID-19 is not fully understood. The CDC and world health authorities have an ongoing investigations to learn more. The CDC says that this is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available. More cases are likely to be identified in the coming days, including more cases in the United States. It’s also likely that person-to-person spread will continue to occur, including in the United States.

The CDC is shipping test kits for the virus to laboratories CDC has designated as qualified, including U.S. state and local public health laboratories, Department of Defense (DOD) laboratories and select international laboratories. The test kits are bolstering global laboratory capacity for detecting SARS-CoV-2. The federal government is working closely with state, local, tribal, and territorial partners, as well as public health partners, to respond to this public health threat.

On January 21, the CDC activated its Emergency Operations Center to better provide ongoing support to the COVID-19 response. February 2, 2020, at 5:00 pm, the U.S. government suspended entry of foreign nationals who have been in China within the past 14 days.

U.S. citizens, residents, and their immediate family members who have been in Hubei province and other parts of mainland China are allowed to enter the United States, but they are subject to health monitoring and possible quarantine for up to 14 days.

The CDC has issued the following travel guidance related to COVID-19:
China — Level 3, Avoid Nonessential Travel — last updated February 22;
Japan — Level 2, Practice Enhanced Precautions — last updated February 22;
South Korea — Level 2, Practice Enhanced Precautions — issued February 22;
Hong Kong — Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions — issued February 19.
The CDC also recommends that all travelers reconsider cruise ship voyages into or within Asia at this time.

The CDC has deployed multidisciplinary teams to support state health departments with clinical management, contact tracing, and communications.

The CDC has worked with the Department of State, supporting the safe return of Americans who have been stranded as a result of the ongoing outbreaks of COVID-19 and related travel restrictions. CDC has worked to assess the health of passengers as they return to the United States and provided continued daily monitoring of people who are quarantined.

The CDC has been uploading the entire genome of the viruses from reported cases in the United States to GenBank as sequencing was completed. The CDC has grown the COVID-19 virus in cell culture, which is necessary for further studies, including for additional genetic characterization. The cell-grown virus was sent to NIH’s BEI Resources Repository for use by the broad scientific community.

According to the CDC, while the immediate risk of this new virus to the American public is believed to be low at this time, everyone can do their part to help us respond to this emerging public health threat: It’s currently flu and respiratory disease season and CDC recommends getting a flu vaccine, taking everyday preventive actions to help stop the spread of germs, and taking flu antivirals if prescribed. If you are a healthcare provider, be on the look-out for people who recently traveled from China and have fever and respiratory symptoms. If you are a healthcare provider caring for a COVID-19 patient or a public health responder, please take care of yourself and follow recommended infection control procedures. If you have been in China or have been exposed to someone sick with COVID-19 in the last 14 days, you will face some limitations on your movement and activity. Please follow instructions during this time. Your cooperation is integral to the ongoing public health response to try to slow spread of this virus. If you develop COVID-19 symptoms, contact your healthcare provider, and tell them about your symptoms and your travel or exposure to a COVID-19 patient. For people who are ill with COVID-19, please follow CDC guidance on how to reduce the risk of spreading your illness to others.

As of Sunday morning, there have been 78,966 cases of COVID-19. 53,079 of these are active. 23,418 people have recovered from their illness and been discharged. 2,469 have died. The number of deaths have doubled since February 12.

It affects the elderly worse than younger people. For 80+ years old the mortality rate is 14.8 percent, for 70-79 year old the mortality is 8 percent, for 60-69 years old 3.6 percent, for 50-59 years old 1.3 percent for 40-49 years old 0.4 percent, 30-39 years old 0.2 percent, 29 years old 0.2 percent, 10-19 years old 0.2 percent, and 0-9 years old there have not yet been any fatalities. The mortality rate for males is 2.8 percent. For females it is 1.7 percent.

Pre-existing conditions greatly increases the fatality rate. For those with cardiovascular disease the death rate is 10.5 percent, diabetes 7.3 percent, chronic respiratory disease 6.3 percent, hypertension 6.0 percent, cancer and 5.6 percent; though it has a death rate of .9 percent for those with no pre-existing conditions.

On Thursday, it was announced that educators have begun working on plans to use online education over the internet if American schools have to be closed in the event that COVID-19 becomes a pandemic in the United States forcing schools to close.

To this point there have been only 35 COVID-19 cases in the United States and no deaths.

Rogers serves as Ranking Member on the Committee on Homeland Security and a senior member of the House Armed Services Committee.

 

Advertisement

National

After long lines, in-person unemployment assistance will be appointment only

Eddie Burkhalter

Published

on

After news accounts of people driving across Alabama to camp out in a Montgomery parking lot overnight in hopes of getting help with their unemployment claims, the Alabama Department of Labor on Thursday announced new guidelines for seeing a worker in person. 

The COVID-19 pandemic and resulting large numbers of unemployed seeking help left the state’s Department of Labor struggling to process the thousands of applications that pour in daily.

The department said in a Facebook post Thursday that instead of continuing seeing people on a first come, first serve basis, beginning Monday, July 6, people will now have to make an appointment to be seen. Only 300 appointments will be available daily. 

The department has also changed the location to receive assistance from the Dunn-Oliver Acadome on the campus of Alabama State University to the Crump Senior Community Center, located at 1751 Cong W L Dickinson Drive in Montgomery. 

To register for an appointment, visit the department’s website here. Slots for appointments will be at 8 a.m., 10 a.m., 12 p.m. and 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Face masks are mandatory and temperatures will be taken on site, according to the department’s post.

Continue Reading

Congress

Sewell votes in favor of $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

U.S. Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Alabama, on Wednesday voted in favor of H.R. 2, the Moving Forward Act, a $1.5 trillion plan to rebuild American infrastructure.

“Our country is in serious need of bold and comprehensive infrastructure reform,” Sewell said. “This was true before the coronavirus pandemic and it has become increasingly urgent as we continue to grapple with the ongoing healthcare and economic crises resulting from the pandemic.”

“As a member of the Rural Broadband Task Force and a representative of a district that lacks adequate and comprehensive internet access, I am pleased that H.R.2 includes our bill the Accessible, Affordable Internet for All Act, comprehensive legislation which invests$100 billion for high-speed broadband infrastructure in underserved communities,” said Sewell. “This investment will go a long way toward helping people across my district have access to the high-speed, affordable internet services that are necessary in today’s economy. Additionally, the bill’s $40 billion investment in new wastewater infrastructure will be transformative for countless residents of Alabama’s 7th District who lack access to affordable and efficient wastewater services. If we fail to make these investments now, our Nation’s aging infrastructure will continue to collapse and millions of Americans will be left out of our hopeful economic recovery.”

As a member of the House Rural Broadband Task Force, Sewell co-led introduction of H.R. 7302, the Accessible, Affordable Internet for All Act, which invests $100 billion to build high-speed broadband in unserved and underserved communities and ensures that internet service will be affordable. H.R. 7302 provided the framework for the broadband provisions in H.R. 2.

Two of Rep. Sewell’s bills are included as key provisions in H.R. 2. H.R. 1680, New Markets Tax Credit Extension Act of 2019 is designed to spur private investment in low-income rural communities and urban neighborhoods by providing tax credits for private investments made in underserved communities. H.R. 3967, the Municipal Bond Market Support Act of 2019, would help local governments, non-profits, schools, hospitals, universities and other entities reduce costs associated with infrastructure and development projects.

Sewell also co-led three amendments to H.R. 2 that passed this week. These amendments would expand the role of Historically Black Colleges and Universities in DOT research, support HBCU infrastructure development, and create a carbon capture, utilization, and storage technology commercialization program and direct an air capture technology program within the Department of Energy.

Sewell’s office said that in light of the pandemic and as schools consider how best to provide resources to students remotely, H.R.2 will provide critical access to both students and teleworkers across Alabama’s 7th Congressional District.

H.R. 2 would invest more than $1.5 trillion in roads, bridges, transit systems, schools, housing, broadband access and other essential infrastructure.

Public Service Announcement


H.R. 2 now goes to the Senate, where Senate Republicans are likely to make a number of changes to the legislation. The Senate’s 60 votes to end a filibuster rule; however means that any infrastructure bill will have to have bipartisan support to pass the Senate.

Sewell is a member of the House leadership and is in her fifth term representing Alabama’s 7th Congressional District. Sewell had no primary challenger and no Republican is running against her in the Nov. 3 general election.

Continue Reading

Elections

Alabama Republican Assembly endorses Barry Moore

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

Congressional candidates Barry Moore’s campaign on Wednesday said the Alabama Republican Assembly has endorsed him for Alabama’s 2nd Congressional District.

Jennifer Montrose is the President of the Alabama Republican Assembly.

“We must have elected leaders who are committed to governing honestly and ethically and believe Barry Moore can best help our state and nation move forward in the November election,” Montrose said. “We hope you will agree with us and vote for this outstanding individual who we believe is committed to Life, Liberty and Family.”

Moore thanked the group in a statement.

“I want to thank the Alabama Republican Assembly for the vote of confidence this endorsement represents,” Moore said. “It’s an honor to be recognized in this way by this fine group of Conservatives.”

“I’ve always been committed to the conservative values I share with the ARA, and I’ll continue to fight for our Constitution, our rights, and our freedoms when I’m in Congress,” Moore continued. “I’ll do this not only to justify the faith groups like the ARA have in me but because it’s what I believe is right. The ARA knows I have a proven conservative voting record and I will always protect our 2nd amendment, take a pro-life stance, support term limits, and stand with President Trump.”

The Alabama Republican Assembly calls itself “the Republican Wing of the Republican Party.”

Moore continues to receive endorsements from prominent Alabama politicians and groups from across the state in his bid to go to the United States Congress.

Public Service Announcement


Moore faces Dothan businessman Jeff Coleman in the Republican primary runoff on July 14. Moore served in the Alabama House of Representatives from 2010 until 2018 and has been endorsed by both current and former members who served with him there.

Rep. Mike Holmes (R-Wetumpka) said, “I have served in the Alabama House with Rep. Barry Moore; and found him to be one of our Top Five Conservatives every year. I served with him at the RNC Convention in 2016 when Rep. Moore was one of the first to endorse Trump. He is still strongly aligned with Trump. I enthusiastically endorse Barry Moore for Congressional District 2!.”

Rep. Charlotte Meadows (R-Montgomery) said, “When Rep. Barry Moore served in the State House he chaired the Military and Veterans Affairs committee. He was instrumental in bringing the F-35 to Montgomery and he well understands the needs of our Veterans and the importance of our military bases to Alabama. He will always work to support both. I am proud to support Barry Moore for our next Congressman.”

Rep. Terri Collins (R-Decatur)said, “Barry Moore is a man of integrity and honor. He will represent Alabama well.”

Former Rep. Barry Mask (R-Alexander City) said, “Barry Moore is a fighting conservative who has been through the fire. As a veteran, he stands with our country and will fight to preserve it. He was a Trump man early on and has earned our trust.”

“It’s humbling to have so many leading Alabama Republicans endorse me in this race,” Moore said. “These are the people I served within the Alabama House, and they know me and what I stand for. I appreciate their endorsements, and I will do everything I can to honor their trust by continuing to represent the people of our District and our conservative values in Congress. I thank everyone who’s endorsed me, and those who have supported me in this race. I look forward to serving the people of Alabama and District 2 as their next Congressman.”

Moore has been endorsed by the Eagle Forum, Conservative Christians of Alabama, the American Workers Coalition, the Club for Growth, and the House Freedom Fund. He is a former member of the Alabama Legislature, a small businessman, a veteran, a husband, and a father of four from Enterprise.

Moore and his wife Heather own a waste disposal company. Moore is a small businessman, a veteran, a husband, and a father of four from Enterprise. He has a degree from Auburn University.

Continue Reading

National

Aderholt honors Jack Thompson

Brandon Moseley

Published

on

Congressman Robert Aderholt, R-Alabama, gave a speech this week on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives, honoring former Alabama Commissioner of Agriculture and Industries Jack Thompson, who passed away on Sunday.

“I would like to offer my sincere condolences to the family of Mr. Jack Alexander Thompson from Montgomery, Alabama,” Aderholt said. “Jack Thompson passed away on Sunday after a full life of eighty-eight years. He was an upstanding citizen of our state and a respected member of the Montgomery community.”

“Jack Thompson was an Alabamian through and through, as he was born in Colbert County in 1932 and remained in the state his entire life,” Aderholt continued. “After graduating from Colbert County High School, Jack Thompson married his sweetheart, Ruth Hester, at the age of twenty. Jack and Ruth were married for sixty-seven years and raised four wonderful children, which led to the additional joy of having grandchildren and great-grandchildren.”

“As a student, Jack dedicated his studies to agriculture, which is evident that it played a big role in his life for as long as he lived,” Aderholt said. “He earned is B.S. in Agriculture from Auburn University and his master’s in animal science from the University of Tennessee. If it was not clear before these degrees, it was clear afterwards – Jack was going to make a difference in agriculture and better the lives of many people along the way.”

“For the following thirty-one years Jack worked for the Auburn University Extension Service, where he engaged with 4-H students, Cattlemen, and Agronomy farmers in Montgomery, Elmore, and Limestone counties,” Aderholt said. “After retiring, Jack went on to own a farm in Athens, Alabama and served as the Assistant Commissioner of Agriculture before assuming the role of Commissioner of Agriculture and Industries for four years. Jack also combined his two passions, agriculture and Auburn University, and lobbied for financing to construct the Ag and Industries Thompson Bishop Sparks Diagnostic Lab on Auburn’s campus. This was quite the undertaking, but Jack got it done, and he went on to do much more.”

“As a volunteer, Jack Thompson’s list of service roles is incredible,” Aderholt said. “He was president of the Athens-Limestone Chamber of Commerce; Campaign Chairman of the United Way; president of the Limestone County Cattlemen’s Association, a lifetime Director of the State Cattlemen’s Association; a lifetime member of the Athens Industrial Development Association; and was a board member at the Salvation Army. Jack also worked with 4-H kids in coordinating with state, district, and local steer shows and managed livestock for what is now the Alabama National Fair.”

“Jack Thompson is now survived by his four children; David Thompson, Keith Thompson, Susan Woodham, and Janice Thompson,” Aderholt said. “In addition, he is survived by his sister, Ann Thomas, and his eleven grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. It is with a heavy heart for the family of Mr. Jack Thompson and the community of Montgomery, Alabama that I submit this statement into the Congressional Record in recognition of the life of Mr. Jack Thompson. His legacy will live on well into the future.”

Aderholt represents Alabama’s 4th Congressional District.

Public Service Announcement


Continue Reading
Advertisement

Authors

Advertisement

The V Podcast

Facebook

Trending