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Katie Britt displeased with Senate passage of bipartisan infrastructure bill

“I would have been a firm ‘no’ vote on this bill on its own merits,” Britt said.

Katie Boyd Britt speaks before the Business Council of Alabama.

Senate candidate Katie Boyd Britt expressed her disappointment Tuesday with the bipartisan infrastructure bill that passed the Senate. HR3684 would authorize $1 trillion in new spending to address the Biden administration’s infrastructure priorities. Both Sens. Richard Shelby and Tommy Tuberville voted against the package.

“I appreciate Senators Shelby and Tuberville standing strong and voting against this Trojan horse $1 trillion spending bill,” Britt said. “We have significant infrastructure needs here in Alabama and across our nation, from roads and bridges to broadband. However, this bill invests less than 20% in these vital needs, while also taxing and imposing stifling regulation on an industry Congress seems to know nothing about.”

“I would have been a firm ‘no’ vote on this bill on its own merits, but knowing it’s simply a means to an end for Democrats to force through their radical $3.5 trillion wishlist without any Republican support makes today’s vote even more disappointing.”

The national debt has ballooned to $28.6 trillion and the Biden administration’s America Rescue Act followed by this infrastructure bill and then the Democrats’ partisan $3.5 trillion spending will greatly balloon that in Biden’s first 12 months in office.

“The federal government’s spending is beyond out-of-control and will only worsen our growing inflation problem,” Britt warned. “It’s time for the next generation to stand up and fight Washington’s efforts to burden our children and our children’s children with an untenable amount of debt.”

Britt also was very vocal about the damage new rules on cryptocurrency trading could have on the cryptocurrency markets. Those bipartisan concerns went ignored in the final version of the infrastructure bill that passed the Senate on Tuesday.

“I support American innovation and entrepreneurship, including in the crypto space, and want to see the digital asset broker issue clarified in a way that ensures that the federal government is not putting their thumb on the scale,” Britt said. “We should be encouraging competition here in America, not driving economic activity overseas.”

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Britt formerly worked as president and CEO of the powerful Business Council of Alabama. She is an attorney and previously was chief of staff for Shelby.

Britt is 37 years old and a native of Enterprise. She is a graduate of the University of Alabama and the University of Alabama School of Law. She presently is a member of the Business service group, Finance, and real estate groups at Butler Snow and has practiced in the fields of corporate law, mergers and acquisitions, commercial lending, etc. in Alabama courts.

Britt and her husband, former University of Alabama and New England Patriots football player Wesley Britt, reside in Montgomery. They have two children.

Britt faces a crowded GOP primary field including businesswoman Jessica Fair Taylor, former Ambassador to Slovenia, Lynda Blanchard and Congressman Mo Brooks, R-Alabama. Former Brighton Mayor, Brandaun Dean, is running for the U.S. Senate as a Democrat.

HR3684 is radically different than the very partisan infrastructure bill that originally passed out of the House. To get bipartisan support and lift the filibuster many of the Green New Deal and other Democratic spending provisions were removed in the Senate. The bill now goes back to the House where it is expected to pass. Most of the removed Democratic priorities for things like charging stations across the country are in the spending bill which can pass the Senate through the budget reconciliation process on a simple majority vote.

President Joe Biden (D) praised the passage of the infrastructure bill. 

The Republican Primary is on May 24, 2022.

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Written By

Brandon Moseley is a senior reporter with over nine years at Alabama Political Reporter. During that time he has written 8,941 articles for APR. You can email him at [email protected] or follow him on Facebook. Brandon is a native of Moody, Alabama, a graduate of Auburn University, and a seventh generation Alabamian.

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