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Republicans Angry Over Revelation that Administration Knew Millions Would Lose Health Insurance

Brandon Moseley

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By Brandon Moseley
Alabama Political Reporter

NBC News has revealed that when President Obama assured Americans that have health insurance they like they could keep their health insurance the administration knew (like everyone with any understanding of how insurance works knew) that that was untrue. Alabama Republicans were quick to join the chorus of conservative voices expressing outrage at the revelations.

Congresswoman Martha Roby (R) from Montgomery said in a video statement,

“Remember when President Obama said over and over again that ‘if you like your health care plan, you will be able to keep your healthcare plan’? Well, it turns out that wasn’t true, as thousands of Alabamians and millions across America are facing health insurance cancellations or skyrocketing costs.”

Alabama State Senator Paul Bussman (R) from Cullman said on Facebook,

“The truth starts to finally be exposed by the mainstream media….I am truly concerned that Obamacare and the lack of honesty in government will destroy this country. The ‘Greatest Generation’ and veterans, who made this country the greatest country in the world, must be totally disgusted. Lying, underhanded deals, lack of personal responsibility, too many damaging handouts and programs that encourage laziness, etc. etc. SAD days in America! I pray daily for God’s intervention.”

The Speaker of the Alabama House of Representatives Mike Hubbard (R) from Auburn said on Facebook,

“The Obama Administration finally told the truth about Obamacare today. After four years of reassuring us that if we liked our health insurance policy, we would be able to keep it, the White House acknowledged that is not true. This is one reason why I have called on Washington to grant every American amnesty from this law.”

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Speaker Hubbard is circulating a petition opposing Obamacare Act.

Alabama Republican Party Chairman Bill Armistead wrote,

“The federal government refuses to release actual enrollment figures, presumably in attempts to mask the true level of failure of this political disaster. Every day, more and more Americans are finding out that their health care premiums are doubling and even tripling. The premium rises are impossible to afford. Even worse, people are receiving letters notifying them that their health care coverage is being dropped and now must find coverage through the exchange.”

Rep. Roby said,

“President Obama broke his promise, and hardworking Americans who took the president at his word are paying the price. That’s why this week I am co-sponsoring legislation that would make this right by protecting Americans who are losing their health plans because of ObamaCare. The ‘Keep Your Health Plan Act’ would allow health care plans available today on the individual market to continue to be offered so people have the option to keep what they have if they like it. The bill also ensures that Americans maintaining their health care plan as they were promised they could will not face a penalty under ObamaCare.”

The “Keep Your Health Plan Act,” was authored by Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton (R-MI). It promises that individual policy holders who like their healthcare are truly allowed to keep it as the President originally promised.

This current firestorm around the unpopular Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly called Obamacare) was started when NBC News’s Lisa Myers and Hannah Rappleye wrote a piece in which they said,

“President Obama repeatedly assured Americans that after the Affordable Care Act became law, people who liked their health insurance would be able to keep it. But millions of Americans are getting or are about to get cancellation letters for their health insurance under Obamacare, say experts, and the Obama administration has known that for at least three years.”

Policies that were written before the Affordable Care Act was passed were grandfathered in. Policies written between that date and December 31st were to expire and the insured would then convert to an Affordable Care Act compliant policy. The grandfather exception for the older policies is essentially worthless because insurers can not sell those policies any more.

Insurance is fairly simple: A large number of people purchase policies in case something (that is likely not to happen) happens. It takes a lot of people paying premiums and not using much healthcare to pay for one person who needs $1 million worth of quadruple heart bypass surgery. Those old grandfathered-in policies can’t add new healthy people to their pool so as people in the pool age and need more healthcare. So over time that old grandfathered in pool inevitably becomes too unhealthy to remain viable for the insurance compnay so those policies inevitably go away.

Speaker Mike Hubbard said,

“The President said there is ‘no sugarcoating’ the horrible start to Obamacare. I’m glad we could finally agree on something. The cure, though, is not to fix what the President called ‘kinks,’ but to repeal this law immediately before it causes any more damage.”

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National

Governor Ivey launches new COVID-19 search engine tool

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Governor Kay Ivey on Thursday announced the launch of a COVID-19 search engine tool that enhances the state’s official resource site, altogetheralabama.org.

Through a public-private partnership between Yext and the state of Alabama, this innovative platform will provide real-time answers to questions about everything from the virus itself, through a symptom checker that was developed at UAB, to upcoming COVID-19 testing site locations. 

This service is free of charge and can be accessed either through altogetheralabama.org or directly at covid19.alabama.gov.

“My priority as governor is making sure every Alabamian has the most accurate, up-to-date information about COVID-19, so we can keep our families safe,” Governor Ivey said. “To help with this, we’ve partnered with our friends in the private sector, Yext, to build this search engine tool that works in conjunction with our official resource site Altogether Alabama.”

“We are indebted to Yext for generously offering its resources and innovative technology to support the crucial job of keeping our state informed during this pandemic. Simply put, current information can be lifesaving and this resource will prove invaluable to all who use it,” Ivey said.

Using this search engine, someone can type a question about COVID-19 and get instant results directing them to answers from our local, state and federal partners.

“During a global crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic, accurate answers can be a matter of life and death,” said Howard Lerman, Founder and CEO of Yext. “With Yext Answers, we can help every government organization deliver that critical information and save as many lives as possible.”

The search engine provides factual information regarding this new virus and will provide additional information that complements the work of the Alabama Department of Health.

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State Health Officer Dr. Scott Harris said, “I want to express my gratitude to Yext for donating services and support for the covid19.alabama.gov information hub. This further enables the Alabama Department of Public Health and the state of Alabama to provide our residents with vital resources to health information during this COVID-19 pandemic.”

Dr. Regina Benjamin, former U.S. Surgeon General of Bayou La Batre, served as an expert health care consultant in the site development and provided valuable insight of information most needed by the public.

“The information hub covid19.alabama.gov puts real-time, up to date information at the general public’s fingertips, including the latest health stats, a UAB-symptom checker, and test site locations,” says Dr. Benjamin. “You can ask ‘Natural Language’ questions and be directed to answers from trusted sources such as the ADPH, CDC, and the Federation of American Scientists.”

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Crime

Pardons and Paroles: Restarting parole hearings “under review” amid COVID-19 crisis

Eddie Burkhalter

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The Alabama Bureau of Pardons and Paroles is reviewing the possibility of restarting parole hearings through virtual means during the COVID-19 crisis, a bureau spokesman said Thursday. 

Terry Abbott, spokesman for the Bureau of Pardons and Paroles, in a message to APR said that both a Wednesday report by the ACLU of Alabama on a decline in parole hearings and the possibility of resuming hearings via teleconferencing are under review. He declined further comment. 

The ACLU of Alabama’s Campaign for Smart Justice’s report shows that almost 4,000 people were eligible for parole hearings before April 1, 2020, but since November, the bureau has scheduled an average of 173 parole hearings per month, which is “less than half the average number of monthly hearings in FY 2019, and only a third of the average number of hearings held in FY 2018.” 

In September 2019, Gov. Kay Ivey appointed former Attorney General Charlie Graddick as executive director of ABPP, and former Jefferson County prosecutor and Assistant Attorney General Leigh Gwathney as chair of the parole board. 

The report notes that Graddick suspended all hearings in September and October, and when hearings resumed in November, the number of persons receiving a hearing declined sharply. 

“Additionally, the current board has denied release in 85 percent of cases considered. Only 133 people were granted parole out of the 866 cases considered in the last five months, a grant rate of just 15 percent,” the report states. 

During fiscal year 2019, the board’s parole grant rate was 31 percent, and in FY 2018, was 54 percent, according to the report. 

“Unless there is a dramatic increase in the number of parole hearings and parole grants, Alabama’s prison population will continue to skyrocket,” ACLU’s report states. 

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Aabama’s prisons were at 170 percent capacity in January, according to an Alabama Department of Corrections (ADOC) report

As of Tuesday, the last day ADOC had updated testing figures, 30 inmates had been tested, but no inmate was positive for COVID-19. There were seven pending test results for inmates, however. 

Two ADOC employees have tested positive for the virus. An employee at Staton Correctional Facility in Elmore County and at the St. Clair Correctional Facility both tested positive for COVID-19. 

Rep. Chris England, D-Tuscaloosa, in numerous tweets this week has called on the bureau to restart parole hearings by using an order by Ivey that allows board meetings to safely take place during the COVID-19 crisis.  

Ivey’s March 18 order allows state government bodies to “establish a quorum, deliberate, and take action- by means of telephone conference, video conference or other similar communications equipment” in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

England on Thursday cited an Al.com article that quotes Ivey’s press secretary, Gina Maiola, as saying Ivey recognized the importance of keeping Alabama’s criminal justice system functioning and included the option of holding virtual meetings in her order. 

@ALBPP seems that @GovernorKayIvey expected the Board to use the March 18th order to figure out a way to hold hearings and not cancel them. It has become clear that the Bureau’s mission is basically not to parole anyone, crisis or not.” England said in a Thursday mornring tweet. 

England in one tweet also noted that the Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles is considering releasing some inmates serving for non-violent crimes to community corrections programs to serve the remainder of their sentences outside of prison, as reported by WTVM

England told APR by phone Thursday that it doesn’t make sense that when all aspects of the state government are scrambling to address the crisis, a major component isn’t acting to help. 

“It would seem that the default position of the bureau has become, in times of challenge or controversy, just to stop holding hearings,” England said. 

England also said the bureau should be reviewing and releasing inmates who have serious medical problems, who are much more likely to suffer serious complications or death from COVID-19.  

“If COVID-19 ever invaded our prison system we would basically be giving them a death sentence,” England said.

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Health

ER doctors in frontline battle against COVID-19 are facing pay cuts

Bill Britt

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Emergency room doctors across the nation are experiencing cuts to pay, benefits and hours even as they battle COVID-19. Suddenly ER doctors in Alabama are facing the same slashes to their income.

“It’s crazy, cutting hours and pay right as hell breaks loose,” said an Alabama ER doctor who has spent the last month treating COVID-19 patients. “We are putting ourselves at risk, reusing supplies and dealing with constant uncertainty, and this is how we are treated.”

Healthcare professionals quoted in this report have asked that they not be identified by name because many hospitals have forbidden staff from speaking directly to the press.

“Testing is still so limited and the numbers are so inaccurate, and they don’t want the public to know how bad it is, so they tell us to shut up,” said an ER healthcare worker. “Now they are cutting our hours and pay, what are we supposed to do? I’m so frustrated.”

In other states, health system CEOs and leadership are forgoing or donating pay during the COVID-19 outbreak as systems face furloughing workers due to low revenue, according to a report in Fierce Healthcare.

Mount Sinai, a healthcare network in New York City, announced last week that the system’s leadership team would take a 50 percent pay cut “for as long as necessary so that these dollars can be directed to our front lines in this fight.”

Erlanger Health System, a seven-hospital system in Tennessee and North Carolina, announced March 30 it is reducing leadership pay as have other systems throughout the country.

Here in Alabama, cash strapped hospitals are cutting some frontline workers’ pay first while administrators so far have not offered to reduce their salaries to help those working in the middle of the calamity.

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Over half of Alabama’s hospitals were already facing financial difficulties before the coronavirus struck.

About 52 percent of the state’s hospitals had negative total margins before COVID-19, and 75 percent of them had negative operating margins before the outbreak, according to a report by APR‘s Chip Brownlee.

According to Brownlee’s report, nearly 90 percent of rural hospitals had negative operating margins before the COVID-19 pandemic invaded Alabama.

The recent $2.2 trillion stimulus bill known in congressional circles as COVID 3 was created in part to reimburse hospitals and other health providers to offer compensation for losses and additional expenses at the local level.

“The 2 trillion dollar package we passed — hospitals, health care facilities will get about $133 billion,” Alabama’s Democratic U.S. Sen. Doug Jones told APR in a phone conversation Wednesday evening. “That will be divvied up by the states and there’s a formula that they’ll use. Every hospital that’s dealing with this should get some of that money. That will help them in one way dealing with this crisis.”

But money from the stimulus package is slowly flowing and hospital administrators are not confident how much money they will receive. But even when the funds from COVID 3 are fully allocated, it will not be enough to fill the gaping hole in hospital budgets Jones believes.

“We all recognize that this [COVID 3] is not enough,” said Jones. “We’re going to have to put out some more money to help shore up these hospitals. So many of them have been operating in the red.”

In an effort to reduce stress on the state’s hospitals, all elective services were canceled. Elective surgeries, along with health and wellness programs, are profit centers for hospitals.

In some cases, more patients are coming into the hospitals, but they are not there for the high-profit procedures; they are sick needing immediate care.

“Now they’re focused on saving Alabamians, saving Americans, and so we’ve got to do our part to help backfill — we can’t afford to lose doctors and get them out of the profession,” said Jones. “We’ve already got a shortage. So we’re doing things I think to help that in COVID 3, and I think that’s going to be included in COVID 4.”

Senate Democrats are proposing that the fourth COVID-19 stimulus bill include additional pay for doctors, nurses, grocery-store workers, and other workers whose jobs are deemed essential.

“We are here at the hospital trying to help patients, protect the public and do our jobs under unbelievable circumstances,” said an ER doctor. “Who is watching out for us? Nobody?”

Jones says help is on its way but more must be done going forward.

“So now, people understand that your neighbor’s health — your health — is dependent on your neighbor’s health,” said Jones.

COVID-19 has exposed severe cracks in the state’s healthcare system. Jones sees expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act as a vital part of restoring Alabama’s healthcare system while offering much needed relief to all individuals affected by COVID-19.

“This has shone a light on the deficiencies in our system,” said Jones. “This has shone a light on the racial disparities in urban and rural areas. Everybody in Alabama, and America, has an opportunity to fix it,” said Jones. “We must act now.”

Not all Alabama hospitals are cutting ER doctors’ pay, hours, or benefits, but for many healthcare professionals on the frontlines, they now have one more thing to worry about — paying the bills.


Update: East Alabama Medical Center in Opelika, Alabama, announced after APR published this story that its leaders were taking a temporary reduction in pay in order to prevent cutting pay for frontline staff.

EAMC President and CEO Laura Grill explained the decision, “In an attempt to avoid impacting frontline staff as we are seeing elsewhere in Alabama and across the country, we are making some temporary pay cuts. I asked our senior leadership team to take the first cut and then we asked our employed physicians as well. Then, yesterday, we communicated a reduction in pay to the rest of our leadership team—our directors and managers. I am very hopeful that these cuts will be temporary and that business will return to normal in the near future. However, leadership starts with all of us. I am immensely proud of our team and entire organization, and thankful for the support of our community as we navigate these challenges.”

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Congress

ADOL begins paying federal $600 stimulus benefit

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Alabama Department of Labor Secretary Fitzgerald Washington announced today Alabama has begun paying the Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) benefit that was established with the passing of the federal CARES Act on March 27, 2020.

ADOL began paying the FPUC benefits on April 8, 2020.  Claimants whose claims have processed should expect to see the funds within 2-3 days, if not sooner.  ADOL paid $40,060,495 in FPUC benefits to 60,848 claimants yesterday.

Under the legislation, anyone receiving unemployment compensation benefits is eligible for the additional $600 a week stimulus payment. The payment is added to the recipient’s state weekly benefit amount (maximum of $275/week). The payments will be made for eligible weeks beginning on March 29, 2020 through July 25,2020. This does not refer to the date the original claim was filed, but to the weeks being claimed.  For example, if someone filed their initial claim on March 16, 2020, and remains out of work, they will not receive the additional $600 for the weeks beginning March 15 or March 22, but would receive it for the week beginning March 29, and all weeks going forward.

ADOL will make payments retroactively for weeks already claimed since March 29, 2020.

“We understand the frustration of many Alabamians who are out of work due to the COVID-19 outbreak, and we know that they need these benefits to stay afloat,” said Washington.  “We are working as hard as we can to make sure that everyone gets the benefits they need as quickly as they can.  We are one of the first states to begin distributing these funds. We continue to urge patience as the department works to implement this vital legislation.”

Programs included in the legislation:

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) – provides unemployment benefits to those not ordinarily eligible for them. This includes individuals who are self-employed or contract employees. This benefit is retroactive to January 27, 2020.

Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) – provides $600 per week to any individual eligible for any of the Unemployment Compensation programs. This benefit begins March 29, 2020. 

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Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) – allows for an additional 13 weeks of benefits added to the end of regular unemployment benefits. This means claimants may collect unemployment benefits for a longer period of time than under normal circumstances.

ADOL is encouraging anyone who believes they may be eligible for these programs to file a claim at www.labor.alabama.gov or by calling 1-866-234-5382. Online filing is strongly encouraged.

Those who already have an active claim, or who have already filed a claim, DO NOT NEED TO REFILE to be eligible for these benefits. ADOL will begin processing PUA and PEUC claims as soon as administratively possible.

Important note: None of the benefits described above, nor unemployment benefits of any kind, are available to employees who quit without good work-related cause, refuse to return to work, or refuse to receive full-time pay. Refusing to return to work could result in a disqualification for benefit eligibility. Attempts to collect unemployment benefits after quitting a job without good work-related cause is considered to be fraud.

The CARES Act specifically provides for serious consequences for fraudulent cases including fines, confinement, and an inability to receive future unemployment benefits until all fraudulent claims and fines have been repaid. Employers are encouraged to utilize the New Hire system to report those employees who fail to return to work.

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