Line of Succession

September 1, 2015

By Bill Britt
Alabama Political Reporter 

MONTGOMERY—After reports of the State’s first lady filing for divorce from Gov. Robert Bentley, questions concerning executive succession began to surface. According to Article 5, Section 127 of the 1901 Constitution, the order of succession is as follows: 

Governor

Lieutenant Governor

President Pro Tempore of the Senate

Speaker of the House of Representatives

Attorney General

State Auditor

Secretary of State

State Treasurer

This is not to suggest that Gov. Bentley has given any indication he is thinking of leaving his office. 

But, if the governor did leave office, he would be succeeded by the Lt. Governor.

The Senate President Pro Tem would then assume the leadership of the Senate, but would not take the office of Lt. Governor.

William Ryan DeGraffenried, Jr. served as President Pro Tem of the Alabama State Senate from 1987 to 1995. After Governor H. Guy Hunt was removed from office due to criminal conviction, Lt Governor, Jim Folsom, Jr. became governor. DeGraffenried, as the President Pro Tem of the State Senate, became next-in-line for the governorship for the remainder of the quadrennium.

Article 5, Section 127

Succession to office of governor; filling of vacancy when offices of governor and lieutenant governor both vacant; procedure when governor or successor impeached, absent from state, disabled, etc.; failure of governor-elect, lieutenant governor-elect, etc., to qualify.

In case of the governor’s removal from office, death or resignation, the lieutenant governor shall become governor. If both the governor and lieutenant governor be removed from office, die or resign more than sixty days prior to the next general election, at which any state officers are to be elected, a governor and lieutenant governor shall be elected at such election for the unexpired term, and in the event of a vacancy in the office, caused by the removal from office, death or resignation of the governor and lieutenant governor, pending such vacancy and until their successors shall be elected and qualified, the office of governor shall be held and administered by either the president pro tem. of the senate, speaker of the house of representatives, attorney-general, state auditor, secretary of state, or state treasurer in the order herein named.

In case of the impeachment of the governor, his absence from the state for more than twenty days, unsoundness of mind, or other disability, the power and authority of the office shall, until the governor is acquitted, returns to the state, or is restored to his mind, or relieved from other disability, devolve in the order herein named, upon the lieutenant governor, president pro tem. of the senate, speaker of the house of representatives, attorney-general, state auditor, secretary of state, and state treasurer. If any of these officers be under any of the disabilities herein specified, the office of the governor shall be administered in the order named by such of these officers as may be free from such disability.

If the governor shall be absent from the state over twenty days, the secretary of state shall notify the lieutenant governor, who shall enter upon the duties of governor; if both the governor and lieutenant governor shall be absent from the state over twenty days, the secretary of state shall notify the president pro tem. of the senate, who shall enter upon the duties of governor, and so on, in case of such absence, he shall notify each of the other officers named in their order, who shall discharge the duties of the office until the governor or other officer entitled to administer the office in succession to the governor returns. If the governor-elect fail or refuse from any cause to qualify, the lieutenant governor-elect shall qualify and exercise the duties of governor until the governor-elect qualifies; and in the event both the governor-elect and the lieutenant governor-elect from any cause fail to qualify, the president pro tem. of the senate, the speaker of the house of representatives, the attorney-general, state auditor, secretary of state, and state treasurer, shall, in like manner, in the order named, administer the office until the governor-elect or lieutenant governor-elect qualifies.

Zeigler Calls Bentley’s Threats to Parks Political

August 20, 2015

 

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

jim-zieglerGovernor Robert Bentley (R) continues to threatened closing Alabama State Parks unless the legislature passes draconian tax increases on the people of Alabama.  Alabama Auditor Jim Zeigler accused Gov. Bentley of using the parks to pressure the legislature and the public to support higher taxes.

Auditor Jim Zeigler said in a statement, “90 percent of the money to run our state parks comes from admission fees and sales. There is no reason to close them if the tax increases do not pass. This is an obvious political threat to pressure the legislature and the public to support the Bentley tax increases.”
Read More

Bentley Defends His Decision to Take Down Confederate Flags

July 6, 2015

 

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

The Confederate flag issue continues to resonate across Alabama like no issue has in years. Thousands of Alabamians have expressed their anger to the Governor in letters, emails, phone calls, and signing online petitions to have the flags restored to their place honoring those who served the state in the short lived Confederate States of America (C.S.A). Others however have expressed support for the Governor’s unexpected Executive Action.
Read More

Zeigler Questions the Wisdom of Building the Massive Gulf Resort

June 2, 2015

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

On Monday, June 1, State Auditor Jim “Zig” Zeigler (R) joined the chorus of voices asking why the State of Alabama is borrowing $50 million to build a massive resort on the Gulf of Mexico while it is threatening to close up to 20 state parks due to lack of funds.

Auditor Zeigler said in a written statement, “In Montgomery, the right hand does not know what the left hand is doing. While the Governor is claiming we are broke and need a $541 million tax increase, he asks for $50 million to build a luxury facility on the Gulf. It would not be a “Gulf State Lodge” for the people, but a higher-priced center for upscale travelers. Shouldn’t this be done by private investors with their own money on their own land? Should our state government go into the resort business and into $50 million debt?”
Read More

Zeigler Promotes Elimination of State Agency to Keep Parks Open

April 23, 2015

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

Tuesday, April 21 Alabama State Auditor Jim Zeigler (R) introduced his plan to save the State Parks System by identifying $13 million in savings by defunding the office of the Examiner of Public Accounts.

Zeigler announced his plan in a speech to the Tuscaloosa Rotary Club.  Auditor Zeigler said that he is proposing that the auditing of state agencies be privatized and done by private CPA firms. That would eliminate the Examiners of Public Accounts and its $13 million a year budget.  That money would be used instead for the parks.
Read More

Zeigler To Inspect Damage On North Eufaula Avenue

January 28, 2015

Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

Alabama Auditor Jim Zeigler (R) has announced that he will visit the City of Eufaula on Friday, Jan. 30 to personal inspect alleged damage to the North Eufaula Avenue historic median by the Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT).

ALDOT is working on the median in order to create a four-lane US 431, despite objections from the adjoining property owners and the supporters of the Nationally renowned Eufaula historic district.
Read More

Eufaula Council Withdraws Opposition To Paving Historic District Median

January 14, 2015

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

On Friday, January 9, State Auditor-elect Jim Zeigler (R) announced in a written statement that the Eufaula city council has voted 3-2 to withdraw their opposition to the State’s four-laning of First Avenue through the North Eufaula historic district and to give the State permission to do the work.

Jim Zeigler is an attorney for the citizens who opposed the controversial road widening project. Zeigler called the council action “very disappointing and a big setback to our fight to stop the damage to the historic avenue.”
Read More

Zeigler Files Emergency Motion to Halt Eufaula Road Work

January 8, 2015

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

Wednesday, January 7 Alabama State Auditor Elect Jim Zeigler (R) has filed an emergency motion asking the court to halt controversial roadwork on Eufaula’s historic First Avenue.

Jim Zeigler told the ‘Alabama Political Reporter’ that the Alabama Department of Transportation is pushing ahead on this project to four lane six blocks of Highway 431 because they don’t want any review of the project.

Zeigler said that the state could have requested federal funding for this project but instead are using state dollars because the federal government would have required environmental impact and historical impact studies of the project that they knew this project would never pass any sort of review.
Read More

Zeigler Tries To Block Eufaula Road Widening

January 7, 2015

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

On Monday, January 5, Alabama state Auditor elect Jim Zeigler (R) announced that he filed a request for a last-minute motion to block the controversial “four-laning” of an historic Avenue in Eufaula.

State Auditor Zeigler wrote on Facebook, “Workers are expected to start Tuesday paving a six-foot strip the entire avenue of historic Eufaula Pilgrimage, made famous in the movie “Sweet Home Alabama.” But it may be a race between the bulldozers and the bulldog, as State Auditor-elect Jim Zeigler filed for a temporary restraining order.”
Read More

What To Do About Alabama’s Overcrowded Prisons

December 29, 2014

By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

Alabama houses a lot of dangerous criminals and it is struggling to come up with a plan to lower prison overcrowding without seeing a massive spike in crime.  In a perfect world, we would simply double our number of prison beds. But, with a projected $25 million gap in funding for the troubled State General Fund, it is impossible for the State to fund a $200 million bond issue to build modern prisons. The existing prisons are already dangerously understaffed and are facing lawsuits of alleged sexual harassment of prisoners and potential human rights violations.  The threat of a Federal takeover to deal with prison issues remains a possibility.
Read More

© Copyright 2017 Alabama Political Reporter