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Natural gas company Spire suspends disconnections, late fees until at least May

Eddie Burkhalter

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Natural gas company Spire on Wednesday announced that due to the COVID-19 pandemic its employees would now only do essential work, and disconnections and late fees for customers have been suspended until at least May 1. 

“If you’re worried about your natural gas bill, please give us a call. We’re always here for you, ready to work with you on finding the best solution for your situation,” The company said in a statement.

Spire’s full statement: 

To all those we serve,

As your local natural gas provider, we’ve been closely monitoring the evolving coronavirus events across the communities we serve—because we believe nothing is more important than your safety and the safety of Spire employees. This holds true whether we’re delivering energy to homes and businesses or doing our part in preventing the spread of the virus.

And that balance of delivering reliable energy while helping our communities stay safe is incredibly important right now, because we’re considered an essential utility and part of our nation’s vital energy infrastructure.

As an “essential service” designated by government authorities, we’ll continue to operate even under a state of emergency and any shelter in place orders.

So, when you see our field technicians working, know that we’re there to provide you with the energy you need to cook homemade dinners and warm your homes while our communities shelter in place.

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Simply put, these are uncertain times. And as we face them together, your trust in us is important.

So, I’d like to share with you what we’ve been doing to take action and care for each other and all those we serve.

For you, our customers

We’ve adjusted the services we provide, performing only essential work. This will help protect both you and our team members as we continue to closely monitor developments. The CDC is regularly updating their guidelines and best practices, and we are following these guidelines carefully.

We’ve officially suspended late fees, disconnection notices and disconnections until at least May 1. If you’re worried about your natural gas bill, please give us a call. We’re always here for you, ready to work with you on finding the best solution for your situation.

We’ve provided field employees with the tools they need to do their jobs, requiring everyone to maintain social distancing and safety guidelines provided by the CDC. And, we’ve increased the frequency of deep cleanings of our equipment and at our facilities. 

 For our employees

Because we live and work in the communities we serve, caring for our employees has an impact on our communities at large. That’s why we:

  • Enacted our preparedness response plan, which defines how we adjust the service we provide in response to the changing situation
  • Canceled all travel and events
  • Provided emergency leave for employees who are unable to work from home and are quarantined, caring for a loved one who is quarantined or taking care of a child or family member because of coronavirus-related school and child care facility closures
  • Ensured all employees who can work from home do so

As an essential service that you depend on, we’ll continue to monitor our processes as the situation evolves. And, if you’d like more information about all we’re doing to keep Spire employees and communities safe, visit us 24/7 at  SpireEnergy.com/Coronavirus.

Through it all, our promise to you is that we’re focused on the safety and well-being of those we serve.

We’re in this together.

 

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Health

Ivey awards more than $17 million in federal coronavirus aid to local agencies

Eddie Burkhalter

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More than $17 million in coronavirus relief aid has been awarded to 20 state community action agencies, Gov. Kay Ivey’s office announced Friday. 

“COVID-19 has disrupted lives in many ways and in varying degrees,” Gov. Ivey said in a statement. “It is my hope that the services provided by these funds will help people as they work toward a quick and complete economic recovery.”

The Community Service Block grants made available by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will be used by the various local agencies to provide aid to those impacted by the pandemic, including seniors,  the disabled and low-income families, according to a press release from Ivey’s office. 

“Gov. Ivey is determined to help Alabama and Alabamians emerge from this pandemic as strong if not stronger than ever,” ADECA Director Kenneth Boswell said. “ADECA stands ready to be a part of that process with the funds made available through our programs.”

Agencies, amounts and coverage areas include:

  • Community Action Agency of Northwest Alabama Inc. – $668,160 (Colbert, Franklin and Lauderdale counties)
  • Community Action Partnership Huntsville/Madison and Limestone Counties – $1.05 million (Limestone and Madison counties)
  • Community Action Agency of Northeast Alabama Inc. – $1.35 million (Blount, Cherokee, DeKalb, Jackson, Marshall, and St. Clair counties)
  • Community Action Partnership of North Alabama – $775,602 (Cullman, Lawrence and Morgan counties)
  • Marion-Winston Counties Community Action Committee Inc. – $226,538 (Marion and Winston counties)
  • Walker County Community Action Agency Inc. – $273,782 (Walker County)
  • Community Action Agency of Talladega, Clay, Randolph, Calhoun and Cleburne counties – $1.02 million (Calhoun, Clay, Cleburne, Randolph, and Talladega counties)
  • Community Action of Etowah County Inc. – $379,592 (Etowah County)
  • Pickens County Community Action Committee and Community Development Corp. Inc. – $117,329 (Pickens County)
  • Community Service Programs of West Alabama Inc. – $1.65 million (Bibb, Choctaw, Dallas, Fayette, Greene, Lamar, Perry, Sumter and Tuscaloosa counties)
  • Jefferson County Committee for Economic Opportunity – $2.19 million (Jefferson County)
  • Community Action Committee Inc. of Chambers, Tallapoosa, Coosa – $351,259 (Chambers, Coosa and Tallapoosa counties)
  • Community Action Partnership of Middle Alabama Inc. – $793,918 (Autauga, Chilton, Elmore and Shelby counties)
  • Montgomery Community Action Committee and Community Development Corp. Inc. – $911,887 (Montgomery County)
  • Alabama Council on Human Relations Inc. – $550,919 (Lee County)
  • Macon-Russell Community Action Agency Inc. – $375,068 (Macon and Russell counties)
  • Organized Community Action Program Inc. – $806,165 (Bullock, Butler, Covington, Crenshaw, Dale, Lowndes and Pike counties)
  • Community Action Agency of South Alabama – $1.24 million (Baldwin, Clarke, Conecuh, Escambia, Marengo, Monroe, and Wilcox counties)
  • Southeast Alabama Community Action Partnership Inc. – $827,944 (Barbour, Coffee, Geneva, Henry and Houston counties)
  • Mobile Community Action Inc. – $1.77 million (Mobile and Washington counties)
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Crime

More prison workers, inmates test positive for COVID-19

Eddie Burkhalter

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Four more prison workers and three inmates have tested positive for COVID-19, the Alabama Department of Corrections announced Thursday. 

Workers at the Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women, the Elmore Correctional Facility, the Kilby Correctional Facility and the Bibb Correctional Facility self-reported positive coronavirus test results, according to an ADOC press release. 

Fifty-one cases among prison staff remain active while 25 workers who tested positive have been cleared to return to work. 

One inmate at the Easterling Correctional Facility and another at Tutwiler prison were moved into isolated areas in the facilities’ infirmaries after testing positive for the virus, according to the release. There have been 17 confirmed COVID-19 cases among staff at Tutwiler and 2 infected inmates. 

In addition to those two new confirmed cases, an inmate at the St. Clair Correctional Facility who had pre-existing medical conditions was taken to a local hospital after exhibiting coronavirus symptoms, where he tested positive for the virus. 

Thirteen of 22 confirmed COVID-19 cases among inmates remain active, according to ADOC. 

ADOC has tested 191 of approximately 22,000 inmates as of Wednesday.

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Crime

Second inmate dies after testing positive for COVID-19

Eddie Burkhalter

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William Hershell Moon, 74, died Wednesday at a hospital after testing positive for COVID-19, the Alabama Department of Corrections announced Wednesday. 

Moon, who was serving a life sentence at the St. Clair Correctional Facility, had a history of chronic medical problems, ADOC said in the statement.

He began exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19 after returning to the facility from a local hospital and was tested and confirmed to have the virus, according to the statement.

An exact cause of death is pending an autopsy.

“The Alabama Department of Corrections (ADOC) extends its sympathies to the Moon family and his loved ones during this difficult time,” the statement reads. 

Moon became the second inmate in the state who died after testing positive for COVID-19. Dave Thomas, 66, a terminally ill man serving at St. Clair prison, died April 16 after testing positive for the virus. 

ADOC on Tuesday said four inmates who had been housed in the same area as Moon have also tested positive for COVID-19, and the area was placed on level-two quarantine, limiting those inmates to that area.

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The entire infirmary at St. Clair remains on level-one quarantine, in which inmates are monitored for symptoms and have temperature checks twice daily, according to ADOC. 

In addition to Moon’s death, ADOC announced four more prison workers have tested positive for coronavirus.

A worker at Elmore Correctional Facility, an employee at Fountain Correctional Facility, one at Kilby Correctional Facility and another at Montgomery Women’s Facility all self-reported confirmed cases of the virus. 

The new cases among staff make 72 confirmed COVID-19 cases in 20 state facilities. Twenty-one of those workers have since been cleared to return to work. 

Ten of 19 confirmed cases among inmates remained active as of Wednesday, according to ADOC. The department has tested 178 of the state’s approximately 22,000 inmates as of Tuesday, according to ADOC.

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Crime

Seven inmates, seven workers test positive for COVID-19

Eddie Burkhalter

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The Alabama Department of Corrections on Tuesday said in a statement that seven more prison workers and seven additional inmates have tested positive for COVID-19. 

Four workers and one woman serving at the Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women all tested positive for coronavirus, according to an ADOC press release. There are 16 confirmed cases among staff at the facility. 

The woman serving at Tutwiler prison continues to be asymptomatic and was tested pre-operation for a scheduled surgery, according to the release, which states she has been moved to “medical isolation” and the dormitory where she was housed has been placed on on level-one quarantine, meaning inmates will be monitored for symptoms and have temperature checks twice daily. 

Other positive test results came back for a worker at Ventress Correctional Facility, another at the Alex City Community Based Facility and Community Work Center and one at the Birmingham Community Based Facility and Community Work Center, according to ADOC. 

Four inmates at the St. Clair Correctional Facility who also tested positive for COVID-19 were living in the same small area within the prison’s infirmary as an inmate who previously tested positive for the virus, according to the release. That living area remains on level-two quarantine, meaning inmates remain there for all daily activities, and the entire infirmary at St. Clair remains on level-one quarantine.

One inmate at the Kilby Correctional Facility and another at the Frank Lee Community Based Facility/Community Work Center also tested positive for  COVID-19. 

The man serving at Kilby prison was housed in the facility’s infirmary, and was transferred to a local hospital after showing symptoms of the virus, where he tested positive, according to ADOC. Kilby’s infirmary has been placed on level-one quarantine.

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The inmate at Frank Lee developed symptoms of COVID-19 and was taken to the Staton Correctional Facility to an area under level-two quarantine, where he subsequently tested positive, according to the department. He was then taken to medical isolation at Kilby prison,  and the facility was placed on level-one quarantine. 

There have been 68 confirmed cases among prison workers in the state, while 17 have since been cleared to return to work. 

Ten of the 19 confirmed COVID-19 cases among inmates remain active, according to ADOC. As of Monday the state has tested 176 of Alabama’s approximately 22,000 inmates, according to the department.

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